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  3. Fire Rooster

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    Footnote: https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/beer-yeast/
  4. Yesterday
  5. Creeps McLane

    Bottled now...

    If you just bottled them and you want them to carbonate, you need ideally 70 degree room. Cool and dark would be a great place to “cellar” beer, not carb. So three weeks at room temp or higher to carb up. Whether or not you store them warm / cool / or cold is up to you. Understand that beer ages faster at warmer temps. Maybe you want to condition your beer for awhile so warm would be ideal. I have a cellar which is great for lagering and storing beer. When your beer is ready to drink, put them all in the fridge. I dont have much much experience with under filled bottles although I remember them being different than full ones. Some one else will be able to help you further.
  6. Grappler

    Bottled now...

    Hello, I am moving on to the next step in my first batch. So, they are bottled and sitting cool and dark. After 3 weeks: 1. Do they go right into the fridge? 2. 1 bottle is not filled all the way- will it be ok? Thanks. This is been fun start.
  7. Fire Rooster

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    Thank You !, will check that one out also ,and did I mention my basement also has a large sink with running hot/cold water ? http://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/nottingham-high-performance-ale-yeast/ Looks good, and a dry yeast
  8. Cato

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    Another to consider is Nottingham its rated range is 57-70F. I really like that yeast and it's quite a neutral yeast.
  9. Some really great info and advice everyone! Going to begin cooking in a few hours. Thank you all so much. This community is great, Im learning more and more everyday!
  10. Fire Rooster

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    Something like that might be the answer. The basement stays within a fairly narrow temperature range year round regardless of arctic blast or heat wave 55-61. Although I have never seen 55, the gauge records it, so it must be brief, always see 59 or 61 year round. For now will start in basement 2 weeks, then move to kitchen counter for 1 week where it's upper 60's. It's much easier/efficient to have a yeast that works with my environment, than me trying to create an environment for the yeast. I have a very large temperature stable basement, that most dont' have, and should be worked to my advantage.
  11. RickBeer

    Classic American Light Tweaking

    You won't get either. Honey adds no honey flavor. Not a drop. Honey adds sugar, which ferments away, raising the ABV (slightly for the amount you are using). It dries out a beer, so it's appropriate on some beers is you want a dry, not sweet, finish. Horse's Ass adds a cup of honey, which is 16x what you're planning. That's 3/4 of a pound of honey. That gives the "crisp finish". And no honey flavor, which you get from steeping a small amount of honey malt. The reason I'm pointing this out is that if you don't know the potential impact of something you're adding, and you like or don't like the result, you don't know how you go it. I'd lose the honey, steep the Caramel Malt (again, following the partial mash instructions on the Mr. Beer site), bring the resulting steeped water (grain bag removed) to a boil, add 1/2 ounce of the hops and boil for 15 minutes, then remove from heat. Stir in the HME. A week later dry hop the other 1/2 oz (carefully following sanitation instructions).
  12. Just some more complexity and character I suppose. I got the idea from that Horses Ass Ale recipie someone posted earlier in this thread.
  13. No. Go 3 1/2 and bottle. Or cold crash and bottle.
  14. RickBeer

    Classic American Light Tweaking

    I'd strongly suggest you reading some of the partial mash recipes on the Mr. Beer site, which include full instructions as to how to steep and add hops. What is it you hope to gain by using a tablespoon of honey?
  15. Nickfixit

    Classic American Light Tweaking

    I would steep the grains, make the liquid up to 4 cups with tap water and bring to boil. If I wanted more bitterness I would add hops in bag and boil them now. Even a short boil - 15 min will add some bitterness. Try using the recipe builder online and see. You even get some by steeping the hops in hot water for 30 min. then just adding the liquid. I have done that with some beers. If you want a more fresh hoppy aroma, put the honey in and half oz. of the hops in a bag and bring to boil. Give it a minute or 2, then turn heat off and add HME. A week before bottling boil another hop bag for a couple min., put the other half oz. of the hops in and put it in the LBK. It will be beautifully Cascady then. I sterilize tongs and move the hop bag (s) out of the pan into the LBK first to avoid a big PLOP as it pours in. I do the same when bottling - remove the hop bags with sterilized tongs before bottling. I squeeze the bags carefully, holding the bag top with other hand, with the tongs to get beer out. You still do lose some beer in the hop bags though so if you want the full complement of bottles fill the LBK maybe 1/4 " higher to compensate.
  16. Nickfixit

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    You could try "Cry Havoc" it is an ale yeast that works fine at lager and ale temps and works for either style at the right temp. It has an interesting history too. It is a lower attenuating yeast too, like S-04. https://www.homebrewsupply.com/white-labs-cry-havok-wlp862-yeast.html
  17. Fire Rooster

    S-04 & US-05 @ Low Temps

    Guess I'll switch to S-04 yeast for everything, I probably will only do IPA's, Pale Ales, etc. Have full reign in basement, not so on first floor. Without any extra/steps/special equipment I want a yeast to do well in an LBK at ambient 59-61. Just checked again and it's 59 degrees, but still records low 55. Must be while I'm sleeping because morning or afternoon when checked it's 59, summer it's almost always 61. Basement is 1700 sq ft, all open, concrete walls, 8' high ceiling, so if the the LBK wants to heat up it doesn't by much due to thermal capacity. If I start getting great brews (I'm the Judge), will switch to glass bottles and consider all grain.
  18. Can anyone out there tell me what im doing right now?

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  19. to do it the MRB way, you would steep your grains at ~152 deg for 30 min. then bring to a boil, and remove from heat. then add can of HME, honey and hops sack, stir up and throw it into the LBK and top off with water according to instructions. MRB experts may have a different take, but that's the way i understand it.
  20. So just to adjust my recipie, I should probably bring to boil after steeping the malts and then boil the hops, then flame off, then mix in the wort? Or just better off wort and hops together in hot (not boiling) water? Or my choice?
  21. one of the better MRB recipes in my opinion.
  22. Jdub

    Hello!

    welcome. i think the single best piece of equipment i bought when starting was a coleman cooler and a thermometer with a probe. my 1st few batches fermented too warm and was ugly. that allowed me to use frozen water bottles to regulate the temp and held it well. that's scratching the surface, but that made a big difference. brew on brother!
  23. Welcome.....check out the Horse's Ass Ale recipe. Not to duplicate it, but for the instructions. it's a recipe that uses honey and CAL HME. Might help with the instructions and order of operations. just before everything, steep the grains for 30 min at ~152 deg and see what happens. free advice from JDub. https://www.mrbeer.com/horse-s-ass-ale-recipe
  24. D Kristof

    Classic American Light Tweaking

    Definitely use the sack. For your first time, tie the knot as close to the open end as possible. Those hop pellets will absorb water and fall apart. You will be amazed by the volume increase.
  25. Creeps McLane

    Classic American Light Tweaking

    That my friend is up to you. If theyre the pellets then they do dissolve but not entirely. If i were you id put them in a hop sack separate from the grains. Just to be specific. Malts are steeped, hops are boiled. Dont boil grain. Pull the hop sack out before dumping into your fermenter
  26. Thanks! As far as the hops go, this is my first go at it, should I be putting them in the sack as I did with the malt? Or is it something that disolves or makes no difference if it sits in the fermenter when I put the wort in?
  27. Last week
  28. HollywoodTRBros

    Tangerously Hoppy IPA at 68 degrees. Too hot?

    Awesome, thats good to know. I'll make sure to keep it clean, is there anything I should be looking out for when letting it ferment a bit longer than three weeks?
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