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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/17/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Creeps McLane

    Upcoming Brewing Schedule

    Im gonna brew a saison, shocking I know. but Im gonna ferment in primary with saison yeast and lacto and then secondary with some brett. Its gonna be a long process but itll be worth it. Challenge is to get plenty of dextrins in there for the brett to chew on. No matter what, @Big Sarge is sure to receive a bottle or 6. Also I gotta get some amber lager figured out for September when I go visit the badlands and @Bonsai & Brew. Might sound crazy, but Im gonna also possibly pick up some oak spirals from Austin Homebrew Supply for the sasion / lacto / breet beer. Id like to get some oak tannins in there as well for added body. Might ship those to my inlaws in TX while im down there visiting them and @Jdub. Maybe bring back some Jester King beer and propagate some yeast for that beer. who knows. anythings possible.
  2. 4 points
    Creeps McLane

    When to use a "Krausen Kollar"

    Lol, man, let me tell you. Fruited beers are tough. A kettle soured fruited beer is great, but trying to balance the phenols of a saison with the phenols and tannins of some berries is my newest challenge. I guess theres a reason classic lambic brewers age their beers on fruit for months. Trying to rush a fruit beer is proving to be difficult but Im having a lot of fun along the way, Plus since I don't eat much fruit, I figure Im getting some sort of health benefits for drinking my fruits.
  3. 4 points
    Jdub

    Advice for Brewing "That Voodoo....."

    maybe make some cookies and have a bake sale? LOL
  4. 4 points
    yeast rafts take on many forms. when i use us04 i get floaty tan/orange colored clumps of yeast at multiple levels within the wort. some topside. some below. it's normal. yeast sometimes link hands and sing kumbaya for reasons only yeast know. sour producing infections look like shrike's pics. when those snotty white clumps join up they form a 'pellicle'. it's like a semi-hard protective fingernail like scale to seal off the wort below and allow the bacteria to eat all your lovely alcohol. i had a lacto bacillus infection in a pumpkin weis that looked like pic 2. big snotty white/grey bubbles. there is a difference between 'sour' and 'tart' that many people get confused on. fermenting too hot produces a cidery green apple tartness that some perceive as 'sour'. true sour is more like eating unflavored, unsweetened yogurt. sour. puckering mouth, pinchy face sour. atomic warhead candy sour. sucking on lemons sour. tart like you get in wheat beers, is more like semi ripe cherry sharpness of flavor. or perhaps real cranberry in nature. acetobacter infections produce vinegar flavors. the more alcohol the bug converts to acetic acid, the more intense the off taste until it gets so strong you can actually damage your mouth. brett-c infections produce the sour similar to a lacto infection. people intentionally brew with brett c to make various sour beers that i am not a fan of myself. infections arent that common if you exercise even the slightest good hygiene when brewing. there's an ancient thread here somewhere about Mashani's cat butt ale. lol... it's a classic.
  5. 4 points
    Yep, you had yeast rafts. No need to apologize about all the questions. You're going through what everyone on here has gone through, an acute case of B.B.A.: Beginner Brewer Anxiety.
  6. 3 points
    BDawg62

    When to use a "Krausen Kollar"

    If you are new to brewing and have the 2 gallon MRB fermenter with the Kollar, I would use it. It is there and as a new brewer it just makes sense to use it. It will not hurt anything and will definately make sure your Krausen doesn't overflow.
  7. 3 points
    BDawg62

    All-grain Brew Day

    Stretch, They keep the instructions simple because they want newbies to brew year around. There are few if any places in the majority of households with a dark place that has ambient temperatures around 60-f in the middle of July. That is why you need some way of keeping your brew cold and if that were in the instructions, the majority of newbies would say it is too expensive to deal with brewing this kit. Thus either never brewing or returning it to where it was purchased. In either case, MRB would not receive any future sales from that customer. Remember that most MRB kits are given as gifts and the so the actual brewer is not actually out any money if he never brews it or fails at brewing it. The fallout rate of new brewers is high already and further complicating the instructions would raise the rate even more (wow, I sound like @RickBeer) There is only a small percentage of people who brew these kits that ever join the forum and work to improve their first bad brew. Congratulations to you for doing this, you will in time become a better brewer because you are here and asking the tough questions.
  8. 3 points
    Brown sugar contains molasses, which is not good in beer, it does tend to leave a licorice type of taste. Regular white sugar will dry the beer and not leave those flavors behind. You could use 3/4 cup of honey but the flavor of honey goes away and sugar has the same effect without the cost. Corn sugar could be substituted but may leave a little sweetness behind because it is not 100% fermentable.
  9. 3 points
    Jdub

    Advice for Brewing "That Voodoo....."

    i would second @Shrike's comments. i brewed that recipe and did not like it. If I were to brew it again, I would skip the brown sugar and find another adjunct, like corn sugar, or honey to sub for it. I have a can of BAA and will give it another shot at some point.
  10. 3 points
    Shrike

    Advice for Brewing "That Voodoo....."

    I did not care for the final result when I made it. Brown sugar can add a flavor that some people taste as licorice. If I were to brew it again I'd follow the instructions but only use 1/2 cup of light brown sugar.
  11. 3 points
    Shrike

    Problems with Mr Beer Website

    I was getting errors with trying to order on Monday. Used the online form to ask for help and got no response. As MRB customer service is usually on the ball I figured something was up.
  12. 3 points
    StretchNM

    All-grain Brew Day

    Well, I just checked OG before pitching the yeast. 1.022 Oh well, maybe it'll be near beer. To say I'm disappointed would be misrepresenting my true feelings. I know I did everything per instructions, from sanitizing, to boiling to hopping, to cooling... The only thing that occurs to me now is that, after I added my 70-F water to the wort to reach the one-gallon mark, I did not stir or shake it up. I just relied on the turbulence I observed on pouring the water in to think that it was mixed enough. After pitching the yeast, I did shake and stir well, but by then it was too late for the hydrometer, and even if not, it is now. Anyway, my first all-grain batch is in the cooler. But again, on The Lighter Side©, as I was cleaning up my wife comes home and says there's a box on the porch for me. A new LBK, That Voodoo...., and Oktoberfest is inside. A happy ending.
  13. 3 points
    zorak1066

    Boiling Yeast?

    yes. yes. yes and no. old or unwanted yeast can be boiled to kill it. i start timing when it reaches a low boil and then let it cook for about 5 minutes or so. then i flame out, cover and cool. alternatively you can add it to your boil and cook like that. you want the old yeast killed especially if you are brewing using a yeast with a desired flavor profile. you dont want any of the crud yeast surviving and potentially out-eating the good yeast. wort has tons of nutrients all on its own. if the yeast are relatively fresh (and you pitch enough) and not subjected to stress like heat/cold/or very high gravity they will do just fine. adding nutrient in the form of dead cells is like serving dessert at the start of a meal. the yeast will love you for it.. but will tuck into the dead cells or other nutrient first before tucking into the wort. any time i add nutrient be it yeast , raisins, sugar, etc... i get a little lag time added then the yeast go nuts. so absolutely not necessary in most cases. when i use tired old yeast out of necessity, or i am making something with a very high o.g. i add nutrient. i will also add a little more toward the midpoint of a high grav fermentation. example: making a belgian dubbel or trippel. these typically call for beet sugar additions. i do step feedings to keep the yeast from pigging out on junk food before they start working on the wort. the staged feedings keep them active and happy, and relatively stress free.
  14. 3 points
    RickBeer

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    Hint - it's not a wheat, because you're using 2-Row BARLEY... 😉 It's not a lager, because you're using S-04 yeast, which is an ale yeast... 😕 If it's just 1.5 pounds of barley and Goldings hops, uses S-04 which is an English ale yeast, it's likely a _________
  15. 3 points
    Shrike

    carbo drops vs sugar

    What temperature are the bottles sitting at while carbonating? It's recommended to do a full three weeks at room temperature, meaning around 70-75F, to completely carb your brews. If it's cooler than that, it'll take longer. I've never used the drops. I've always used sugar. Now I stick with Domino's Dots. 1 sugar cube = 1/2 tsp. I use one for 12oz bottles and two for pint and 500ml bottles. Simple and fool-proof.
  16. 2 points
    RickBeer

    All-grain Brew Day

    You say it like that's a bad thing? 😀
  17. 2 points
    Mic-S

    Advice for Brewing "That Voodoo....."

    I made this beer back in December (27th) and instead of the brown sugar I subbed one cup of agave nectar. I don't know how to tell you how it was different from the recipe because I have only made this one batch - but it was good. lol That's about the limit of my descriptions...good/bad...dark/light...sweet/bitter....hoppy/not... but I think the agave was a better choice than what the brown sugar might have been. Low abv, tho. Just under 6.0%. Drinking the last of it (except for my 3 archived bottles) now.
  18. 2 points
    Cato

    Upcoming Brewing Schedule

    Lol, ferried up and down the stairs quite a bit today, but good exercise for my knee. Weighed grains for my Mystic Red Irish ale and should get supplies in for an Altbier recipe tomorrow. Rigged up a long extension for my IC, so I won't have to move the kettle off the workbench while chilling the wort. My Red ale will be my first without roasted barley. Using Cara Aroma for most of the color, plus some melanoiden. Going to be an interesting red, and malty. Golden Promise, CaraAroma, Carafoam, and Melanoiden. Hops, Saaz for light bittering and some Cascade for aroma/flavor. Yeast- Nottingham. 3 gal. My Altbier, I'll just do an LBK batch size as this one will be a bit different from my last Altbier, but will be fun to compare to see which I like better. I hit a homerun last time, I thought, but this variation has some interesting different grist players, so........
  19. 2 points
    I agree with the posters above, I did not like it and if I brewed it again would brew with cane sugar instead of brown sugar. Cane sugar would be a 1 : 1 substitute.
  20. 2 points
    RickBeer

    All-grain Brew Day

    Since it was a kit, with crappy instructions, let's forget for the moment that it wasn't enough grain. There is a tremendous learning point here for you. You spent time determining your boil off rate, and figuring out sparge volumes, and using a calculator to figure out how much liquid would be in your pot prior to boiling to come to the right amount of liquid to fill your fermenter. Then, you added a half gallon of water, or more, to fill the fermenter. That is your major learning point. You should have had to add nothing, or virtually nothing. You basically watered down your beer. A second point to learn from is what's a mash. A mash is sitting the grains in the right temp water for an hour. Not stirring constantly. Every time you stirred, with the lid off, you lowered the temperature. You should be mashing in a pot with the lid on, and the flame off, and stirring at most every 15 minutes. Spend some time reading about BIAB. Go to http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/2010/09/qbrew-homebrewers-recipe-calculator.html and download QBrew and the update file and learn how to use it. Brewing is about learning. None of us did a successful all grain batch the first time. Or the second.
  21. 2 points
    BDawg62

    All-grain Brew Day

    I would say that you didn't really have enough grains for the recipe, even with good efficiency you would have been in the 1.030 range. They didn't have the correct crush or because you put them in a sack also contributed to the mash being inefficient. It will not be a potent beer but it will at least give you a start in the processes for all grain.
  22. 2 points
    Nickfixit

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    For the Mr Beer with partial mash, I use water about 165 or 170 deg (my kettle does that ) and it come out in the pot in the 145-155 range generally. Then I sit it on the warming ring on the stove. IT will stay between 140-160 - not really accurate for careful all grain work, but I think for my PM it seems to work.
  23. 2 points
    i read your question and you said you saw the bubbles at bottling time. i assume you let it ferment for 3 weeks. did you cold crash? i have had yeast rafts before as well. cold crash and they will most likely disappear. cider taste could be extract twang. i have experienced that, even when fermenting at low temps. just the way it is sometimes. good luck and keep brewing.
  24. 2 points
    Cider-like taste and sour are very different. Often too high a temperature during fermentation will result in a cider taste. Sour is like a sour pickle (minus the salt).
  25. 2 points
    RickBeer

    carbo drops vs sugar

    Actually, the recommendation is 3-4. 3 weeks fermenting with wort temps at 65, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher. Then 3 days or more in the frig. If you go less than 4 weeks, or less than 3 days, you won't have the same level of carbonation. The 3 days is needed for the CO2 to absorb back into the beer.
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