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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/06/2018 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Bonsai & Brew

    Saison de Frais

    Bottled at FG 1.002 and 8.3% ABV.
  2. 2 points
    Bonsai & Brew

    5.3

    This is what your mash pH should be to maximize amylase enzymatic efficiency, reduce astringency, improve clarity, increase hop utilization and prevent off-flavors. I have never measured mine. Cheers.
  3. 2 points
    MRB Tim

    Making a java or coffee stout

    You have a great sense of timing, we just posted a new blog about that: https://www.mrbeer.com/blog/brew-beer-with-coffee/
  4. 2 points
    MRB Tim

    Safale US-05 vs Safale S-33

    Hey Mic, S-33 and US-05 are about as different as you can get. S-33 is a very low attenuator, meaning it leaves a relatively high amount of residual sugar. so you'll lose a lot of sweetness with US-05. That's neither a good nor a bad thing, it just depends on what you like.
  5. 1 point
    Shrike

    Bottle didn’t carbonate

    Fixed it for you. 😜😃
  6. 1 point
    JRCasualBrewer

    Bottle didn’t carbonate

    Mic Todd i don’t recall getting distracted but I can’t guarantee I didn’t. I know I was struggling with the wet spoon (from sanitizing). Fingers crossed.
  7. 1 point
    Pantooka

    Making a java or coffee stout

    The real winner, as far as I’m concerned, at a recent beer tasting, was Java Stout by Santa Fe Brewing. Awesome beer and relatively high ABV. How can I make something as coffee-good? I added cold deep dark coffee to Double Black Diamond Stout: really good, but a little light on the java. Maybe I was too timid. BTW, this beer has aged 6 months and is SO good. I am learning that patience has great tasting rewards!
  8. 1 point
    Cato

    Safale US-05 vs Safale S-33

    If it was me I'd use the US-05. I've only used the MB yeast once or twice but wasn't as happy with it as the US-05 and others. S-33 I've never used. Good idea to keep a small selection of yeasts on hand in a ziplock in the fridge. I always keep some back ups like US-05, 04, and Nottingham. Those will generally suffice for the majority of my brews.
  9. 1 point
    Shrike

    Bottle didn’t carbonate

    I "re-carb" beers quite often: thoroughly wash hands, unscrew cap, drop in two Domino's Dots, re-cap. If you're using regular sugar, sanitize whatever utensils you'll be using that will come into contact with the sugar or bottle.
  10. 1 point
    Shrike

    Making a java or coffee stout

    I use espresso-ground coffee and cold-steep it overnight. I add one shot to each bottle at bottling. To me the espresso grind gives a better coffee flavor.
  11. 1 point
    Mic Todd

    Bottle didn’t carbonate

    I can't speak specifically to this but in my 1st-ever batch, I too was disappointed in the carbonation - until I realized (learned from guys here) that I was conditioning them in too cool and environment (~65F). Once I moved the bottles out into the warmer areas of my home (72F) the carbonation began in earnest. For that reason, I gave the bottles an extra week of conditioning (4 weeks) before I set them to age in the cooler area. Result was very satisfactory. The beer had pretty good head and definitely was more carbonated than I thought. Also, the longer they sat (after the 4 weeks) the better they carbonated. You could try that. Don't give up on it, tho. 😃
  12. 1 point
    Bonsai & Brew

    5.3

    Going forward, I'll be diluting my well water 1:1 with R/O water from my workplace -- gotta get my residual alkalinity down!
  13. 1 point
    zorak1066

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    let beer sit??? do you make a cake and leave it untouched like some kind of work of art? lol. the longest i let your average abv beer 'age' is 3 weeks. if it is a high abv like a ris i go about 2 months. homebrew and aging: the longer you let it sit malts tend to come forward and hops tend to mellow. you'll eventually reach a 'sweet spot' where the flavors of hop and malt balance perfectly. since taste is entirely subjective, you have to experiment for yourself. wheat beers and saisons are typically best young. heavy beers like stouts and ipa's benefit from some time. barleywines and other high octane beers really benefit from a lot of time. the reason for this is high octane beers tend to have produced fusel alcohols while fermenting. aging them allows the fusels to mellow out and the flavors to blend.
  14. 1 point
    Cato

    Grain Mill Problems 😞

    LOL, I had issues of my own today. Learning curve that its better to have the roller spinning prior to pouring grain in. Drill just torqued the HD bucket and the mill onto the table and about 8 oz of dark wheat grain on the garage floor. Of course it went everywhere so it was time to reboot and clean up. Ground down the flat spot on the shaft as it had some rough edges to it that made the drill wobble a bit. The factory setting seemed to be fine for the wheat kernels which were smaller and harder than the pilsener that I tried after that. It definitely crushed the grain finer than my suppliers crush. I didn't run but about half a pound of each through it but it works and it was smoother for me to put a couple large clamps on to stabilize against torque, and I kept a steady feed of grain but not too much at once for now. I'll check to see how fine it comes out running those grains back through again.
  15. 1 point
    I'll have to check out the yeast harvesting. As for mead, it's something I've been curious about. Heard it can be harder than beer to get right so you'll have to let me know how your first batch turns out, was it worth the wait? My LHBS has all the mead stuff, but right now I'm focusing on beer. I tried making a beer with blueberries, none of the blueberry came through (like Rickbeer said, blueberries are a weak fruit). So I caved in & tried a Dead & Berried Saison tonight & was not disappointed. In fact was pleasantly surprised that I enjoyed it so much. Hint of boysenberry, hint of sour. I can't help but tweak the recipes a bit, and I added 2.7 oz Carapils for body, I used 12 oz of wheat DME that I had on hand, and 1 Mr Beer booster, at flame out 0.3 oz of Tettnanger hops (I have a surplus of these for some reason) & used Safale BE 134 yeast as I'm not sure I'm a big fan of Belle Saison. So the end result was very very tasty, dry and tangy, somewhat reminds me of a lambic of course not anywhere near the mouth-puckering sour that a lambic is. Ha, that is funny about Okotoberfest! Same here, my dad really enjoyed that one, so I gave a lot of them to him. Go figure!
  16. 1 point
    scouterbill

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    I still have 9 bottles of Belgian Spiced Ale (the 2013 Winter Season Ale) brewed in September of 2016. The last one that I tried (about a month ago) was still amazing. It all depends on the style. An IPA that old wouldn't taste anything like it did after 4-6 weeks, if it was even worth drinking at all.
  17. 1 point
    kedogn

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    Mr. Owl! Man, that takes me back to Saturday Morning Cartoons when I was a kid. #SimplerTimes!
  18. 1 point
    kedogn

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    The longest I ever let one sit was just over 4 years. It was a Bewitched Amber and well... it was horrible! I will also say that it sitting around that long was on accident, as we had moved and that box didn't get discussed until after our next move
  19. 1 point
    DEFbrewer

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    I'm like the tootsie pop owl in the 70's commercial. I don't let them sit much longer than the suggested conditioning time. I heard from the forum, here, that the yeast continue conditioning the brew as it sits in the bottle. So mouthfeel has a lot to do with it. Start with the recommended conditioning time. If the taste isn't yet right, condition another 2 weeks, and so on. Glass bottles and oxygen barrier PET bottles will let the brew remain good for a year or more, PET bottles up to a year i think.
  20. 1 point
    Shrike

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    I have seven bottles left of Lock, Stock, & Bourbon Barrel Stout that I bottled 25 months ago. Those are my oldest.
  21. 1 point
    Cato

    longest you have let bottles sit?

    My dark beers with higher gravity condition the longest. I've tried them at 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks, but 3-4 months has been more the sweet spot for those. My IPA and pale ales that are a bit hop forward I'll start on as soon as they carb up, which is about 3 weeks. Their best when the hops are fresh.
  22. 1 point
    Bonsai & Brew

    Saison de Frais

    I did add the Sorachi Ace dry-hop per @Creeps McLane's recommendation for that extra bit of 🍋🍋🍋 flavor and aroma.
  23. 1 point
    zorak1066

    Mad Scientist Brews

    my favorite franken brew experience... after boiling cabbage i had about 3 gallons of cabbage water.. lovely blue. i steeped some apple jacks cereal and grapenuts with some carapils. I used this with malt additions to make what was supposed to be a cream ale i think. dont have the recipe. i think it was more like 'lets see what happens if i do this...'. and it was long ago. my dusty brain cant recall so good. it started off very weird. it's hard to describe the flavor.. but in fairness as it aged the pilsner flavor was more forward than the weird. i would not recommend using cabbage water in beer.
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