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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/22/2016 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Great post. Some points: Remove labels with a hot Oxiclean soak. Some brands use glue that doesn't come off easy. Sam Adams float off... Lots of posts on good and bad brands for label removal. Yes, trying to do 2 things at once leads to mistakes. We've all done it once (cough, cough). The Mr. Beer sugar measurer is a great investment. And yes, it works best dry also.
  2. 2 points
    JoshR

    Copper Ale recipe?

    IBUs are basically pointless for figuring out how bitter a beer really is. I explain why here: "It is the level of co-humulone in the alpha acids that will dictate the type of bitterness the beer will have. Higher co-humulone hops tend to have a more bracing or harsh bitterness, while lower levels of co-humulone tend to have a softer more rounded bitterness. So determining bitterness by IBUs doesn't really work because it's mostly the co-humulone that determines bitterness, not the alpha acids themselves. Any hops above 25% will have high co-humulone content and will therefore taste more bitter than hops that have a content below 25% (most Noble hops are below 20%). Hop Union has a great list that shows the co-humulone contents of most varieties. Keep these numbers in mind when choosing bittering hops for hop-forward beers."
  3. 2 points
    bpgreen

    Copper Ale recipe?

    There are different formulas that can be used to estimate IBUs. Depending on a lot of different factors, one might do a better job than another one time and another might do better the next time. Some brewing software (such as BeerSmith) will let you configure which formula to use. And with some formulas, there are additional parameters that you can set to tweak the result. I live at an elevation, so water boils at a lower temperature. That also affects utilization. There's a formula that takes that into account, as well, but I usually just aim for slightly higher IBUs than the software comes up with. But in the end, no matter which formula you use, it's still an estimate. Another thing that people often fail to take into consideration is that IBUs aren't enough to determine how bitter your beer will taste. The bitterness of the hops offsets the sweetness from residual sugars (the ones that didn't ferment, but are still there adding body and mouthfeel). There's a chart somewhere that shows a BU:GU ratio that helps determine whether a beer is sweet, balanced or hoppy based on the ratio between the IBUs and the OG. But even that isn't really the whole story, because it doesn't take into account how much of the sugar in the beer will ferment out. For example, if you've got a big IPA where you used some white sugar to thin it out somewhat, the white sugar will ferment out and leave you with a lower FG, so if that beer has the same IBUs as a beer with the same OG that is all malt, it will be perceived to be more bitter. There are also some yeasts that really tear through the beer and flocculate out really fast that supposedly reduce the hoppiness of the final beer.
  4. 2 points
    JoshR

    Abbey Dubbel- How to increase ABV

    That's impossible. You can't raise the ABV without changing the flavor, no matter what you do. Anything you add or subtract will change the flavor. If you like the flavor of that beer, leave it as it is. If you want more alcohol, just drink more of it.
  5. 1 point
    Bottled my first batch (Canadian Blonde) the other day after 3 weeks fermenting at constant 64 degrees. While prepping to bottle, and having a 2nd LBK, I thought I would brew a second batch since I'd already be clearing the area for the bottling process and have the sanitizer mixed, etc. The second batch is American Lager with Pale LBE. Some things I came across during this last process that may (or may not) be helpful to others and my next bottling experience: Removing the labels off of used pry off beer bottles is laborious. Get your kids to do it or hire someone crazy enough to take the job if you can. I used bottles from a local brewery (Penn Brewery in Pittsburgh). The bottles are great but the labels were really tough to get off, even after soaking in a stationary tub in hot water for a long time. Ended up using a glass scraper with a single edge razor blade. This helped much but be careful with the blade. You need more room than you think. I used 12 oz bottles and 740 ml bottles. Staging areas for sanitized bottles, capping filled bottles, the LBK, utensils in sanitizer, the capper, etc. takes up more room than you think. The more area you can dedicate the more efficient and consistent your process will be. The markings on my second LBK are not the same as the original one that came in my kit. Just don't be confused if you get a second LBK and measure the amounts anyway regardless of the markings. Although it made sense at the time, if you're a new brewer I would not brew my second batch immediately after bottling my first. I realized that doing so made it more confusing and I found that I forgot to sanitize a whisk I use to mix the wort and the process came to a halt while it was sanitizing. Brewing or bottling on it's own makes the process more straight forward and simple. I used carbo drops in the 740ml and table sugar in the 12 oz bottles. I sanitized the funnel for the sugar but it wasn't dried completely when I used it. Not being dry is fine for the LBK, bottles or utensils but a wet funnel doesn't work great for putting sugar in bottles. Sugar "sludge" sits in the funnel and not all the sugar goes into the bottle. Next time I know to ensure the funnel is complete dry. The MRB bottling wand is wonderful and made the process very simple, ensuring that the bottles are filled appropriately by removing the wand when the bottle fills up leaving the right amount of space. Looking to forward to drinking the home brew in 4 weeks and the next time I'll wait at least a few days before beginning the next one.
  6. 1 point
    Do not touch it. Do not open your keg until 21 days have elapsed. Stop perving your beer! It's fine. Read the forum while you wait.
  7. 1 point
    MRB Josh B

    Magento Error 503 Code

    Not that you already haven't done enough to help @Bonsai & Brew, but if you happen to have another chance can you go to the following URL and send me the results? http://www.mrbeer.com/cdn-cgi/trace If you do not want to post it, (though there is no real personal information in it) you may e-mail me at joshb@mrbeer.com. For anyone else having a 503 error, please go to this link as well and let me know the results. Thanks!
  8. 1 point
    Atomicwombat

    Questions about krausen

    I just wanted to give a quick update. Now 72 hours into the process, the batch that had the thin krausen yesterday looks much better today. It has almost caught up with the other. I guess it was just a slow starter for whatever reason. Thanks for the advice to not mess with it and let it ride.
  9. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Magento Error 503 Code

    I still say that Magneto was involved...
  10. 1 point
    Correction. Snowsuits would get soggy. Drysuits, like divers wear.
  11. 1 point
    The yeast have teeny tiny snowsuits.
  12. 1 point
    Cuban IPA

    Abbey Dubbel- How to increase ABV

    Drink more of it..lol..I like that. Thanks Guys! You know I am just trying to figure out why people add more of something to either add ABV or flavor change to their liking. I have read so much material in the last 4 weeks that I just trying to chose my avenue through home brewing. I guess I should take my own advice and go baby steps into this new uncharted world. But I get so excited and curious to try new things. Eventually, I will get their. I guess in due time. Happy Brewing gentleman!
  13. 1 point
    The cold doesn't kill the yeast at all. It simply makes it go to sleep. In fact, I store washed yeast I've harvested from past batches in the refrigerator for several months. I usually need to do a yeast starter each time so the population will be at the correct rate for pitching. I only do this for hard to find liquid yeasts though. Unless the beer is pasteurized, there will always be some living yeast in it.
  14. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Brewer's Glossary

    The old Mr. Beer community had a glossary, for some reason the new one doesn't. Here it is, copied from the Wayback Machine: Glossary AcetaldehydeGreen apple aroma, a byproduct of fermentation. AdditiveEnzymes, preservatives and antioxidants which are added to simplify the brewing process or prolong shelf life. AdjunctFermentable material used as a substitute for traditional grains, to make beer lighter-bodied or cheaper. AerobicAn organism, such as top fermenting ale yeast, that needs oxygen to metabolize. AlcoholEthyl alcohol or ethanol. An intoxicating by-product of fermentation, which is caused by yeast acting on sugars in the malt. Alcohol content is expressed as a percentage of volume or weight. Alcohol by weightAmount of alcohol in beer measured in terms of the percentage weight of alcohol per volume of beer, i.e., 3.2% alcohol by weights equals 3.2 grams of alcohol per 100 centiliters of beer. (It is approximately 20% less than alcohol by volume.) Alcohol by volumeAmount of alcohol in beer in terms of percentage volume of alcohol per volume of beer. AlcoholicWarming taste of ethanol and higher alcohol's. AleBeers distinguished by use of top fermenting yeast strains, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The top fermenting yeast perform at warmer temperatures than do yeast's used to brew lager beer, and their byproducts are more evident in taste and aroma. Fruitiness and esters are often part of an ale's character. All-maltA relatively new term in America. "All malt" refers to a beer made exclusively with barley malt and without adjuncts. AmberAny top or bottom fermented beer having an amber color, that is, between pale and dark. AnaerobicAn organism, such as a bottom-fermenting lager yeast, that is able to metabolize without oxygen present. Aroma HopsVarieties of hop chosen to impart bouquet. (See Hops) AstringentA drying, puckering taste; tannic; can be derived from boiling the grains, long mashes, over sparging or sparging with hard water. AttenuationExtent to which yeast consumes fermentable sugars (converting them into alcohol and carbon dioxide). BacterialA general term covering off-flavors such as moldy, musty, woody, lactic acid, vinegar, or microbiological spoilage. Balling DegreesScale indicating density of sugars in wort. Devised by C J N Balling. BarleyA cereal grain that is malted for use in the grist that becomes the mash in the brewing of beer. BarrelA unit of measurement used by brewers in some countries. In Britain, a barrel holds 36 imperial gallons (1 imperial gallon = 4.5 liters), or 1.63 hectoliters. In the United States, a barrel holds 31.5 US gallons (1 US gallon = 3.8 liters), or 1.17 hectoliters. BeerName given alcohol-containing beverages produced by fermenting grain, specifically malt, and flavored with hops. BitterBitterness of hops or malt husks; sensation on back of tongue. BitternessThe perception of a bitter flavor, in beer from iso-alpha-acid in solution (derived from hops). It is measured in International Bitterness Units (IBU). Black maltPartially malted barley roasted at high temperatures. Black malt gives a dark color and roasted flavor to beer. BodyThickness and mouth-filling property of a beer described as "full or thin bodied". Bottle-conditioningSecondary fermentation and maturation in the bottle, creating complex aromas and flavors. Bottom-fermenting yeastOne of the two types of yeast used in brewing. Bottom-fermenting yeast works well at low temperatures and ferments more sugars leaving a crisp, clean taste and then settles to the bottom of the tank. Also referred to as "lager yeast". BrewhouseThe collective equipment used to make beer. Brew KettleThe vessel in which wort from the mash is boiled with hops. Also called a copper. BrewpubPub that makes its own beer and sells at least 50% of it on premises. Also known in Britain as a home-brew house and in Germany as a house brewery. Bright Beer TankSee conditioning tank. BungThe stopper in the hole in a keg or cask through which the keg or cask is filled and emptied. The hole may also be referred to as a bung or bunghole. Real beer must use a wooden bung. ButterscotchSee diacetyl. CabbagelikeAroma and taste of cooked vegetables; often a result of wort spoilage bacteria killed by alcohol in fermentation. CAMRAThe CAMpaign for Real Ale. An organization in England that was founded in 1971 to preserve the production of cask-conditioned beers and ales. CarbonationSparkle caused by carbon dioxide, either created during fermentation or injected later. CaramelA cooked sugar that is used to add color and alcohol content to beer. It is often used in place of more expensive malted barley. Caramel maltA sweet, coppery-colored malt. Caramel or crystal malt imparts both color and flavor to beer. Caramel malt has a high concentration of unfermentable sugars that sweeten the beer and, contribute to head retention. CaskA closed, barrel-shaped container for beer. They come in various sizes and are now usually made of metal. The bung in a cask of "Real" beer or ale must be made of wood to allow the pressure to be relived, as the fermentation of the beer, in the cask, continues. Cask-conditioningSecondary fermentation and maturation in the cask at the point of sale. Creates light carbonation. ChlorophenolicA plasticlike aroma; caused by chemical combination of chlorine and organic compounds. Chill hazeCloudiness caused by precipitation of protein-tannin compound at low temperatures, does not affect flavor. Chill proofBeer treated to allow it to withstand cold temperatures without clouding. ClovelikeSpicy character reminiscent of cloves; characteristic of some wheat beers, or if excessive, may derive from wild yeast. ConditioningPeriod of maturation intended to impart "condition" (natural carbonation). Warm conditioning further develops the complex of flavors. Cold conditioning imparts a clean, round taste. Conditioning TankA vessel in which beer is placed after primary fermentation where the beer matures, clarifies and, is naturally carbonated through secondary fermentation. Also called bright beer tank, serving tank and, secondary tank. Contract BeerBeer made by one brewery and then marketed by a company calling itself a brewery. The latter uses the brewing facilities of the former. CopperSee brew kettle. DecoctionExhaustive system of mashing in which portions of the wort are removed, heated, then returned to the original vessel. DextrinThe unfermentable carbohydrate produced by the enzymes in barley. It gives the beer flavor, body, and mouthfeel. Lower temperatures produce more dextrin and less sugar. While higher temperatures produce more sugars and less dextrin. DiacetylA volatile compound in beer that contributes to a butterscotch flavor, measured in parts per million. DMSTaste and aroma of sweet corn; results from malt, as a result of the short or weak boil of the wort, slow wort chilling, or bacterial infection. -- Dimethyl sulfide, a sulfur compound. DosageThe addition of yeast and/or sugar to the cask or bottle to aid secondary fermentation. Draft (Draught)The process of dispensing beer from a bright tank, cask or, keg, by hand pump, pressure from an air pump or, injected carbon dioxide inserted into the beer container prior to sealing. Dry-hoppingThe addition of dry hops to fermenting or aging beer to increase its hop character or aroma. EBCEuropean Brewing Convention. An EBC scale is used to indicate colors in malts and beers. EnzymesCatalysts that are found naturally in the grain. When heated in mash, they convert the starches of the malted barley into maltose, a sugar used in solution and fermented to make beer. EsterVolatile flavor compound naturally created in fermentation. Often fruity, flowery or spicy. EsteryAroma or flavor reminiscent of flowers or fruits. Fahrenheit (degrees)F = ((Cx9)/( 5) + 32. FermentationConversion of sugars into ethyl alcohol and carbon dioxide, through the action of yeast. Final specific gravitySpecific gravity of a beer when fermentation is complete (that is, all fermentable sugars have been fermented). FiningAn aid to clarification: a substance that attracts particles that would otherwise remain suspended in the brew. FilterThe removal of designated impurities by passing the wort through a medium, sometimes made of diatomaceous earth ( made up of the microscopic skeletal remains of marine animals). Yeast in suspension is often targeted for removal. Fruity/EsteryFlavor and aroma of bananas, strawberries, apples, or other fruit; from high temperature fermentation and certain yeast strains. GrainyTastes like cereal or raw grain. GravitySee specific gravity. GristBrewers' term for milled grains, or the combination of milled grains to be used in a particular brew. Derives from the verb to grind. Also sometimes applied to hops. Hand PumpA device for dispensing draft beer using a pump operated by hand. The use of a hand pump allows the cask-conditioned beer to be served without the use of pressurized carbon dioxide. HangLingering bitterness or harshness. Hard CiderA fermented beverage made from apples. Heat ExchangerA mechanical device used to rapidly reduce the temperature of the wort. HefeA German word meaning "yeast". Used mostly in conjunction with wheat (weiss) beers to denote that the beer is bottled or kegged with the yeast in suspension (hefe-weiss). These beers are cloudy, frothy and, very refreshing. HogsheadCask holding 54 imperial gallons ( 243 liters ). Hop backSieve-like vessel used to strain out the petals of the hop flowers. Known as a hop jack in the United States. HopsHerb added to boiling wort or fermenting beer to impart a bitter aroma and flavor. HoppyAroma of hops, does not include hop bitterness. InfusionSimplest form of mash, in which grains are soaked in water. May be at a single temperature, or with upward or (occasionally) downward changes. IBUInternational Bitterness units. A system of indicating the hop bitterness in finished beer. KegOne-half barrel, or 15.5 U. S. gallons. A half keg or, 7.75 U. S. gallons, is referred to as a pony-keg. KrauseningThe addition of a small proportion of partly fermented wort to a brew during lagering. Stimulates secondary fermentation and imparts a crisp, spritzy character. LagerBeers produced with bottom fermenting yeast strains, Saccharomyces uvarum (or carlsbergensis) at colder fermentation temperatures than ales. This cooler environment inhibits the natural production of esters and other byproducts, creating a crisper tasting product. LageringFrom the German word for storage. Refers to maturation for several weeks or months at cold temperatures (close to 0 degrees C /32F) to settle residual yeast, impart carbonation and make for clean round flavors. LauterTo run the wort from the mash tun. From the German word to clarify. A lauter tun is a separate vessel to do this job. It uses a system of sharp rakes to achieve a very intensive extraction of malt sugars. Lauter TunSee mash tun. LengthThe amount of wort brewed each time the brew house is in operation. Light-StruckSkunklike smell; from exposure to light. LiquorThe brewer's word for water used in the brewing process, as included in the mash or, used to sparge the grains after mashing. Malt (ing)The process by which barley is steeped in water, germinated ,then kilned to convert insoluble starch to soluble substances and sugar. The foundation ingredient of beer. Malt ExtractThe condensed wort from a mash, consisting of maltose, dextrins and, other dissolved solids. Either as a syrup or powdered sugar, it is used by brewers, in solutions of water and extract, to reconstitute wort for fermentation. Malt LiquorA legal term used in the U.S. to designate a fermented beverage of relatively high alcohol content (7%-8% by volume). Mash(Verb) To release malt sugars by soaking the grains in water. (Noun) The resultant mixture. Mash TunA tank where grist is soaked in water and heated in order to convert the starch to sugar and extract the sugars and other solubles from the grist. MaltoseA water soluble, fermentable sugar contained in malt. MeadMeads are produced by the fermentation of honey, water, yeast and optional ingredients such as fruit, herbs, and/or spices. According to final gravity, they are categorized as: dry (0.996 to 1009); medium (1010 to 1019); or sweet (1020 or higher). Wine, champagne, sherry, mead, ale or lager yeasts may be used. MedicinalChemical or phenolic character; can be the result of wild yeast, contact with plastic, or sanitizer residue. MetallicTastes tinny, bloodlike or coinlike; may come from bottle caps. MicrobrewerySmall brewery generally producing less than 15,000 barrels per year. Sales primarily off premises. MouthfeelA sensation derived from the consistency or viscosity of a beer, described, for example as thin or full. MustyMoldy, mildewy character; can be the result of cork or bacterial infection. Original gravityA measurement of the density of fermentable sugars in a mixture of malt and water with which a brewer begins a given batch. OxidizedStale flavor of wet cardboard, paper, rotten pineapple, or sherry, as a result of oxygen as the beer ages or is exposed to high temperatures. PasteurizationHeating of beer to 60-79C/140-174F to stabilize it microbiologically. Flash-pasteurization is applied very briefly, for 15-60 seconds by heating the beer as it passes through the pipe. Alternately, the bottled beer can be passed on a conveyor belt through a heated tunnel. This more gradual process takes at least 20 minutes and sometimes much longer. PhenolicFlavor and aroma of medicine, plastic, Band-Aids, smoke, or cloves; caused by wild yeast or bacteria, or sanitizer residue. PitchTo add yeast to wort. Plato, degreesExpresses the specific gravity as the weight of extract in a 100 gram solution at 64F (17.5C). Refinement of the Balling scale. PrimingThe addition of sugar at the maturation stage to promote a secondary fermentation. PubAn establishment that serves beer and sometimes other alcoholic beverages for consumption on premise. The term originated in England and is the shortened form of "public house". PublicanThe owner or manager of a pub. Regional specialty breweryA brewery that produces more than 15,000 barrels of beer annually, with its largest selling product a specialty beer. Reinheitsgebot"Purity Law" originating in Bavaria in 1516 and now applied to all German brewers making beer for consumption in their own country. It requires that only malted grains, hops, yeast and water may be used in the brewing. Saccharomyces cerevisiaeSee Top-fermenting yeast. Saccharomyces uvarumSee Bottom-fermenting yeast. Saccharomyces carlsbergensisSee Bottom-fermenting yeast. SaltyFlavor like table salt; experienced on the side of the tongue. Secondary fermentationStage of fermentation occurring in a closed container from several weeks to several months. Shelf lifeDescribes the number of days a beer will retain it's peak drinkability. The shelf life for commercially produced beers is usually a maximum of four months. SolventlikeReminiscent of acetone or lacquer thinner; caused by high fermentation temperatures. Sour/AcidicVinegarlike or lemonlike; can be caused by bacterial infection. Specific gravityA measure of the density of a liquid or solid compared to that of water ((1.000 at 39F (4C)). SpargeTo spray grist with hot water in order to remove soluble sugars (maltose). This takes place at the end of the mash. SquaresBrewers' term for a square fermenting vessel. SweetTaste like sugar; experienced on the front of the tongue. SulfurlikeReminiscent of rotten eggs or burnt matches; a by-product of some yeast's. TartTaste sensation cause by acidic flavors. Terminal gravitySynonym for final specific gravity. Top-fermenting yeastOne of the two types of yeast used in brewing. Top-fermenting yeast works better at warmer temperatures and are able to tolerate higher alcohol concentrations than bottom-fermenting yeast. It is unable to ferment some sugars, and results in a fruitier, sweeter beer. Also known as "ale yeast". Trub(from the German for lees) is the layer of sediment that appears at the bottom of the fermentor after the yeast has completed the bulk of the fermentation. It is composed mainly of heavy fats, proteins, and inactive yeast. TunAny large vessels used in brewing. In America, "tub" is often preferred. VinousReminiscent of wine. WinySherrylike flavor; can be caused by warm fermentation or oxidation in very old beer. WortThe solution of grain sugars strained from the mash tun. At this stage, regarded as "sweet wort", later as brewed wort, fermenting wort and finally beer. Wort ChillerSee heat exchanger. YeastA micro-organism of the fungus family. Genus Saccharomyces. YeastyYeastlike flavor; a result of yeast in suspension or beer sitting too long on sediment.
  15. 1 point
    efdbrian

    Copper Ale recipe?

    Regarding what @bpgreen said, I have used this page as one of my grain references. As mentioned, some grains convert better/easier than others. The "Power" column represents how much ability the grain has to convert to sugars on it's own. http://www.brewunited.com/grain_database.php
  16. 1 point
    bpgreen

    Having issues with my brewing

    I'm a fan of cold conditioning once you start building up a pipeline. I know that conventional wisdom is that the benefits of conditioning are all from the yeast when the yeast are active, but there are other things that happen at lower temperatures and I encourage everybody to try to give a few beers a week or more in the fridge.
  17. 1 point
    brybry

    Having issues with my brewing

    Probably should have mixed it with some vodka
  18. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Having issues with my brewing

    The coworker won't last more than a batch or two in this hobby.
  19. 1 point
    bpgreen

    Experimenting with Yeast

    I suspect that when he said SA-05, he actually meant Fermentis US-05 (and when he said SA-04, I suspect he meant Fermentis S-04. T-58 is a spicy yeast, probably best suited for things like Belgians (and you may want to ferment at higher temps to really bring out the flavors it can contribute. I know that if you reach into the fridge, pull out the pink US-05 packet to make an APA, if you don't actually look at the label and it turns out to be the T-58, you end up with an interesting (not sure if it was interesting in a good way) beer. US-05 is the "Chico" strain (WLP001 and Wyeast 1056 are the liquid versions). As a side note, when I first bought US-05, it was US-56. I've read that Wyeast sued Fermentis over the name and that's why it was renamed US-05. S-04 is more of an English strain. I don't know what the yeast is that ships with the Mr Beer kits, but I suspect (for a variety of reasons) that it's likely Cooper's ale yeast. If so, it's a good yeast that is very forgiving of higher fermentation temperatures. Nottingham is a good yeast to use if you're going to be brewing at fairly low temperatures (it's good for other purposes, also, but it's especially well suited to low temperatures). For example, I keep my house pretty cool in the winter (57 during the day and 50 at night) and ferment in my basement. The temperatures in the basement are cooler than the rest of the house during the day, but don't drop as much at night. The fermenters sit on the floor, so it's even cooler. Nottingham has a lower range of 57 (and I've read that they claim down to 54 with higher pitch rates), so it does just fine for me and I get very clean beers from it. When you brew at the low end of its range, you can get "lager like" beers. They're still ales, but it's such a clean fermentation, that it's a lot like a lager (I sometimes call these lagales). A lot of places seem to call it an English ale yeast, but I use it for APAs and American IPAs. As a side note, a few years ago, they had some packaging issues on a couple of batches and people were getting poor results. It became unavailable for a while as Danstar/Lallemand took the packing in house. It's now vacuum sealed and I've never had problems with it since they repackaged it.
  20. 1 point
    Brewer

    basic mead...upsate

    An alternative is to dilute your mead with some water or apple juice (apple juice and honey makes what is known as a cyser). I guess my concern is that at a starting gravity of 1.150 that is a great deal of dense liquid for the yeast to transfer through their cell walls (through osmosis) the nutrients they need and the food they require (the food being sugars from the honey) to effectively ferment the must. My meads (2.5 - 3 lbs of honey to make 1 gallon (plus) of mead) generally hit 1.000 after about 2 weeks or so. If you really want high ABV then meads and wines may not be what you are looking for...But mead is not a spirit. A good mead (dry or sweet) is likely to be around 12-14 % ABV. Beyond 14 % the mead (in my opinion) is distinctly out of balance.. And above about 15% ABV you might want to think about aging the mead for years to remove some of the alcoholic heat... But yer pays yer money and yer takes yer chance
  21. 1 point
    JoshR

    basic mead...upsate

    You can finish the sugar out by repitching a higher ABV tolerant yeast such as the EC1118, which will get up to 18% or (my choice) the K1-V116, which will get you to 20%. Keep in mind though, that the higher the ABV, the hotter the mead will taste. Also, regardless of the yeast you use, it is highly recommended that you add nutrients to the must as honey is devoid of nutrients for the yeast. The best nutrients to use should be high in nitrogen, such as diammonium phosphate (DAP).
  22. 1 point
    Don't be discouraged if your first beer isn't very good. Give it another week, or another. The lighter flavor extracts from MrB tend to need more aging because off flavors are simply more noticeable against light beers. Those beers may not hit their stride till week 6-8.
  23. 1 point
    You'll find that experienced brewers around here will recommend fermenting for three weeks at around 65 degrees, then conditioning in the bottles for four weeks at room temperature (70 degrees or so). Then refrigerate for three days only what you plan to drink in the immediate future. Following these guidelines will help you make even better beer. Welcome to a great hobby, and to these forums. Enjoy!
  24. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Experimenting with Yeast

    Mr. Beer yeast is not S-05. S-04 and Notty are not the same. Temp is fine for either. 2.5 gallons may overflow, 2.13 gallons rarely does.
  25. 1 point
    HoppySmile!

    Bottling bucket and bottling wand.

    yes I think you will like the batch priming, I do, it takes out some of the head aches/ time to prime the bottles, especially when u increase the amount of beer you're producing. for a 5 gallon recipe it's recommended 5 oz. of corn sugar I always add a little extra just in case. and since I have so many of those darn 20 oz. ice bottles, after I remove the pan from the stove I set it in the sink with 4 ice bottles surrounding it, then gradually fill the sink until the pan is just slightly floating. walk away for 20-30 minutes maybe, if you're concerned with the temp of the sugar going into the wort, u can always use a thermometer. I just finger touch and if it feels slightly cool, I pour it in then add wort while slowly mixing occasionlly.
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