MRB Josh R

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MRB Josh R last won the day on May 18

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About MRB Josh R

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    Mr.Beer Team
  • Birthday 10/14/1977

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    Male
  • Location
    Tucson, AZ
  • Interests
    Brewing, bowling, camping, hiking, hunting, video games, winemaking, fermenting anything I can get my hands on. I also race BMX bikes.

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  1. The Munich should have enough diastatic power to convert the flaked grains. It has 70 degrees Lintner (the measurement of enzymes) and regular 2-row has 110 L. I would do your partial mash for 45 mins instead of 30 just to be sure you get a full conversion.
  2. This isn't weird at all. I've brewed with flowers including rose and lavender. The trick is to use alcohol, like vodka or Everclear, not sanitized water (sanitizing food products with brewery sanitizer isn't a good practice). Alcohol will not only sanitize the flowers/fruit, but will also extract the flavors and infuse it into the beer better.
  3. You can go 4 weeks if you're brewing a lager, though it's not really necessary. But then you'd be brewing at 45-55, not 61-64. Ale yeasts will always brew for no more than 3 weeks or you can risk autolyzation of the yeast, which can cause off-flavors. Lagers don't experience this problem as much. Instead, it's diacetyl you have to worry about for those. So the last few days of fermentation are typically brought to room temps to allow diacetyl reduction (a diacetyl rest).
  4. 61-64 will work fine, though it is a little cool. Trying bringing it between 65-68 for best results. That's the sweet spot. You can ferment the beer at 68-72 if you want beer in 2 weeks, but "low and slow" is always the best - 3 weeks at 65-68.
  5. It sounds to me like a possible infection. If it's similar to sour dough, that would be lactobacillus. What chemical additions did you make? Were you keeping track of the mash pH?
  6. Wow, your water is very alkaline! I would use some lactic acid or some 5.2 mash stabilizer to adjust it for any of hoppy or dry beer such as IPAs and saisons. If brewing all-grain, acidulated malt works well, too, for getting a proper pH for your mash. Getting the pH to around 5.2 will give you much happier yeast.
  7. There's a reason Blichmann is more common at retailers. Because it's the best. That's what I would choose out of the list. The rest are perfectly fine burners, but Blichmann Engineering makes some of the best brewing gear around. They also have great customer service and all of their products are made in the US by brewers for brewers. Also, their burner has 4 legs instead of 3 for better stability than the others (you can also get extensions for it).
  8. Sparging really isn't that necessary with a full boil, but I do it with every batch anyway. If you choose not to sparge, use a bit more grains to compensate for the lack of efficiency. I highly recommend the Beersmith software to help you with this.
  9. Just keep it as simple as possible for now. Stick with batch sparging and upgrade as needed. Before you know it, you will be doing triple decoction step mashes with a fly sparge.
  10. Propane burners have everything you need. All you have to do is screw it into a tank and turn it on. Some burners may require a lighter to get it going, while others have a sparking element. There are 2 basic kinds of wort chillers. Immersion and counterflow. You really only need to start with an immersion chiller. Basically, you hook it up up a hose or faucet and run water through it. One end attaches to the faucet, the other end goes into a drain, or bucket, or whatever. You place the body of the chiller inside the beer. The flowing water exchanges the heat and rapidly cools the beer. It's not as fast as a counterflow chiller, though. This is a chiller with another length of copper tubing inside the larger length of tubing. Water flows through the outer layer while beer flows through the inner layer. These are more expensive, but way faster. Plate chillers are another option, but also cost a bit of cash and are really better for use in jockey boxes rather than chilling wort. Any of these chillers can be upgraded with wort pumps so you can use already chilled water (instead of room temp tap water) and simply pump it through the chillers for even faster cooling.
  11. It will work, but it's not really a great way to add smoke. The best way to add smoke is with actual smoke. Just get some wood (cherrywood, maple, apple, or beechwood are the best, just be sure whatever wood you use hasn't been treated) and use it to smoke your specialty grains (or the wood chips) for a few minutes. There are many techniques for smoking grains that can be found with an online search. It's no more difficult than soaking your wood chips in water, and it is much better than liquid smoke, which can tend to create unwanted phenolic flavors (think burnt band-aid flavors).
  12. Just made a 5 gallon SMaSH Saison (single malt, single hop) using a single-step decoction mash. I'm calling it "Smashing Lemons Saison". 10 lbs Pilsner Malt 1 oz Lemondrop @ 60 mins 1 oz Lemondrop @ 15 mins 1 oz Lemondrop @ FL 1 oz Lemondrop Dry-hop for 4 days Zest of 2 lemons soaked in Everclear (added to the dry-hop) 1 Package of GigaYeast Saison #1 (GY018) - This is a French Saison yeast - drier and cleaner tasting than Belgian Saison yeasts 1 Whirlfloc tab 1 capsule of Servomyces yeast nutrient 1.051 OG 5% ABV 30 IBUs 3.5 SRM Fermenting at 66 F to keep it clean tasting. I want to minimize the esters so they are just in the background. This should be a crisp, dry, and sessionable summer saison. I'll keep you posted on how it comes out.
  13. We do, but only using international shipping through GlobalShopex, which is a LOT more expensive, unfortunately.
  14. You can also order all of these items from us (we're an online company). Shipping is only $7.95 regardless of the order size. http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/unhopped-malt-extracts http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/brewing-yeast
  15. Yes, free beer all weekend. After all, you did pay the $275 registration fee. You'd think beer would be included. I recommend reading this: https://www.homebrewcon.org/conference/frst-time-attendee-guide/