Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

RickBeer

Community Members
  • Content count

    9,415
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    231

Everything posted by RickBeer

  1. RickBeer

    Peanut Butter Stout

    Yeah, yeah, yeah... You're doing it wrong. Fixed...
  2. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    Unfortunately, your beer may be ruined. To ensure it's safe, please mail it to my testing facility and I will personally check every bottle. RickBeer 123 I Will Drink Your Beer Drive Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Boiling wort. Ice cube falls in. Melts, kills anything before wort cools. All is well.
  3. RickBeer

    Peanut Butter Stout

    Yes, but that's not the point 😉 ml in this case is more meaningful than teaspoons.
  4. RickBeer

    Temp & Fermentation

    Yup. Refractometer can be used before alcohol is created. After it's created, it's not accurate - but there are sites on how to adjust it. Big, huge breweries that have very expensive refractometers also use a cheap hydrometer.
  5. RickBeer

    Temp & Fermentation

    You have a cold house 😁 The most advanced breweries use hydrometers. Buy 2. One will break and then the second will try to commit suicide. A hydrometer is like $4.99.
  6. RickBeer

    Temp & Fermentation

    If you can, tape the probe for the gauge to the side of the LBK, below the fluid line, with a cloth folded over the tip to shield it from room air. It will yield a very accurate temperature. Yes, 55 would be very cold.
  7. RickBeer

    Temp & Fermentation

    As I was typing my response (early in the AM while drinking my coffee), I didn't notice (and should have) that the Fermentis data sheet has been changed. Your numbers off the packet are indeed correct. I started looking into it, and discovered they changed their datasheets some years ago (12/2016), but of course mine and many of the brewing stores are still the old ones. Stupid to change the datasheet and not change the packet at the same time. I found a post where someone claimed to have asked Fermentis, and got this answer: Thank you for contacting Fermentis. I understand the confusion. We did change the temperature range due to a few factors. We have been aware that US-05 ferments better at the elevated temperatures for some time. We wanted to change that, so that people aren’t trying to make pseudo-lagers and struggling with VDK assimilation (Diacetyl). The reason that we implemented the change was due to us going through a bit of a rebranding (changing the “Safbrew” strains to “Safale” since they are all ale yeast). There was no change in strain but rather that we know you will have success at the elevated temperatures. So if you go too cold, you in fact will want to raise it up to the higher 60s for a few days. I use it at 65. I'm going to modify my initial response.
  8. RickBeer

    Temp & Fermentation

    First, let's establish the proper temperature range for S-05. Per Fermentis, the ideal range is 64-82 degrees. However, this is due to a change in their datasheet (apparently made in 2016 but lagged the change on their website), which was never changed on the package. If you take a look at my later post in this thread, I refer to that and post a comment they made regarding that. So, the air temperature in your basement is too cold for ideal fermentation. With air temp 59-61, when the yeast gets active the temp will increase, and likely be fine. However, when the fermentation slows, the temp will drop below the ideal range. Ideally, you'd want to know the temperature of the wort in the LBK, not of the air in the room. If the temp drops too much, you may experience some Diacetyl, and will want to raise the temp as you suggest to the upper 60s at the end of fermentation. Let's go one step further. Your basement air temp, measured ______, is 59-61. If that's on a wall thermostat, that means the temp near the floor is cooler, as cold air sinks. Further, if the LBKs are sitting on a cement floor, that's basically a giant cold block. So that would make things worse. Ideally, you'd want to warm the temp some, or put the LBKs up off the floor. As to your question about raising them to room temp a few days before cold crashing, no, you don't need to do that. But, you do need to make sure that your beer thoroughly ferments, and if it's at 59 for a lot of that 3 weeks it may not. I would not be brewing at those temps without using a hydrometer to check final gravity either.
  9. RickBeer

    Peanut Butter Stout

    1 dram for 5 gallons. A dram = 1/8th of a fluid ounce = 0.75 teaspoons There are 53.3 12 ounce bottles in a 5 gallon batch. 0.75/53.3 = 0.014 teaspoons. So, yes, it's not much. Let's try in milliliters. A dram = 3.7 ml 3.7/53.3 = 0.69 ml per bottle A drop from a standard eyedropper dispenses 0.5 ml per drop. So it's more than 1 drop, and less than 2. Note the LorAnn sells droppers that fit their dram bottles. HOWEVER, do not store the dropper in the bottle for any length of time, because over time the vapors will degrade the rubber stopper.
  10. RickBeer

    Peanut Butter Stout

    No. You add it to your bottling bucket. If you don't batch prime, then you want to add no more than 2 drops (with an eyedropper that they sell) to each bottle before bottling. 1 might be fine. If you add it to the hot wort, you'll kill the flavor. If you put in the fermenter for 3 weeks, you'll lose the flavor.
  11. RickBeer

    Leaking Spigot

    Also make sure that the washer is properly installed (next time). Flat side goes towards the spigot, rounded side goes toward the LBK. Then HAND TIGHTEN ONLY, about 1/4 turn past tight. Then, as recommended prior, fill with water (I put in the same level as my beer will be to match the pressure), and let sit for 1/2 hour. Sometimes it has to be retightened.
  12. RickBeer

    Peanut Butter Stout

    Sure. Buy a bottle of LorAnn Peanut Butter flavor (1 dram size), add 1/2 of it to a Mr. Beer batch. But the Irish Stout isn't a great base for a peanut butter stout, it's better on an oatmeal stout base. Should be creamy mouth feel.
  13. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    They still use whole hops to my understanding, and the Torpedo line of beers is definitely with whole hops. https://www.sierranevada.com/faq/beer/what-are-the-ingredients-used-in-sierra-nevada-beers
  14. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    Whole grains can't brew beer. They must be crushed in some manner. Milling crushes the grain, a properly set mill will crack open the grain kernel and expose the endosperm, i.e. the inside. That's critical to mashing. The object of milling is not to make flour, and not to destroy the outer husk of the grain. Why? Because the mash is recirculated, i.e. the cloudy wort with bits of crap in it is sprayed into the top of the mash tun and is filtered by the grain bed. In addition, when a mash is sparged (water run through it), the water needs to be filtered by the grain to get let the good stuff through, and keep the crap behind (a non-scientific explanation). If it's milled too fine, then water won't find a path through the grain (think of ants in an ant hill making tunnels), and the sparge can get "stuck" or clogged. One way to prevent a stuck sparge is to use rice hulls. Some methods of brewing can use highly milled, even pulverized grain, such as BIAB (Brew In A Bag). Why? Two reasons. First, the grain is in a bag (for example a 5 gallon paint bag), and that bag filters the mash just fine). Second, a sparge in a mash tun is not the same as a sparge with BIAB. In a mash tun, you don't want the grain bed to collapse, so you start sparging before all the wort drains out. With BIAB, you lift the bag up and sparge it while it's sitting in a big strainer or collander. Hope this helps, tried to keep out the jargon.
  15. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    There would be no reason to use leaf hops ever. Beyond Sierra Nevada, most commercial brewers never use leaf hops. There is a big list of reasons to not use whole hops - they absorb a lot more wort, you need much more than pellet hops, they are less-consistent than pellet hops, ... If you do some Googling around comparing leaf vs. pellet hops, you can find a lot more reasons to not use leaf hops. A reason to use them would be if you grow your own hops, which some have tried. Several issues - hops are poisonous to dogs, creatures may eat your hops, and you need much more than with pellet hops.
  16. RickBeer

    Miller Lite

    Go to a horse barn. Hold a bucket under a horse and wait for them to fill it with piss... Then add water for Miller "Lite". True fact - Bud Light is regular Bud with water added. As has been stated, you're not going to clone a commercial beer with a Mr. Beer recipe. For Miller (or Bud), in addition to the responses posted, both are brewed with adjuncts (corn, rice) in addition to barley. These adjuncts allows the beer to be lighter than a beer brewed from malted grain. Bud uses rice, Miller uses corn. Miller also uses a proprietary hop compound. Corn and rice were used in brewing early in this country's founding because they were cheaper than using barley, and the barley grown in the US was very different than the barley that European immigrants were used to in their countries. Corn and rice are generally cheaper than using equivalent amounts of barley, partly because they don't have to be malted. If you're a Miller or Bud drinker, i.e. you like them and want to brew them, then being a homebrewer is probably not for you. While it does take great skill to brew these "beers" consistently from facility to facility, they don't compare in taste, flavor, or aroma to a well-made craft beer, or a homebrewed beer. https://www.thespruceeats.com/why-do-some-brewers-use-rice-or-corn-in-their-beer-353284 If you appreciate the quality of craft beer, you should consider WHO you give your money to. AB InBev is a company that is determined to take all the possible shelf space and drive the craft brewers out of business. They've been buying up craft brewers, and the average consumer has no idea that these breweries are not owned by a family or small company. In addition, they've been buying up homebrew stores. I don't give them my money. AB InBev owns Northern Brewer and Midwest. AB InBev owns the following "craft brands" or former craft breweries (they are no longer considered craft beer due to 25%+ ownership by a non-craft brewery: Elysian (Seattle) 32% ownership of Craft Brew Alliance (Portland) - Kona Brewing Company, Redhook, Widmer Brothers, and a few others 10 Barrel Brewing Company (Bend, Oregon) Golden Road (LA) Breckenridge Brewing (Breckenridge, CO) Blue Point (Patchogue, NY) Wicked Weed (Asheville, NC) Goose Island (Chicago, IL) Karbach (Houston, TX) Four Peaks (Tempe, AZ) Devil's Backbone (Roseland, VA) Fake craft brands, always owned by the big brewers: Blue Moon Rolling Rock (bought in 1987) Shock Top Landshark George Killian's Grolsch (bought in 2007) I'm sure this list is not complete.
  17. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    I was pointing out that the recipe you found was lacking, not pointing at you for posting it. I edited my response to clarify that.
  18. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    I've eaten them just fine.
  19. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    The recipe you found is poor then, because there is a huge difference between the ends of the spectrum (see below). As BDawg62 stated, since you decided to use C60, put that in the recipe when you pass it on. I think it's great when people find recipes. However, do your homework. Look up what the stuff is, and what effect it will have. If you have a LHBS, go in and EAT the grain. That's right, pickup a few kernels and chomp on them, and see if you get the flavor that they say you will. 10 - candy-like sweetness, mild caramel 20 - same description as 10 30 - sweet, caramel, toffee 40 - same description as 30 60 - sweet, pronounced caramel 80 - pronounced caramel, slightly burnt sugar, raisiny 90 - pronounced caramel, slightly burnt sugar, raisiny, prunes 120 - pronounced caramel, burnt sugar, raisiny, prunes And of course the higher the number, the darker the color. http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Products/Caramel.htm#10L
  20. RickBeer

    Partial Mash

    "Crystal malts" is unclear to me. Crystal / Caramel malt comes in various color / sweetness, from 10L to 120L.
  21. RickBeer

    Cleaning 740 ML PET Bottles

    He means he pours the dregs of the keg into the last bottle, marks it, let's it settle, and gets a few more ounces of beer IF it doesn't blow when carbonating, and if he pours carefully.
  22. RickBeer

    Getting back into this!

    Mr.Beer's guidance is that two years from the date on the can is ok. 3 1/2 wouldn't be good. Malliard reaction has turned it much darker, sweeter, and the final product will be crap. Toss it.
  23. RickBeer

    Cleaning 740 ML PET Bottles

    Buy Heineken in bottles, and in cans. Compare them side by side. Beer in green or clear bottles gets light struck / skunked very quickly. Pour a glass of beer, with a small amount in another glass. Put the small amount in direct sunlight for 1 minute. Smell and compare them. Some beers (Miller) use a special form of hop extract to avoid this problem.
  24. RickBeer

    Sugar for carbonating different sized bottles

    It's twice what most consider proper carbonation, and 33% more than what Mr. Beer suggests. That should tell you something.
×