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  3. zorak1066

    No evidence of fermentation?

    in case nobody mentioned ... airlock activity is not a reliable sign of fermentation. since krausen can come and go so fast you might miss it, always check the bottom for trub. no trub? no fermentation. trub? it's all good. i'm not into fancy shmancy fermenter contraptions but sorry for your loss. i use buckets that i rig the lid for a plastic pipe elbow and a hose for blowoff. the only problem i occasionally get with a bucket is when krausen clogs the airlock hole and tries to blow the lid off.
  4. DrMJG

    Kolsch recipe using Czech Pilsner?

    My Shade Tree Kolsch came out as quite tasty.
  5. Yesterday
  6. MRB Josh R

    The Real Mr. Beer - Live Stream Thread

    No streams next week because we will be at the National Homebrew Conference. Hope to see you there!
  7. It seemed to me that it leaked from the top of the seal rubber and not the spigot itself. I was able to give the keg clearance from the door. I'm not sure if the seal broke when it was propped or what. The amount left in it was over the seal and spigot line a little bit. I was pretty frustrated and just chucked the thing instead of trying to find out what really happened. The seal on this LBK has been troublesome since day 1. The plastic wasn't really flush, and I had to sand it down to fix it. Could have become compromised once propped. Maybe the cold had something to do with it. The quality of this LBK left something to be desired for sure. My other LBK is darker and the cuts are cleaner and more flush on the plastic. I'm likely to switch to less troublesome fermenting vessels. Just need to raise the funds for carboys, a cooler bag, and more ingredients. In the meantime, I still have the other LBK and my trusty cooler.
  8. MRB Tim

    The Real Mr. Beer - Live Stream Thread

    I was hoping no one noticed lol. It's been a long few weeks. When you're live, these things happen.
  9. That's awful. Sorry to hear about that loss. I try to be real careful in making sure the spigot handle won't contact anything that could cause it to leak when closing the fridge door during fermentation or cold crashing.
  10. Cato

    Too long?

    At the mention of burnt rubber and rotten eggs, I'd be hitting the add to cart button on another couple LBK's, and saying sayonnara to that batch! Lol, I can still hear my mother saying when in doubt throw it out. @rowe0123, however you proceed, in the future you might want to put your batch action schedule in your smartphone, tablet, or computer. It helps me anyway to see what's coming up so i can make sure my inventory is good to go for my next brew day.
  11. Marius

    I cannot lager

    I ended up taking the ingredients, added rasberries changed out yeast and made a velvet velociraptor. Just not ready for lager yet.
  12. Marius

    Temperature Question??

    I always brew at the lower end of 65 and have not had any problems with slow or stalled fermentation.
  13. Marius

    No evidence of fermentation?

    That must have made a big mess. Sorry to hear that. Now, we will never know how that beer fermented. 🍻
  14. greyhound

    No evidence of fermentation?

    Frustrating update... this morning I decided to bottle. As mentioned, I am using a FastFerment. With valve shut, while disconnecting the threaded union at the bottom that holds the trub collection jar, beer started flowing. No matter what I did I couldn't correct it. Lost the entire batch. The ball valve bottom seal threaded seat had turned loose as I was unscrewing the union and I couldn't get it tightened enough with my fingers to correct it. Not being familiar with the FastFerment, I didn't realize until subsequently visiting one of their cleaning videos that the ball handle can be pulled off and there are "nubs" on the handle that can be used to turn the seal seal. Had I known that, I likely could have tightened the seat through the beer flow and only lost a portion of the batch. Don't know why this came loose. This batch was my third with the FastFerment. Not sure I'm going to like the FastFerment method vs. LBK.... Not giving up yet.
  15. Cato

    Redwood Ale

    Nice! That'll be a good beer.
  16. Bonsai & Brew

    Redwood Ale

    You guys would be proud of me. I brewed this up last night and limited the partial mash to 4 oz. US 2-row + 2 oz. Caramel 60. I did substitute a pack of Willamette for one of the Warriors, but that was necessitated by inventory issues. Style-wise, this beer should land somewhere between an Irish Red and an American Amber and I'm looking forward to drinking it.
  17. Jdub

    Black Beer'd porter

    BBP is the best beer I’ve made out of 14 batches. Love it. Needs to age quite a while though. Worth it.
  18. youdontknowme311

    The Real Mr. Beer - Live Stream Thread

    I think Tim forgot to add the Hme & lme in today's stream. lol
  19. Last week
  20. D Kristof

    Black Beer'd porter

    In addition to changing from smooth to robust LME after 2 weeks I add a 4" oak spiral I've soaked in bourbon. I leave it for another 2 weeks... yes, I know that's 4 weeks in the fermenter. I keep my temperatures at 60 degrees. On some occasions I increase the fermentables by using both the smooth and robust LME's and I use a lager yeast. Drinking one I bottled on 2/4 as a matter of fact. @MiniYoda might be able to comment on that combination.
  21. greyhound

    Temperature Question??

    You can adjust the temp by using fewer or smaller frozen water bottles and/or prop the cooler lid open a bit to allow some cold out.
  22. MiniYoda

    Too long?

    I can acquire it..............
  23. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    Or put it in a secondary vessel with some Brettanomyces yeast and age it for 6 months. The brett will consume the off-flavors as well as the dead yeast cells. It's also a natural antioxidant and will prevent oxidation. Of course, you'd have to like the funky flavors that brett creates (I know I do). It can be an acquired taste.
  24. Shrike

    Too long?

    Best thing to do now is build a still and distill it into 'shine.
  25. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    Yes, it is. The warmer it is, the faster autolysis happens. It's also dependent on the yeast's age and strain. Older, stressed yeast will autolyze much sooner than fresh yeast. Repitching yeast from batch to batch can also stress the yeast rendering them more prone to autolysis. And certain strains are more prone to autolysis than others. These strains usually include yeasts that aren't very ABV tolerant.
  26. Thanks D Kristof... I would pour out my drink in memory of the HAA, but then I'd really have nothing left!
  27. D Kristof

    Too long?

    @MRB Josh R, is the rate of autolysis variable by temperature? Meaning, given two fermenters, one at ambient temperatures and one held at a lower temperature within the yeast's preferential temperature range, would the room temperature fermenter have a greater risk of autolysis off flavors?
  28. Bonsai & Brew

    Redwood Ale

    Has anyone brewed this one yet? The recipe looks great as is, but I'm thinking of partial mashing it with some Maris Otter and maybe a specialty malt or two. https://www.mrbeer.com/redwood-ale
  29. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    After about 4 weeks, the yeast will begin to autolyze. When a yeast cell dies, it ruptures - releasing several off-flavors into the beer. When you have a large yeast mass on the bottom of the fermentor, you have a large potential for off-flavors due to autolysis. Some of the off-flavors/aromas include burnt rubber or rotten eggs. It can get really bad if left too long. Also, after a few weeks, most of the protective Co2 will off-gas, leaving the beer vulnerable to contamination from wild yeast, mold, bacteria, etc. If your beer has experienced autolysis, you will know it. Give it a taste. If it tastes like flat beer, it's probably fine. But if it's unpalatable, your yeast may have autolyzed. Never leave beer on the sediment for longer than 3 weeks to prevent autolysis. The only exception to this rule is if you are aging the beer in secondary with a wild yeast, such as Brettanomyces. Brett will eat dead yeast, preventing autolysis.
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