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  2. Today
  3. Cato

    Redwood Ale

    Nice! That'll be a good beer.
  4. Bonsai & Brew

    Redwood Ale

    You guys would be proud of me. I brewed this up last night and limited the partial mash to 4 oz. US 2-row + 2 oz. Caramel 60. I did substitute a pack of Willamette for one of the Warriors, but that was necessitated by inventory issues. Style-wise, this beer should land somewhere between an Irish Red and an American Amber and I'm looking forward to drinking it.
  5. Jdub

    Black Beer'd porter

    BBP is the best beer I’ve made out of 14 batches. Love it. Needs to age quite a while though. Worth it.
  6. youdontknowme311

    The Real Mr. Beer - Live Stream Thread

    I think Tim forgot to add the Hme & lme in today's stream. lol
  7. Yesterday
  8. D Kristof

    Black Beer'd porter

    In addition to changing from smooth to robust LME after 2 weeks I add a 4" oak spiral I've soaked in bourbon. I leave it for another 2 weeks... yes, I know that's 4 weeks in the fermenter. I keep my temperatures at 60 degrees. On some occasions I increase the fermentables by using both the smooth and robust LME's and I use a lager yeast. Drinking one I bottled on 2/4 as a matter of fact. @MiniYoda might be able to comment on that combination.
  9. greyhound

    Temperature Question??

    You can adjust the temp by using fewer or smaller frozen water bottles and/or prop the cooler lid open a bit to allow some cold out.
  10. MiniYoda

    Too long?

    I can acquire it..............
  11. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    Or put it in a secondary vessel with some Brettanomyces yeast and age it for 6 months. The brett will consume the off-flavors as well as the dead yeast cells. It's also a natural antioxidant and will prevent oxidation. Of course, you'd have to like the funky flavors that brett creates (I know I do). It can be an acquired taste.
  12. Shrike

    Too long?

    Best thing to do now is build a still and distill it into 'shine.
  13. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    Yes, it is. The warmer it is, the faster autolysis happens. It's also dependent on the yeast's age and strain. Older, stressed yeast will autolyze much sooner than fresh yeast. Repitching yeast from batch to batch can also stress the yeast rendering them more prone to autolysis. And certain strains are more prone to autolysis than others. These strains usually include yeasts that aren't very ABV tolerant.
  14. Thanks D Kristof... I would pour out my drink in memory of the HAA, but then I'd really have nothing left!
  15. D Kristof

    Too long?

    @MRB Josh R, is the rate of autolysis variable by temperature? Meaning, given two fermenters, one at ambient temperatures and one held at a lower temperature within the yeast's preferential temperature range, would the room temperature fermenter have a greater risk of autolysis off flavors?
  16. Bonsai & Brew

    Redwood Ale

    Has anyone brewed this one yet? The recipe looks great as is, but I'm thinking of partial mashing it with some Maris Otter and maybe a specialty malt or two. https://www.mrbeer.com/redwood-ale
  17. MRB Josh R

    Too long?

    After about 4 weeks, the yeast will begin to autolyze. When a yeast cell dies, it ruptures - releasing several off-flavors into the beer. When you have a large yeast mass on the bottom of the fermentor, you have a large potential for off-flavors due to autolysis. Some of the off-flavors/aromas include burnt rubber or rotten eggs. It can get really bad if left too long. Also, after a few weeks, most of the protective Co2 will off-gas, leaving the beer vulnerable to contamination from wild yeast, mold, bacteria, etc. If your beer has experienced autolysis, you will know it. Give it a taste. If it tastes like flat beer, it's probably fine. But if it's unpalatable, your yeast may have autolyzed. Never leave beer on the sediment for longer than 3 weeks to prevent autolysis. The only exception to this rule is if you are aging the beer in secondary with a wild yeast, such as Brettanomyces. Brett will eat dead yeast, preventing autolysis.
  18. rowe0123

    Too long?

    Is it possible to ferment too long? I have a partial mash that I began fermenting on April 24 and I forgot about it until today. Is it possible for it to have fermented too long? What will happen?
  19. @Njaim, truly sorry for your loss.
  20. D Kristof

    Carbonation

    My bet is on some type of starch.
  21. robo1

    Black Beer'd porter

    I'm bottling Black Beer'd on Thursday. I've heard good things, so fingers crossed!
  22. Njaim

    Carbonation

    I did 2 tsp table sugar in 740ml pet bottles last time I bottled and none have exploded on me but a few of the lids looked a little bulged out. I should probably check my beer closet right now for explosions...
  23. Tldr: thank you all. I have done alright with temperature control since this major fluctuation. But had major beer loss during cold crash. But my previous batch came out great. Long version: Thank you everyone for all the great advice. I've been using the cooler method since my second batch, and other than this one major fluctuation, I've been able to keep the temperatures in normal ranges changing out only one frozen water bottle per day in each cooler. I was going to bottle my Horses Ass Ale Monday morning, and I cold crashed my LBK in the fridge for 3 days with it slightly propped up as the suggestions go. I was away all day yesterday and came home to my vegetable drawer full of flat, delicious smelling beer. Apparently the LBK leaked on day 3. It didn't leak for the 3 weeks it fermented at all. Very sad day. I am only lucky it did get caught mostly in the drawer or the mess I had to clean at midnight would have been so much worse. What was left in the LBK was almost two 740ml bottles worth of the trubbiest bit of the beer. I went ahead and bottled and added sugar for carbonation. I tasted a very small sample and it showed great promise. Very sad indeed. I decided to retire this LBK (as it was a huge pain for both batches with the spigot being difficult to seal perfectly after cleaning and sanitizing) and start looking into different vessels for future beer making. Ideally something on the smaller sides as I'm not ready for 5 gallon batch sizes yet and don't know how I'll do temperature control outside of my coolers. If my other LBK (has a Weissbier kit going) doesn't leak, I may continue using it for at least one more batch. But I'm deathly afraid to cold crash it now and may just try to do so in the cooler itself and no propping. As a positive, the Long Play IPA (batch #2) that conditioned for a month is pretty damn tasty. My first real success followed immediately by the loss of so much time and the ingredients/cost for the Horse's Ass Ale. Rambling aside, I do feel my process is getting tighter with many thanks to the advice on this page.
  24. Last week
  25. Bonsai & Brew

    Churchill’s brown ale

    @Cato is kind of going that way with his Wee Heavy Winston, but you need to join in the fun with your own recipe!
  26. doc280

    Metallic Grass like taste, need help

    Really the differences between these samples was so dramatic a heckuva palate was not required. I have put bottles of each version away for future sampling at different time periods, just for my curiosity. If you guys would like me to do them blind, I can do that and post the results.
  27. Shrike

    Metallic Grass like taste, need help

    That's one heckuva palate you have there, @doc280! Do you plan on doing another blind test at the four-week point?
  28. doc280

    Metallic Grass like taste, need help

    The blind test taste, two bottles of Kama Citra IPA, carbonated and conditioned in the bottle for one week. One primed with table sugar and one primed with corn sugar and these were refrigerated for one week. Earlier in this thread I mentioned I could taste a difference with the corn sugar being more bitter. In the blind tasting the two samples were poured the same way in the glass and well there is a visual difference, captured in the picture below. I had my wife hand me the samples randomly, while my were closed, no peeking, and these are the results. Three out of three times, it was very easy to taste the difference between the two samples. The sample which tasted more bitter and had less aroma came from bottle primed with corn sugar. The sample which was less bitter, smoother mouth feel and stronger aroma was from the bottle primed with table sugar. Now in four weeks there may be no difference between the two samples, however with one week of conditioning, there most definitely is. Although the bottle primed with corn sugar holds a better head, the taste, aroma and mouth feel of the bottle primed with table sugar wins out. The below picture, the table sugar sample is on the left and the corn sugar sample is on the right.
  29. BDawg62

    Churchill’s brown ale

    Hoppy, That would have too much dark malt for a Scottish.
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