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Found 10 results

  1. I get excited when I see Mr. Beer create new recipes to sell to us! Fun stuff to try! I am curious - how does Mr. Beer develop new recipes? Do these come over from Cooper's? Is there a Mr. Beer test kitchen in Arizona? And then how do you decide when to retire a recipe? Ingredient availability? A perceived flaw? Do you shoot to have X number of new recipes per year? Any thoughts to share @MRB Josh B, @MRB Josh R, @MRB Rick, @MRB Tim would be greatly appreciated!
  2. This is one of our biggest beers yet, next to our Novacaine barleywine recipe. I have a 5 gallon Cornelius keg of it aging in my cellar fridge right now. It will be bottled in December. I took a taste of it a few days ago and it already tastes incredible. I soaked my oak in Bulliet bourbon, but you can use whatever whiskey or rum you want. It is highly recommended that you age this for at LEAST 6 months. Cheers! Get yours HERE! We also have oak chips available separately: http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/special-adjuncts/american-oak-chips
  3. Introducing something a bit different, but really great on these cold winter nights, our new Hot Mulled Cider! This is a very simple cider recipe that requires NO carbonation (though it would taste nice as a carbonated spiced cider, too). It will definitely warm you up, especially if you add a shot of rum or brandy to it for an extra kick. Get yours HERE!
  4. This is one of my new favorite recipes. Inspired by amazing beers like Stone's Xocoveza and Ska Brewing's Autumnal Mole Stout, this spiced chili stout is rich and smooth. It has an English stout base, but with a Latin kick. I highly recommend using Poblano or dry Ancho chilies, but any chili or hot pepper will do. Get yours HERE!
  5. Good news! We have Lactose and Cocoa Nibs back in stock (http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/special-adjuncts)! That also means the return of Angry Bovine Chocolate Milk Stout!! Add even more chocolate character, body, and flavor by supplementing the recipe with 2 oz Chocolate Malt (http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/grains/chocolate-malt) and 2 oz Crystal 60 (http://www.mrbeer.com/ingredients/grains/crystal-malt-60). Steep at 155-170 for 30 mins.
  6. We are releasing a new Partial Mash Oktoberfest Lager just in time for the fall season. This full-bodied, malty Oktoberfest is probably the closest we have to a true german-style Marzen Oktoberfest Lager. With bready malts and just enough hop balance, I think you guys that go for the maltier beers are going to really enjoy this one. It is on sale for only $30! Cheers! http://www.mrbeer.com/hot-deals/zombie-fest-lager
  7. Our newest Brewery Collaboration beer is now available!! It is also our very first Partial Mash Recipe!!! Proceeds from all Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale recipes sold will be donated directly to Paladin Brewery's owner and Brewmaster, John Chandler. John started with a Mr. Beer kit several years ago, and recently decided to open his own brewery. However, he was diagnosed with sinus cancer right before the brewery's opening. Now, Paladin is celebrating their 6-month anniversary, and most importantly, John's health, as he is in remission. This Mr.Beer clone of Paladin's Sir Kenneth Blonde Ale is an American Blonde Ale using hops commonly found in a Bohemian Pilsner. This beer is crisp and clean with a nice, rich malt and spicy hop character. Get yours here for only $29.99: http://www.mrbeer.com/sir-kenneth-blonde-ale-collaboration
  8. In honor of the new Star Wars release, we're introducing 2 new themed beers for a limited time. Chewbeerca - Belgian IPA - Hailing from a tropical forested world in a galaxy far, far away, this Imperial Belgian-style IPA will definitely put some wooly hair on your chest. At 8.3% ABV, this high octane beer emits strong spicy notes from the Belgian yeast, and dank earthy notes from the Columbus, Centennial, and Warrior hop additions. These spicy and earthy characteristics are supported by a solid malt foundation created by our Diablo IPA and additional LME Softpacks. This beer is just as complex and exotic as the planet it hails from. Get it here: http://www.mrbeer.com/chewbeerca-belgian-ipa?utm_source=hubspot&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=E55 Millennium Falconer's Flight - Red Ale - After a long day protecting the galaxy from tyranny, what better way is there to unwind than with a robust, but easy drinking Imperial Red Ale? We’ve taken the rich, malty character of our Seasonal Imperial Red Ale and fused it with the tropical fruit notes of the famous Falconer’s Flight hop blend to create a well-balanced, but complex Imperial Red Ale that is out of this world. Get it here: http://www.mrbeer.com/millennium-falconers-flight-red-ale?utm_source=hubspot&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=E55
  9. Should've added Oats to my chocolate Porter! I'm sure it happens a lot the first few batches... Realizing after its fermenting, that you wanna try adding or tweaking one thing in the recipe... Maybe next time
  10. So, I've got three LBKs . After bottling my latest batches I cleaned them out thoroughly with cold water, an unscented hand soap, and a soft wash cloth. Today, as I was organizing my brewing equipment, I got my nose right into each of the LBKs and found that they all smelled strongly of...well...beer, of course. I doubt that there is anything that I can do to completely eliminate the residual scents of my previous batches. As I have two recipes being shipped soon (Camilla's Folly and That Voodoo) I wondered how my fellow brewers deal with the very real possibility of introducing off flavors from previous batches into their current recipes. Do any of you guys who maintain a regular pipeline brew only certain brews in specified LBKs? Does it matter? Is there any advantage to brewing similar brews in the same LBK (example porters in a LBK designated for only porters) such as a more complex flavor over time? Best, Zoot