Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/14/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Just send them all to me. I'll sample them and give you an estimated ABV based on experience. 😁
  2. 2 points
    StretchNM

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    Consider the source (me), ok? But why couldn't you add 1/2 or 1 pound of corn syrup? I've seen a brewer do that in absence of another extract. Or honey like Jdub said. @Mic-S, I understand what you want to do - use up some base malt extract and clean out your inventory without ordering anything else (or...maybe without waiting for it to arrive), so it sounds to this rookie like a good time to go all-out mad scientist. Who cares if it doesn't fit within accepted parameters? Get rid of that base extract and 50/50 you get something acceptable. Again, I say, consider the source. And good luck! (StretchNM is not responsible for any mishaps or ruining of beer batches due to improper or unacceptable advice. In fact, he didn't even write this post. I did. signed: his dog, Lucy.)
  3. 1 point
    Mic-S

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    LOL Mic promises not to hold Stretch liable for any explosions, implosions, extrusions or contusions which arise from this advice. Er...I mean Lucy.
  4. 1 point
    StretchNM

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    No dry hopping in this batch, so I guess it is just krausen. Anyway I'm feeling happy at the way my sample tasted so.... I'm optimistic for the outcome. Again though, this beer will probably be very low in alcohol content, IF my measurement for OG was proper and if I had mixed it thoroughly enough before taking the measurement. I didn't take FG measurement because it didn't matter to me unless I had confidence in the original gravity measurement, which I don't. I mean, taking the measurement was easy enough, of course, but then when it was only 1.022 or so, I realized something was wrong. Something more than just a weak wort. SO we'll see. Thank you all for the input and encouragement in this thread.
  5. 1 point
    Cato

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    True dat! Sounds like time to rebuild inventory. I know your down at the end of the line and a long ways from LHBS, but I'm guessing UPS delivers?
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    Bonsai & Brew

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    You could always make a 1 gallon batch of 6% ABV CAL.
  8. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    If you're not adding booster or LME/DME, you're drying the beer out more.
  9. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Full Mash Kit Instructions Faulty

    Not dried out yeast, that's krausen. If you dry hopped, that's hops also.
  10. 1 point
    Shrike

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    You have to ask yourself what you're trying to achieve and what if anything you're willing to alter in the taste of the final product. If you just want to add ABV, the MRB booster packs work great. But anything...yes, anything...with yeast-edible sugar in it will boost your ABV. But almost all of them will also affect the taste of your beer. For example, if you're brewing an IPA you probably don't want to add a bunch of brown sugar and honey to the wort for an ABV boost. Why? Because brewing a dry IPA with a slight licorice taste means the terrorists have won. 😜 You can add more malt in the form LME or DME...but the increase in malt may shift the balance of the beer away from the bitterness and hoppiness that define the IPA style. So hop additions may be desired in order to counter the added malt. So it comes down to why is booster not acceptable in your goal of boosting ABV?
  11. 1 point
    Bonsai & Brew

    Boosting abv without MRB booster?

    Mr. Beer Pale/Golden LMEs work in a pinch to boost ABV. https://www.mrbeer.com/brewmax-lme-softpack-pale
  12. 1 point
    Mic-S

    whirlpool vs flameout hop additions

    All this talk of 'whirlpooling' got my curiosity up so I did google it just to see what you dudes were talking about. Very interesting. But then, there's this: "Whirlpool trivia: Some tea drinkers who use loose tea and no tea ball separate the tea leaves by stirring their tea after the leaves sink to the bottom of the cup to cause the leaves to migrate to the center of the cup. Albert Einstein thought this phenomenon was pretty nifty. He developed a general explanation, called the Teacup Effect, of why pressure changes cause solids to migrate to the center instead of to the perimeter, where it seems like they should migrate. Molson Breweries in Canada is credited with first using the whirlpool in commercial brewing." - Courtesy of Brew Your Own Homebrew magazine. Next cup of tea I brew, I'm trying this out to see if Einstein knew what he was talking about!!
  13. 1 point
    Jdub

    whirlpool vs flameout hop additions

    thanks creeps. yes, i guess i could have googled it before asking on the forum. i found some good info on it too. i know what i'm going to do now.
  14. 1 point
    Cato

    whirlpool vs flameout hop additions

    Sounds the same as an aroma addition to me. I've been doing less dry hops, and more aroma additions at the end of the boil and at flameout. I'll whirlpool by stirring while the chiller does its thing and then squeeze the hop sacks and remove them prior to pumping into the fermenter. Been pretty happy with that method.
  15. 1 point
    Mic-S

    whirlpool vs flameout hop additions

    1st I've heard of it (whirlpooling). Just wanted to say that (so far) my best luck (taste-wise and ease of method) has been to dry hop using a 'hop tea' added either to the keg 5 days before the crash or (even better) straight into the bottle at charging time. So far, ALL the batches I've done this on have turned out well. The two times I hopped the wort in a wort sack, well...let's just say it was less than satisfactory. I know this doesn't exactly answer your specific question, but what I've learned is: do what you think works best, easiest and/or tastiest. It's your beer. 😘
  16. 1 point
    Mic-S

    How many types of beer mugs do you own?

    To which I say: "Waiter, how about a glass of water - and don't bother with the Bud Light."
  17. 1 point
    Jdub

    How many types of beer mugs do you own?

    i'm not very technical. when i want a beer, i open my cabinet, find the nearest glass i'm in the mood for and say that'll do!
  18. 1 point
    RickBeer

    Very Disappointed in Mr. Beer

    Very graceful fall on the sword, @MRB Tim. 😁 You did forgot to say "mea culpa" though... I'd echo that Mr. Beer Customer Service is superb. I'd vouch that you'd find few companies not only trying to help, but then apologizing that their efforts didn't meet your expectations.
  19. 1 point
    Tim F

    Very Disappointed in Mr. Beer

    Hello again Mr Sweat, Your second (tested) replacement, along with the 2 free refills that I promised, are set to be delivered tomorrow. Please message me here for tracking information. I'm sorry that this was insufficient in making up the inconvenience of the wait to you. I apologize also that my communication was insufficient. Tyson was trying to offer a faster solution, not weasel out of sending a replacement, and I'm sorry we created the impression otherwise. Other than having your second replacement tested (which I did) and including $50 of free stuff (which I did), I failed to consider any other ways I could have made it right. I would offer you a refund for the initial kit, had you purchased it from us directly. You are quite correct that our service was poor in this case, and I apologize for however my personal failures negatively impacted your view of this company. I wish you the best of luck in your brewing endeavor, regardless of where you get your supplies.
  20. 1 point
    Darthvin

    Are you a new brewer? Then read this.

    I can't get over how friendly you all are. you long time Brewers know the little tricks and aren't afraid to trade your secrets just to keep good beer brewing. thanks for that advice. I'm going to do that with my 1st batch. Put it in the LBK on August 21, 2017 the day of the Eclipse. and it will be 3 weeks on September 11, hoping to bottle that day . I'm calling it my Eclipse Ale. I sure hope it turns out as nice as the people in this community!
  21. 1 point
    In Pirates of the Caribbean, they say that the code is more guidelines than actual rules (if you don't know what that means, you haven't seen Pirates and you should stop reading this post and just give up life...). A lot of you come on this forum and want to know the RIGHT WAY to brew beer. Well, guess what. There is no right way, no absolute way to brew perfect beer. Mr. Beer recommends certain timing for fermenting and bottling. If you review their website, you'll see different timing in the past, which they then extended more recently. Why? Because while they'd like you to be able to ferment in a week and drink a week later, they likely balanced that old recommendation against how the beer tasted and how many new brewers dropped out, i.e. stopped buying refills. Like a shaving blade manufacturer, Mr. Beer makes more money selling refills (blades) then kits (razors). So more recently they extended the amount of recommended time. Prior to this change, members of the forum started recommending longer times than Mr. Beer, which developed into the "3 - 4" recommendation. Why? Because 3 weeks fermenting works for everything, and 4 weeks in bottles works for nearly everything. Most brewers starting out don't buy a hydrometer to read OG (original gravity) and FG (final gravity), and to determine when their beer is done - or if they do buy one they don't buy it initially. Waiting 3 weeks ensures that your beer is almost guaranteed to be done (there are rare, rare exceptions), that's why we recommend 3 weeks. Can it be ready in 20 days? Yes. 18 days? Yes. 15 days? Maybe. Do you want to be safe and be sure it's done? Then wait the full 21 days. Do you want it ready sooner? Then stop being a cheap SOB and buy a hydrometer and tube and test your beer at 2 weeks, then again 48 hours later, and see if the reading is unchanged and at your expected FG. As to the 4 weeks in the bottle, members of the forum experimented. Some tried a bottle at 1 week, then 2 weeks, then 3 weeks, then 4 weeks, then 5 weeks, ... They learned that at 4 weeks most beers were pretty good, but at 2 weeks most beers weren't so hot (they also learned that they were 4 or 5 bottles down, i.e. their "testing" used up most of their beer). Are there exceptions? Yes. Is there an exact, perfect time for all beers to be ready? No. So what should I do? Wait 4 weeks, and keep your bottles at temps of 68 or higher, but not over 80. Then, put 1 bottle in the frig for at least 3 days, and then drink it. If you like it, refrigerate a few more, leaving the ones you won't drink in 3 days to condition even longer. What do I do for 7 weeks? We really don't care . Go buy some craft beer, go bother your spouse, go lose 20 pounds. But posting 7 times a day "hey, I stuck my head inside my LBK, taste my beer with my tongue, and it seems ready" is not going to make your beer ready any sooner. What you should do is READ. Read the stickies on the forum, read the posts on the forum, read the recommended books (some online for free, some at your library for free). Read, read, and read some more. Is there a correct temperature to ferment at? Yeast has a temperature range that it likes best. Notice the term "likes best". So, if Mr. Beer recommends 68 - 76, that's the range they recommend. Will your beer be ruined at 67 degrees or 77 degrees? No, it's just not optimum. Kind of like filling your tires with 27 pounds of air instead of 32 or 35. Note that the temperature recommended is for the wort (beer) inside the keg, NOT for the air outside in the room. So, either buy a temperature strip from Mr. Beer, or pickup one at your local brewing store or aquarium store, or make sure that the air temp allows for a likely 6 degree increase during active fermentation (or 5 or 4, or 7). I brew at 64 degrees. Before I made a temperature controlled fermentation freezer, I fermented in a basement (like many on the forum) that ranged from 64 - 68 most of the year, meaning the wort likely never exceeded 74 degrees (I say likely because unlike some on the forum, I did not awake every hour and go check it). The key to brewing beer is that there is no right answer, people try things and it works for them, and most don't do scientific studies and comparisons. Yes, if you do stupid things (stick your foot in the beer, stir your beer with a spoon that your dog licked, etc.) you will likely ruin your beer. But, for the most part, nearly all of your batches will produce drinkable beer. The guidelines that we give you are to help you have a higher success rate and have higher quality beer. My first batches weren't so good. I fermented too hot. Now the beer I make gets rave reviews, most noticeable by the amount that people consume. I figured out what works for me and that's what I do. But I started with the 3-4 rule, and found the right temperature area of my house, and the rest is history (read the upcoming book "Rickbeer, A Brewing Success Story" available on Amazon for $954.00.). I ferment for 18 days at 64 degrees, except when I ferment for 17 days or 19 days. I bottle for at least 4 weeks, but with my enormous pipeline I usually have no need to try one at 4 weeks. I hope this helps someone, maybe two of you. So brew on, follow our guidelines (or walk the plank), and build your pipeline. Oh, and remember that you can Google most anything (not that, that's really sick) and you'll find lots of answers, some of them right.
  22. 1 point
    A world without human error would be a boring place to live. I doubt beer would have even been invented without some schlub goofing something up all those millenia ago.
  23. 1 point
    Great post rick! This should be printed in the instructions and theu should make a new dvd with you giving that speech lol
  24. 1 point
    Mr B. Ricks post should be stickied and posted on "advice for new brewers". Maybe you could publish his work here and include it in your kits. I am going to print it out, frame it, and hang it above my LBK.
  25. 1 point
    Foothiller

    Are you a new brewer? Then read this.

    A couple of other good points from Rick's post: You will learn the most, fastest, by trying a basic recipe straight first, then making incremental changes. If you change multiple things (ingredients, procedures, etc.) all at once, you won't know what doesn't give you the expected results. For me, some of my 41 LBK batches have been refinements on previous recipes, and many of my 33 1-gallon batches have been to try ingredients, compare ingredients (like several that used a simple recipe and varied just the type of yeast), and test recipes before committing to a larger batch. Another interesting learning experience is to bottle in 12-oz bottles, and try one per week to see how the beer conditions during the 4 weeks after fermenting. That's harder to do during fermentation, but with a refractometer, you only use a small sample to monitor the progress. As your palate gets refined, you can start to taste the cidery acetaldehyde and the buttery diacetyl, and taste how they disappear later in the 3-week fermentation even when your OG drops within days. These are initial yeast byproducts that you don't want in your final beer.
×