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Showing most liked content on 03/19/2018 in all areas

  1. 7 likes
    So here you see the dilemma. I recommend the long established 3-4 that brewers on this forum developed via trial and error years back. Then BDawg62 recommends 3 weeks. Who's right? Both of us. Remember, beer is tasted by people. Your expertise, and ability to taste differs from every other human being on the planet. In fact, there are people that are genetically predisposed to discern (or not) certain flavors. Let me state that clearer - some people have an inability to taste certain things, and others have an overly sensitive taste for certain things. I know an expert - an Advance Cicerone (there are 80 in the world and only 16 Master Cicerones) that has an inability to detect a skunked beer (3-MBT, a chemical created by ultraviolet light when a beer is exposed to sun or ultraviolet light). Most people notice it immediately. When driving down the road, if a skunk sprays, my friend says "who is roasting coffee out here?", because that is how they detect that smell. So what you think is a good beer I may think is a bad beer. Or vice-versa. That variation in ability to taste, combined with expertise, combined with preferences, make this a hobby where a rank amateur can brew a fairly good beer on their first few attempts, but an expert taster would list 20 flaws that the beer had. Who's right? Both of them. Why go 4 weeks? The issue here is that you are a new brewer. IMO, new brewers should follow established guidelines (notice my referenced post says guidelines, not rules). Why? Because if you don't, and your results taste lousy, then you'll quit the hobby. No one collects stats on the dropout rate in this hobby, but I believe it's well above nearly all other hobbies. There is zero reason for a new brewer to only go 3 weeks, assuming you eliminate the "well I want to see the change from 3 weeks to 4 weeks for myself". Few beers are better in 3 weeks than 4 weeks (a heavily dry-hopped beer would be one exception). As far as degrading over time, that's a fact. HOWEVER, 90%+ can't tell the difference. I'm down to 9+ cases of beer, having not brewed in a year, trying to use my inventory. My freshest beer was bottled last May. My oldest beer was bottled over 2 years ago. Tastes fine. Would it taste better fresh? Sure. But it tastes fine. A new brewer doesn't need to freak out about "old beer". Keep it in the basement, in a closed box or closet, and it's fine. Whatever fits in a frig is great, ONCE you reach the optimal conditioning time.
  2. 6 likes
    I carbonate every batch at 76 for 3 weeks then I store at my basement temps which are in the low 60s. I have goofed and had a batch get above 90 for a couple of days during carbonation (actually won a medal for that beer). Carbonation temps don't have the same effect on your beer that high fermentation temps do.
  3. 5 likes
    If you've done some of the PM recipes from Mr. Beer and still find them meh, you might have some pretty high expectations. It really depends on what you mean by "eye-popping" and "mouthwatering". To me, that sounds like a flavorful beer in terms of malt and hops. If it's ABV that causes the aforementioned effects, maybe you try some of the bigger beer recipes Mr. Beer has to offer. Going off the beaten path to make a high-ABV concoction usually doesn't end well. You will have a beer with a lot of bite but little taste. One thing I've learned to appreciate is a brewer's ability to mask the alcohol bite with a great malt backbone and a bouquet of hops. I recommend doing a little research on a clone of a commercial beer that makes your eyes water and mouth pop. You can usually assimilate a recipe using Mr. Beer ingredients. In the end, do what makes you happy. Live and learn. You may just stumble upon a great recipe. Just make sure to keep thorough notes.
  4. 4 likes
    For those disappointed by the short sale - look at this at Target https://www.target.com/bp/Mr. Beer St P's Stout $13.99 Oktoberfest Lager $11.79 Free shipping over $35. I missed the Mr. B sale but I got 2 St Ps and an Oktoberfest here with free ship. for $42. Avg. $14 per can. Mind you these probably come with no booster or LME. So that lessens the deal. But I am happy with this.
  5. 3 likes
    Sadly, the LBK I've been using since May 2015 saw its demise yesterday, with a little hairline crack underneath the spigot allowing a small amount of liquid to seep out. I used it for about 33 batches so I can't complain. On to the next one! Kevin
  6. 3 likes
    Personally ive never seen a 10 degree rise. Maybe 3-4 max. Im usually fighting to raise my temps as high as possible for my saisons. Now having an LBK overflow, that’s possible with any batch. But if you brew in fear, youll never become a brewing guru.
  7. 3 likes
    The NWPA is pretty good as is. The most I would add is some LME/DME or hops, specifically the latter. I brewed this one yesterday, adding in El Dorado hops for 5 minutes and will dry hop a week before bottling. I discourage any other adjunct.
  8. 3 likes
    Not only do I live in a 175 year old house, we have cats. I use foil caps over each bottle to keep anything airborne out. The foil caps are only large enough to cover the top of the bottles and snug down the sides to hold them in place. I sanitize and cover. I remove the cap to put the conditioning/carb tablets in and recover. After setting the stage I get the LBK and bottling wand set up and begin bottling. I remove the foil cap, fill then recover with the foil cap. Doing it this way also shortens the length of time my bottling wand is exposed. The filled, foil covered, and still uncapped bottles are placed into cardboard 6 pack cartons. As I cap, I pull out a bottle, remove the foil cover, cap then set it back into the six pack carton. Most 1/2 liter bottles will also still fit into the 6 pack pockets.
  9. 3 likes
    Apparently there's a much >zero reason to combine them. (I knew MRB had a recipe along those lines but hadn't had a chance to search for it. Thanks for sharing it...and poking the bear.)
  10. 3 likes
    why do you use aluminum foil? I have a system i have one of those pepsi trays that holds bottles i got from a gas station just ask, many times theyll give you a couple just to get them out of their way, I set all my bottles up in the tray and then put all my carb drops in and only then do i take the keg out this way it is bottle after bottle and there is no time for it to warm up and yes u am using a wand now. The ray also come super useful in conditioning storage
  11. 3 likes
    Sounds similar to this, if you add some hops: https://www.mrbeer.com/gila-monster-black-ipa-recipe
  12. 3 likes
    wow I am inpressed how asking for simple advice about beer yeast can open such dark and ugly doors. There for a minute i thought this was Reddit.
  13. 3 likes
    Patience BDawg. Don't forget patience. Too many try to rush through the process. Too many try to skip steps in learning the process. (editors note: dkristof1007 is trying to emulate RickBeer and simultaneously poke the bear)
  14. 3 likes
    Thanks guys! I have glanced at all the sites and forums, but will certainly read deeper into this. I am still a newbie only brewed like 12 batches now, but start mixing hops into some of the blends to get flavors that remind me of europe before i leave. I am currently experimenting with the Wiesbier now. Started with the normal recipe nothing added. Now making the wild wheat to see how that compares. I am also waiting on the Wild Wheat with Hollentrau hops to compare the tastes. Both were brewed at flameout. After I find a good wiesbeir replica, I am moving on to the Belgians because not being able to drive there and pick up the Trappist beers will be hard for me. Now, i now I wont be able to make make exacts, just looking for something the mimics (reminds) of a Belgian blonde, brun, and quad. Thanks again!
  15. 2 likes
  16. 2 likes
    @BDawg62 and @Creeps McLane, nervous Nelly about temp rise in high krausen! Guess I'm figuring with the honey in addition to the hme, and yeah cautious, not having used saison before, I figured that I could get a 10 degree swing in wort temp. Lack of experience makes me want to err on side of caution. WARNING, DANGER, WILL ROBINSON !
  17. 2 likes
  18. 2 likes
    Danstar Belle Saison Yeast loves the heat, don't worry about temperature.
  19. 2 likes
    @Creeps McLane , well ran behind by about a week because of the appendicitis surgery, but this recipe was brewed this morning and now in the LBK. I did use the honey and pitched the Belle Saison yeast at wort temp of 70F. OG was 1.060 and got it in a large cooler with a towel under it and a half bottle of frozen water at the opposite end. Would like to have that temp a little bit lower for the first 3 days or so. Hops I used were 1/2 oz. of Falconers Flight.
  20. 2 likes
    OK, let me try to clear up some of your confusion. There is no way to clear up your confusion, every beer will need a different length of time for conditioning. There are many factors that go into what effects conditioning time for a beer. 1. Your process - if you made any mistakes during brewing, ie... ferment too warm, pitch too warm, not enough oxygen in the wort. All of these can have a different effect on your beer and the time it takes to condition out these flaws. 2. The Original Gravity of the beer - higher gravity beers require more conditioning time (a 1.080 beer will need about 6 months) 3. The yeast you used - some yeast will put out flavor esters that depending on #1 above may or may not condition out. 4. The ingredients of the beer - too much here to even get into (spices and flavorings both add and subtract from conditioning time) To sum it all up do what I do. 1. Carbonate your beers in a warm spot (75 degrees) for 3 weeks. 2. Move your beers to a cool spot in your house (my basement right now is 59 degrees) 3. Put one in the fridge for 3 days and then taste the results. 4. If you are satisfied (rarely happens) then they are properly conditioned. 5. Continue step 3 at regular intervals. When you have a beer that is as good as you hoped and you have the refrigerator space, then put the balance of the batch in there and enjoy. If you don't have that refrigerator space, then know that they may improve more but they may also start to degrade. In any case it is time to drink them in earnest. Dawg
  21. 2 likes
    The Star San bottle that I have has a measuring reservoir. So I squeeze it to the right amount, in my case 1/2 oz. for 2 1/2 gallons. It makes it very easy to use.
  22. 2 likes
    You will get a combined ABV, 3.1 + 3.1, plus the booster (1.1) for a total of 7.3 or so bland beer.
  23. 1 like
    No, not fear, lol, I've already brewed my worst fear with my first batch, green apple Oktoberfest! But your recipe said not to let it get over 77, and I'm pretty sure whether I read it here or in Palmers that in high krausen there could be 6-8 and up to 10 degree increase over ambient. Wort temp showing steady 67 right now and I'm feeling okay in that range.
  24. 1 like
    Lol, you are right but still a bit nervous about how much the temp rises during high krausen! I know I'll be perving this one for a few days.
  25. 1 like
    Excellent, but remember, this is your “i dont need temp control batch”. Dont stress about the temp unless you really are opposed to saison yeast esters. Real happy you used the falconers flight. I think youll be really pleased with this one
  26. 1 like
    Plastic jugs develop stress fractures during use. I rotate mine out at least once per month because the mess just isn't worth it. For what it's worth, 3 teaspoons = 1 Tablespoon for those who only want to mix 2.5 gallons
  27. 1 like
    I realize this was posted over a year ago but, I'll toss in my two cents anyway. If I want to have a tasty brew, I start with one of those two MB HME and build from there. At 16 I was in Bamberg, Germany and was enthralled with Rauchbier. At $4/bottle the memories they bring back are expensive ( one reason I homebrew😉). At my local HBS, I purchase 1 lb of beech smoked Rauchmalt to mash and lager yeast. My family named it Witches' Tears. I do the same using flaked rye because I loved the pumpernickle Roggenbiers.