RickBeer

Cold crashing - what it is, and why do you care?

132 posts in this topic

So if I'm to fully understand, the dead yeast will fall out of suspension once their job is complete and they've expended all their energy, correct? Then how is it the live yeast, that goes dormant when cold, stay in suspension ready to eat once they wake?

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Because enough yeast cells are in suspension.

I'm more interested in the science of why. Call it the paramedic in me. I'll have to search and read up on this because now I'm really interested in why.

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I was very skeptical too before I tried it thinking the yeast would fall to the bottom. All I know is I've never had a problem. Evidently, enough yeast stays in suspension.

RickBeer likes this

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Think I am going to try it this weekend. Going to cheat a little and put the lbk's in the fridge Friday (only day 20) so I can bottle Saturday. Thinking 1 day should not hurt anything.

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Mac, I'd go Thursday. I tried an overnighter and it warmed up pretty quickly when I started bottling.

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recommend angling or tilting lbk during fermentation? I didn't do that, didn't know, but did see a youtube video of a guy tilting it when bottling to help prevent trub release. do u tilt it while its in the fridge?

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Not a minute. See #2 in the post.

2) Does cold crashing impact how my beer will carbonate? - No. Yeast wake up and it carbonates fine.

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I'm ready to cold crash, but very limited on space in the fridge and not sure the wife would be OK with me getting rid of the milk and other things in the top self. Is it OK to use the big ice box that mother nature created? I'm thinking of taking the cooler outside and letting it sit on my desk for three days. Is it possible to cold crash at too low of a temp?

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well yeah, you don't want it to freeze.

 

So as long as it doesn't freeze this would be OK? I'd guess my fridge is at about 40 but outside would/could be colder, I was thinking about the yeast is the possibility of the colder temp OK for them?

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Because it's alcohol, you can actually get around 32 degrees without it freezing.  However, the point of cold crashing is really to solidify the trub and to clear up your beer.

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Most refrigerators chill at 35 - 37 degrees.  40 is too warm for some foods over time.

 

You want to refrigerate it, NOT freeze it.  And, the temp needs to stay consistent, like a refrigerator would.  So putting it outside in winter temps, or when it's below freezing at night, would NOT be a good idea.  Putting it outside where the temp varies up and down by more than a few degrees would not be a good idea - you don't want it seesawing from 35 at night to 48 in the daytime.  

 

Lastly - remember critters - whether bugs or animals. 

 

You should talk to your wife about what's important more in life - milk or cold crashing beer.   :)

 

And since this is your first batch, perhaps cold crashing isn't top of your list...

D Kristof and Vakko like this

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