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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/16/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Yep, you had yeast rafts. No need to apologize about all the questions. You're going through what everyone on here has gone through, an acute case of B.B.A.: Beginner Brewer Anxiety.
  2. 3 points
    Shrike

    carbo drops vs sugar

    What temperature are the bottles sitting at while carbonating? It's recommended to do a full three weeks at room temperature, meaning around 70-75F, to completely carb your brews. If it's cooler than that, it'll take longer. I've never used the drops. I've always used sugar. Now I stick with Domino's Dots. 1 sugar cube = 1/2 tsp. I use one for 12oz bottles and two for pint and 500ml bottles. Simple and fool-proof.
  3. 2 points
    BDawg62

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    Also, please note that if you only have a 1 gallon jug to ferment this recipe in and you put 1 gallon of wort in that jug, you will end up with a mess. Also, I have brewed several beers with a 1 gallon volume. These are test batches that I do on the stove when I don't want to get out all of my equipment for a recipe that I don't know how good it will be anyway. They typically start with 2 to 3# of grain and my wort collected before the boil is usually a little more than 2 gallons. I boil very aggressively and boil off about 1 gallon during my hour boil. The instructions for your kit, aside from the line 3 and 4 duplication, are not great but they are not totally incorrect either. These instructions were written by an experienced all grain brewer with an actual mash tun or a means of straining the grains to separate them from the wort.
  4. 2 points
    i read your question and you said you saw the bubbles at bottling time. i assume you let it ferment for 3 weeks. did you cold crash? i have had yeast rafts before as well. cold crash and they will most likely disappear. cider taste could be extract twang. i have experienced that, even when fermenting at low temps. just the way it is sometimes. good luck and keep brewing.
  5. 2 points
    Cider-like taste and sour are very different. Often too high a temperature during fermentation will result in a cider taste. Sour is like a sour pickle (minus the salt).
  6. 2 points
    RickBeer

    carbo drops vs sugar

    Actually, the recommendation is 3-4. 3 weeks fermenting with wort temps at 65, 4 weeks carbonating and conditioning at 70 or higher. Then 3 days or more in the frig. If you go less than 4 weeks, or less than 3 days, you won't have the same level of carbonation. The 3 days is needed for the CO2 to absorb back into the beer.
  7. 2 points
    Creeps McLane

    Upcoming Brewing Schedule

    Switching my regular saison hopping schedule to match that of noble king. So on sunday im gonna do one mash, two boils, three beers. IPA, Hoppy saison and a fruited hoppy saison. This is the last of competition brews for this year as of right now.
  8. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    The calculator will calculate at the bottom a strike temp. This is the water temp that you need, with the 70 degree grains, to get to 153. I question that you have only 1 pound of grain. That is insufficient to make beer. You can't take the boil off rate and just use it. 1 gallon of water doesn't boil off 1 1/2 gallons of water... Put a gallon in the pot you will use. Boil for 1 hour. Measure what's left, that's your boil off rate per gallon of water, roughly. I'd suggest your recipe is crap, and question whether it's worth even making. Perhaps you want to contact the company and ask them. You are trying to turn a crappy process into making beer, and we're trying to fix it, and we don't know what you have in front of you. No, you don't sparge a pound of grain with 1.25 gallons of water. No, you don't boil 2.25 gallons and get 1 gallon. No, you don't add 170 degree water to grains and get 153. Not pointing at you - you're working with crap and trying to figure it out. You may want to better understand the BIAB process - https://biabbrewing.com/
  9. 1 point
    StretchNM

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    No, you read it right. The instructions were funky. Ok. I'll do it. Maybe next Monday. Thank you all.
  10. 1 point
    Jdub

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    with a BIAB recipe, you would steep grains in pot 1 and that is also your boil kettle. You would heat water in a separate pot and use all or part of that to sparge with into pot 1. i just meant that you said that the instructions suggested 2 different additional sparge water pots? or that's what i read at least. the grains will absorb some of the water, and some water will boil off too. just try it and see how it goes.
  11. 1 point
    Thank you Shrike. Then you too have looked at my pictures in the first post in this thread and agree with Mr Beer and Rick Beer that those are yeast rafts? I know they look like your last photo ("tons of yeast rafts") but I just want to be sure. Sorry to beat this dead horse so badly - I'm just trying to learn.
  12. 1 point
    Shrike

    Infection Leading to Sour Aftertaste?

    Here's what an infection looks like: Or this: Or this: There are lots more examples. Just DuckDuckGo "Infected Beer Fermenter" and you'll get plenty of photos. Compare those to this example featuring tons of yeast rafts:
  13. 1 point
    StretchNM

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    Well, I plugged data into the calculator - 1 pound of grain at 70-F, in 1 gallon of water steeping at 153-F, and then boiled for 60 minutes (w hops). If I'm reading the Output correctly, it shows that throughout the mash process I will use a total of 2.30 gallons of water..... which increases to 2.38 while mashing and then decreases to 2.25 gallons after the grains are removed and sparged. After a 60 minute boil the wort has been reduced to 1.0 gallons and that's what goes into the fermenter jug. So as per this Kit's instructions (excluding step #4 which I think is an error, except the 170-F temp would be right to allow for heat reduction from addition of the 70-F grains), they are asking me to start with 1 gallon to steep grains for 60 minutes at 152-F, and then add that mixture to 1.25 gallon through sparging (5 qts), leaving me with 2.25 gallons ( less any water retained by the grains). So then approximately 2.25 gallons is reduced to 1 gallon after 60 minutes of boiling. Wow. I would never have guessed that more than a gallon would be lost to evaporation. Is that right? Am I seeing this correctly? Jdub, regarding using a different sparge water pot: why couldn't I just leave the mash water in the first pot, lift the grains out into strainer above that pot, sparge with the 5 quarts from the second pot (and thusly into the first pot)? Is that what you are saying? That using an additional pot is weird? Thank you
  14. 1 point
    Jdub

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    almost all of the all grain mashes that i do, beersmith recommends starting with strike water at 163 deg and then add my room temp grains to get to ~152 deg or so. that's weird suggesting 2 different sparge water pots.
  15. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    If you use the calculator I linked to, it tells you what temp to heat the water to so that when mixed with the grain temp (you take that too), it yields the right temp.
  16. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    In general those are crappy instructions and wrong temps. Without a sack you're going to have a mess. Buy a paint strainer bag at Home Depot, two for a few bucks, and use one. Rinse it out at the end and use it over and over. You generally want to remove grains from flame for the mash, and most people mash around 152. Going up to 160 would be a very different result, as would going down to 145. No idea why they have step 3 at all. Sparging water should not exceed 170. Grains absorb water. The boil will evaporate water. But no, not a gallon or more out of a gallon. There are calculators you can use to figure this out. http://www.biabcalculator.com/
  17. 1 point
    Remove the bottles from the cooler. Once bottled, you want 70 or higher.
  18. 1 point
    Jdub

    Infection Leading to Sour Aftertaste?

    i know exactly what you mean and it sounds like you fermented at a low temp, so you did it right. my 1st was am lager and it had a green apple cider taste. The beers will improve with some of the craft refills. even better are the partial mash recipes. keep it up!
  19. 1 point
    Yeast rafts. Also, don't open LBK to take pictures of wort during fermentation. 3-4. 3 weeks fermentation, with temp of wort around 65. 4 weeks in bottles, temps of 70 or higher. Then refrigerate only what you're ready to drink for 3 days or more, leaving the rest to continue to condition.
  20. 1 point
    Do you ever tire answering this question? LOL. Maybe it's the beer, but do I sense a level of snarkiness in your use of uppercase for the word "PERFECT"?
  21. 1 point
    Shrike

    LME Softpack versus Brewmax Booster

    One thing to consider when adding LME is that the balance of maltiness vs. hoppiness in the final product will be shifted a tad towards malty. To counter this, some people will add a bit of hops at flameout or boil them for a few minutes. Tettnanger, Saaz, or Hallertau are three varieties that complement the style.
  22. 1 point
    @RickBeer I may not be describing it right, it is just a flavor i tasted once before when tasting my beer before crashing. I let it go a few more days and it was fine. But that was a more basic recipe, this is the Howling Red, so maybe I'm just tasting the different hops I've never used before? I don't know. Would rather play it safe. I did just get my hydrometer, I just need to learn how to use it first before trying, haven't had the time to read a bit more about it. Will likely use it for my next brew.
  23. 1 point
    66 is fine, in fact it's PERFECT. If it didn't taste sweet, it's done. It's also ok to go 3 weeks and 5 days. 😉
  24. 1 point
    JoshR

    Hydrometers and Specific Gravity 101

    We recieve many calls and emails here at Mr. Beer on how to use a hydrometer. Many of the hydrometer instructions can be confusing to newbies so I thought I would create this primer on the correct way to use a hydrometer and the explanation of specific gravity. Understanding Your Hydrometer: The hydrometer is a simple instrument that measures the weight (or gravity) of a liquid in relation to the weight of water. Because the relation of the gravity to water is specified (1.000), the resulting measure is called a specific gravity. A hydrometer will float higher in a heavy liquid, such as one with a quantity of sugar dissolved in it, and lower in a light liquid, such as water or alcohol. The average homebrewer has a very keen interest in the amount of sugar dissolved in their wort, for yeast converts sugar into carbon dioxide and alcohol. By knowing how much sugar one started with and ended with, one can easily calculate the resulting alcohol content. There are many variants of the hydrometer. Some have only one scale, some two and some three. The typical hydrometer measures three things: specific gravity (S.G.), potential alcohol (P.A.), and sugar. How To Use Your Hydrometer: It's really pretty easy to use the hydrometer; just follow these simple steps: 1. Sanitize the hydrometer, test jar, and any tools that may come into contact with your wort/beer. 2. Place test cylinder on flat surface. 3. Draw a sample of "clean" wort/beer (Avoid testing samples that contain solid particles, since this will affect the readings.) 4. Fill the test jar with enough liquid to just float the hydrometer - about 80% full. 5. Gently lower the hydrometer into the test jar; spin the hydrometer as you release it, so no bubbles stick to the bottom of the hydrometer (this can also affect readings). 6. Making sure the hydrometer isn't touching the sides of the test jar and is floating freely, take a reading across the bottom of the meniscus (see image below). Meniscus is a fancy word for the curved surface of the liquid. 7. Be sure to take good records of your readings! That's it! Pretty simple, huh? There are a couple of other things you need to know to get an accurate measurement. Most hydrometers are calibrated to give correct readings at 59-60 degrees Fahrenheit. Higher temperatures thin the liquid slightly and result in lower readings than you'd get at the correct temperature. At 70 degrees F., the reading will be 0.001 low. To correct it, add 0.001 to the reading. At 77 degrees F., add 0.002. At 84 degrees F., add 0.003. At 95 degrees F., add 0.005. At temperatures above 95 degrees F., you risk killing your yeast and losing your beer. If you can't remember all that just print out the chart below. Another thing you need to know is that most hydrometers come with three scales. Specific Gravity, Balling, and Brix are the ones that are usually on your hydrometer. Specific Gravity and Brix are the ones that are most used. Sugar can be measured as ounces per gallon, or as degrees Balling, or Brix. Ounces per gallon are measured on a numeric scale in which an S.G. of 1.046 equals 16 oz. (one pound) of sugar per U.S. gallon. Brix is measured as a percentage of sugar by which pure water has a Brix of 0 (or 0% sugar), an S.G. of 1.046 equals a Brix of 11.5 (11.5% sugar), and an S.G. of 1.095 equals a Brix of 22.5 (22.5% sugar). If you have a choice and want to simplify your life, buy a hydrometer that measures sugar by ounces per gallon. That should cover everything you need to know about your hydrometer and how to use it. Here are a few tools that may help: Handy Tools: Brix/SG Conversion Calculator Hydrometer Temperature Adjustment Calculator Cheers!
  25. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Hydrometers and Specific Gravity 101

    This video is very good also. And remember, while you only need one tube, you should buy two hydrometers, because they are known to commit suicide without warning. Also, ABV = OG - FG x 131.25 where OG is your original gravity reading and FG is your final gravity reading.
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