MiniYoda

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MiniYoda last won the day on March 25

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About MiniYoda

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    Brewmaster in Training
  • Birthday 02/07/1964

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  1. legacy recipe

    UK? as in University of Kentucky?
  2. I don't think there is a need to toss the caps in sanitizer. While I sanitize the bottles, I put the caps that I will press on them on top while I shake the <CENSORED> out of the sanitizer in the bottle. That should sanitize the inside of the cap, and leave the outside of the caps fine and dry.
  3. with a stout, the longer you condition, the better. Those are "patience is a virtue" type of beer
  4. What he said. I did my first partial mash earlier this month, and I'm not looking back. The saying goes, If you can make soup, you can make Mr. Beer. If you can boil tea, you can make a partial mash. MiniYoda..........who can't cook worth a <CENSORED>
  5. From what I've seen, most (but NOT all) of the recipes here call for about 4oz of grain. Check out this link http://www.mrbeer.com/refills/recipes/partial-mash-recipes This is a link to the recipes by Mr. Beer that use grains. Might give you some ideas.
  6. I'll have to get back with you next week. The two kegs worth of what I bought are in week two of three in the fridge fermenting. You do know that this is a lager, and not an ale, right? You'll need to ferment this as close to 55 degrees as possible? I have to put mine in my fridge, and use the Digital Temperature Controller to keep the temp up so that the fermentation is at the right temp. The yeast is happy, but the rest of the stuff in the fridge (beer to drink, etc) is rather warm.
  7. Was going to do the Brown Bag Special recipe, but didn't want to do it as a Lager. I have two lbk's of lagers in the fridge right now, and I'd kinda like to have my fridge back at normal temperatures so I can enjoy *cold* beer for a while. So, I'm considering doing Brown Bag as an Ale. What would be a good ale yeast substitute for Saflager S-23?
  8. no, just hang them as planters and host a party. when the women ask "what are those things", your SWMBO can say, hanging flower pots. When the guys ask "what are those things", introduce them to home brewing.
  9. how about a flower planter? A starter for growing your own hops and barley https://www.walmart.com/ip/33358501?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227022880507&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40948734632&wl4=pla-78890586872&wl5=9014253&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=33358501&wl13=&veh=sem
  10. My numbers were in humor. Those who know can post the real answer.
  11. um......what was that "legal" limit for personal brewing at home? @RickBeer, is it something like 2,000 gallons per adult per household? @HoppySmile! how many households do you have? should I help you brew for you?
  12. Can I bribe you for some pictures?
  13. I've decided that if/when I go with two LBKs for a 5 gallon batch, I won't start with 2 gallons each and then top off another 1/2 gallon before bottling. Not a fear of contamination, but more of disturbing the trub. Unless I had a way to add 8 cups of water and diffuse the pour so that it doesn't hit the bottle of the keg really hard, I'm risking mixing up the settlement on the bottom of the keg and having "icky" stuff in the bottles. Big Sarge, unless there are ideas, I'll go with your idea and fill the LBK to 2.25 gallons (4.5 total) before pitching the yeast. When the temps got back down in late Fall, I'll consider 2.5 gallons per LBK, and hope I can keep the temp under control better in the fall/winter. Last summer, I had temp control issues, but that was in a different situation, so I'm hopefully things will be good from now on, but I'll play it on the safe side for now
  14. I'll give the 4.5 gallon idea a try. Basically make the batch like the instructions indicate, put one gallon of cold water in each LBK, split the wort evenly between the two, then fill with cold water to the #2 point, add an additional 4 cups of water, then pitch the yeast. The first batch I would do is a Scotch Ale, and as we all know, the Scotch can never be too strong.
  15. I'm starting with two kegs of wort, two gallons each. That means that each keg would come out stronger in taste than it should be. I'm thinking of adding 1/2 gallon to the keg to "dilute" the final product back down to the correct volume it should be. Thus, instead of having two 2-gallon batches, I'd have two 2.5 gallon batches, thus giving the proper 5 gallon total