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11 hours ago, WisconsinBadger said:

But why the three days in the fridge? Why three days? Won't it be cold in one?

 

And if I condition for 5 weeks + is it always three days in the fridge? Just trying to understand the concept. Or do I have to put all of it the fridge at 4 weeks to kill the yeast, and then I can return it to room temp?

 

(I'm currently in the new and confused stage, someday I will evolve into the wise beer master phase, someday)

 

Yes, it will be cold in one day, but 3 in the cold days allows the Co2 to "lock in" to the liquid. While your beer will be carbonated and cold, sometimes if you drink it too early, it will be flat about halfway through because most of that Co2 has gassed off. Co2 wants to leave the liquid at high temps, which is why your beer will gush if you try to open it at room temps right after carbonation has finished.

 

Of course, this isn't a "set in stone" rule. Depending on the beer, it could be fine to drink after only 12-24 hours in the fridge, but we like to stress 3 days as a general rule of thumb so your beer will at its best.

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17 hours ago, WisconsinBadger said:

But why the three days in the fridge? Why three days? Won't it be cold in one?

 

 

It's a guideline.  I'll often drink mine after only two days.  But I don't mind if my beer is a little cloudy, either, or if I get a little of the stuff from the bottom of the bottle in my glass.

But If I'm pouring for friend or family I let it go three days so the pour is nice and clean.  I can't have them whispering to each other about my cloudy homebrew as soon as I turn my back. :)

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After 25 brews with Mr. Beer, I just had my first bottle foamer.  As other people have said, it’s usually due to over-carbonation. 

So others might learn, here’s what happened.

Brewed Mr. Beer’s Baltic Porter exactly by the instructions.  Fermented for 24 days.  Checked with hydrometer and was on target.  (This was my second batch of the Baltic Porter since it was popular among my friends.)  Cold crashed for two days.

Here's the key, I believe:  I used Brewer’s Best tablets for the carbonation sugar during bottling.  I used 4 tablets in each 12 ounce bottle.  According to the Brewer’s Best instructions, that should yield “medium” carbonation.  I’ve used Brewer’s Best tablets with the Octoberfestivus recipe and the Black Moon Weizen recipe and the Amberosia recipe without any problems.  Something about the Baltic Porter resulted in over-carbonation with the Brewer’s Best tablets.  My first batch of Baltic Porter used two Mr. Beer’s carbonation drops for some 750 ml PET bottles and regular sugar (two teaspoons) for other 750 ml bottles.  (I didn't use any 12 oz. glass bottles for that batch.)  The carbonation for that batch was just perfect.

I conditioned the Baltic Porter for 87 days.  Then, placed some bottles in the fridge for 8 days.  The first two that I opened were both foamers.

Both bottles were not just drinkable, but very good tasting.  I just had to pour quickly and let it settle down before drinking.

I’m going to exclusively use plain old sugar from now on.  It works.

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i use sugar cubes. the microdots from domino yield 2 grams of sucrose per cube.  I use a priming calculator based on style guidelines.  if i'm a little under/ over I don't sweat it.

 

example,  I just bottled an ipa. style guidelines was to use approx. 2.5 grams of sugar. I used one cube. a little under...

 

I can drink under-carbed beer.. I cant drink bottles that explode in the extra shower room and end up on the floor and walls.

 

since I drink warm beer I have to open the bottles while they stand in a large salad bowel.  if they gush I can salvage the gushed beer.

 

Ive started using glass again... fingers crossed no bombs.  fg was on target.

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3 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

i use sugar cubes. the microdots from domino yield 2 grams of sucrose per cube.  I use a priming calculator based on style guidelines.  if i'm a little under/ over I don't sweat it.

 

example,  I just bottled an ipa. style guidelines was to use approx. 2.5 grams of sugar. I used one cube. a little under...

 

I can drink under-carbed beer.. I cant drink bottles that explode in the extra shower room and end up on the floor and walls.

 

since I drink warm beer I have to open the bottles while they stand in a large salad bowel.  if they gush I can salvage the gushed beer.

 

Ive started using glass again... fingers crossed no bombs.  fg was on target.

I'm just curious, Zorak.  Can conditioning at excessively warm temperatures also cause a bottle foamer?  I've had wheat beers turn into nothing but foam after 3 days in the fridge and 6 months conditioning (in reverse order, of course); 3 of those months were in the 75-85 degree range (June-August).  

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10 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I'm just curious, Zorak.  Can conditioning at excessively warm temperatures also cause a bottle foamer?  I've had wheat beers turn into nothing but foam after 3 days in the fridge and 6 months conditioning (in reverse order, of course); 3 of those months were in the 75-85 degree range (June-August).  

 

Temperature shouldn't cause this because the amount of Co2 you get is only dependent on the amount of sugar in the bottle. Yeah, it could explode at high enough temps because Co2 is a gas at that point, but once refrigerated, it goes back to its less volatile liquid state. So the temperature that the beer was conditioned shouldn't make it over-carbonated. Over-carbonation is most commonly caused by 1 of 4 things:

 

1. Incomplete fermentation. If the beer wasn't at its final gravity at bottling, it will continue fermenting in the bottle, along with the additional sugar you added.

2. Too much priming sugar.

3. Residual Co2 at bottling. This is another reason why I prefer 3 weeks fermentation to 2 weeks fermentation. During that 3rd week, excess Co2 will off-gas. Without this off-gassing, it would end up in the bottle along with the Co2 created by the added sugar. This can cause over-carbonation.

4. Contamination. Bacteria can also produce Co2 so if you get a contaminated batch, over-carbonation can happen. 

 

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I have also had this problem with Baltic porter before, and other darker stronger brews.

 

I have a Baltic Porter fermenting now - it was with  S_05 yeast - fermenting around 63-65 deg. and supposedly that yeast is happy there and 3 weeks should be enough.

I measured the BRIX at start and after 21 days. 15.6 (OG 1.064) to start and 8.8 (FG 1.017) after 21 days. Using the online calc. this works out to ABV of 5.9 so it has not done yet.

Needs to go to BRIX 8.3 (FG 1.013) for ABV of 6.5.

The behavior wrt krausen etc. seemed ok, still small bubbles on top.

I moved it into warmer room and shook it up a bit to circulate yeast.

Now there is a good area of active bubbles on the surface - not 100% covered but the middle 2/3 is covered.

 

I will let it go another week and check again.

 

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On 5/27/2015 at 5:59 AM, Nickfixit said:

re cloudiness on first and last bottles --  suggestions.

 

first bottle

-  some trub will have settled in the spigot and comes out into first bottle. I always flush the spigot by open and shut spigot quickly to get that out into a small glass so you can see cloudiness (then taste it to empty the glass), you only need flush about an oz or 2 to get it out. Keep flushing a tablespoon at a time until clearer, but no more than a couple oz.

 

last bottle

- you are getting some of the trub from the bottom of LBK. As you get to the end of bottling, you can take off the lid and look to see when the trub starts to go into the bottles and stop there. On the last bottle I do not prime until I know how full the bottle is - and this is always my early test bottle - maybe 2 weeks into conditioning to see how it is going.


I can't get over how friendly you all are. you long time Brewers know the little tricks and aren't afraid to trade your secrets just to keep good beer brewing. thanks for that advice. I'm going to do that with my 1st batch. Put it in the LBK on August 21, 2017 the day of the Eclipse. and it will be 3 weeks on September 11, hoping to bottle that day . I'm calling it my Eclipse Ale. I sure hope it turns out  as nice as the people in this community!

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5 minutes ago, Darthvin said:


I can't get over how friendly you all are. you long time Brewers know the little tricks and aren't afraid to trade your secrets just to keep good beer brewing. thanks for that advice. I'm going to do that with my 1st batch. Put it in the LBK on August 21, 2017 the day of the Eclipse. and it will be 3 weeks on September 11, hoping to bottle that day . I'm calling it my Eclipse Ale. I sure hope it turns out  as nice as the people in this community!

Great brew name!

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