Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

RickBeer

Community Members
  • Content count

    9,284
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    228

RickBeer last won the day on March 19

RickBeer had the most liked content!

About RickBeer

  • Rank
    Brewing Guru

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ann Arbor, Michigan (GO BLUE!)
  • Interests
    Brewing 5 gallon extract recipes, skiing, my family, U of Michigan.

    I enjoy answering questions on forums and paying it forward. Please ask on the forum - not in PMs.

    Also, I don't accept Friend requests, they really serve no purpose on the forum. If you participate on the forum, consider yourself a friend :).

Recent Profile Visitors

9,241 profile views
  1. RickBeer

    Hydrometer reads

    I made the assumption that he was either correcting for temperature or using a calculator that input temperature and adjusted in the ABV calc. However, people need to make sure they understand how small the adjustment is. If I take an OG reading of 1.050 at 70 degrees, the adjustment for a 60 degree calibrated hydrometer is a new reading of 1.051. If I adjust my final gravity of 1.012 at 65, the adjustment takes it to... 1.012. So let's compare unadjusted vs. adjusted: Unadjusted - (1.050 - 1.012) x 131.25 = 5% ABV Adjusted - (1.051 - 1.012) x 131.25 = 5.1% ABV In short, the ability of a homebrewer to accurate read a hydrometer has a higher degree of error than the adjustment for temperature...
  2. RickBeer

    Hydrometer reads

    The first one. But the numbers would 1.1% different, i.e. nothing.
  3. RickBeer

    Mold on LBK rim

    Possible, depends on how moist your environment is. During fermentation, there is a lot of water vapor coming out the vents on the threads, and if you are in right environment that could mold. Cleaning tip - after bottling your beer (or after putting the contents in your batch prime container), use warm water to get the yeast out. Then, fill it with warm water with a few drops of unscented dish soap, all the way up to the top, and let it soak. Then take a sponge and wipe the inside, especially the krausen line. Then wash carefully. If you have gunk on the outside, fill sink or tub with warm soapy water, and fill LBK, then put it under the soap water level. Let it soak. NEVER use a scouring pad, even the "gentle" ones, on the inside of your LBK. Once you scratch it, you might as well toss it. Never use very hot water, it can ruin the LBK, not only can it deform the LBK, but it will "bake in" the flavors. To ensure your next batch of beer is as good as the first, you need to clean your equipment immediately after use with soap and water. While rinsing is good, only soap and water will result in clean equipment for your next brew. The best cleaner to use on your brewing equipment is Oxygen Brewery Wash, available at www.mrbeer.com. Oxygen Brewery Wash effectively breaks down residue without leaving any flavor or foam-damaging residues after rinsing. If you do not have Oxygen Brewery Wash, liquid soap works fine, as long as it is unscented and is thoroughly rinsed off with warm water 105-115°F or 41-46°C. Scented soap or improper rinsing can leave a film on your equipment that ruins beer foam and leaves off flavors in your next beer. 1. Immediately after use, remove and disassemble the spigot assembly from the keg, then thoroughly wash all parts in warm water using a clean, soft cloth and clear unscented liquid soap. 2. Do not use scouring pads, wire brushes, sponges or abrasives during cleaning as they can harbor bacteria and create small scratches that may infect your beer. 3. Always clean all equipment immediately after use. I batch prime, so when my bottling slimline is full, I wash the yeast out of my LBK, then fill it and soak it while I bottle. After bottling I usually take a 1/2 hour break, then come back to wash everything. I've never had residue not easily wipe off. The key is not to let anything dry. Dry wort is like concrete.
  4. RickBeer

    Mold on LBK rim

    Yes. Sure it wasn't just residue from an overflow?
  5. RickBeer

    Induction cooktop

    Height is an issue for me also. The burner grate enamel has come off on parts of them, and can't be replaced as they are obsolete, but SWMBO doesn't yet want a new stove for the ridiculous cost that they are.
  6. RickBeer

    Induction cooktop

    I find with my gas stove that the amount of liquid in the pot is the issue. Haven't tested the limits, but 3.5 gallons of wort takes 45 minutes to come to a boil, and my boil isn't very vigorous. And that is straddling two burners, with maybe 60% of the flame of each on the pot. If a pot was wider and really straddle 2 burners, it would perhaps do better. Or if the GE Profile cooktop put out more BTUs, have no idea how many it does put out. My brief research on induction burners last Spring showed that you need 220 volts for decent power, and most people don't have a 20 volt plug anywhere but a laundry room (we have a gas dryer and no 220 plug).
  7. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    I sanitize the packet of dry yeast (if it's waterproof as many are). I then put it on a sanitized plate that has dried. I then open it with dry sanitized scissors, and pour 1/2 of the contents onto a coffee filter on my scale (that's how you know it's half...). I then fold the top several times with my sanitized hands, and place a piece of scotch tape to hold it closed. I then place the yeast in a ziplock that I wiped out with a sanitized paper towel and let dry. I would not throw an opened yeast packet in the frig, clipped shut or not, and then simply use it.
  8. RickBeer

    Cold crashing and bottle carbonating

    There is no impact, see link in my sig. I cold crash EVERY batch.
  9. RickBeer

    Cold crashing and bottle carbonating

    4 weeks is better than 3
  10. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    For what purpose?
  11. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    Android...
  12. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    No problem. Big difference between "saving yeast" (which to most means harvesting yeast from a just completed fermentation) and pitching half a pouch as he asked about. I shouldn't have used the word "save" because it's confusing.
  13. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    Sure. Dry yeast you can sanitize package, cut with sanitized scissors, use 1/2, fold and refrigerate for a short period in a sanitized ziplock, and you might be fine (not that a new brewer should try this). The number of cells in a dry yeast package (11, 11.5 grams) is more than needed for a 5 gallon batch. It is easy to pour the contents onto a sanitary surface on a scale (coffee filter) and measure out half. This would only be for a packet designed for 5 gallons, used in a 2 or 2.5 gallon batch. Liquid yeast pouches need to be shaken and kneaded to make it homogeneous, then sanitized, then poured into the wort. Measuring out half of the contents, assuming they are mixed correctly for an equal distribution of cells (unless you have a microscope), then saving half in a sanitary environment, is not advised. Harvesting the yeast cake can of course be done, but not by a novice brewer. And that's not using half the packet. That's why I said a half pouch of liquid yeast should not be saved.
  14. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    You cannot save liquid yeast...
  15. RickBeer

    Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

    I've never used anything but dry yeast in my beers. I suggest you read the descriptions on Imperial's website: https://www.imperialyeast.com/organic-yeast-strains/ A04 Barbarian Ready to attack your IPA, Barbarian produces stone fruit esters that work great when paired with citrus hops. Barbarian will give you what you need for an exceptionally balanced IPA. Temp: 62-70F, 16-21C // Flocculation: Medium // Attenuation: 73-74% A38 Juice Juicy. Fruity. Juice is an amazing strain for East Coast IPAs. The ester profile of Juice brings out the aromas and flavors of the new school hops and creates a beer that is greater than the sum of its parts. Keep an eye on this strain, it likes to move to the top of fermentation and will climb out the fermenter if too full. Temp: 64-74F, 18-23C // Flocculation: Medium // Attenuation: 72-76%
×