RickBeer

Cold crashing - what it is, and why do you care?

148 posts in this topic

Going back to this that I think did not totally get answered.

The cold crashing will get more of the suspended matter, live/dead yeast cells and other stuff to fall to the bottom.

Some yeast cells remain in suspension even if you can't see them.

They are enough to eat the priming sugar and carbonate the beer in the bottle.

The main difference is if clearer when bottled it will take longer to carbonate (less yeast) but be clearer beer. (Think competitions) .

Otherwise - more yeast - quicker carbonating, maybe a little cloudy but you effectively cold crash it in the bottle when refrigerating anyway, too much - it will taste yeasty but give you good nutritional side effects. :-D.

 

 

Links to a couple of answers.

 

 

http://www.quora.com/After-fermentation-of-beer-what-happens-to-yeast

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/how-many-yeast-cells-beer-433074/

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Yeah - I'm going to differ on that last point.  Cold crashing does NOT affect carbonation time.  I've had bottles firm in days, and always ready to go at 4 weeks.

 

In the original post both points were covered, and carbonation time was again discussed here.  

D Kristof likes this

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80% of my beer are lagers so I don't cold crash them.  I do cold crash all of ales and any real fruit recipes get transferred to a secondary and then cold crashed.

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So as long as it doesn't freeze this would be OK? I'd guess my fridge is at about 40 but outside would/could be colder, I was thinking about the yeast is the possibility of the colder temp OK for them?

40 is cold enough to do the job with ale yeast.

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So I threw my LBK in the fridge (34F) and I'm going to batch prime Sunday night. Being that the beer is at a lower temp how much table sugar should I use? Should I worry about the beer warming up to fast?

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I thought temperature had no bearing the volume of sugar.

The volume of sugar should be determined by the required volume of CO2 that you're trying to hit.

Temperature should only effect the rate at which the CO2 is produced and absorbed.

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So I threw my LBK in the fridge (34F) and I'm going to batch prime Sunday night. Being that the beer is at a lower temp how much table sugar should I use? Should I worry about the beer warming up to fast?

 

Hopefully you didn't throw it, since the goal is to settle the beer...   :lol:

 

If you haven't already, prop up the end with the nozzle with about 1/2" of something - DVD/CD cases, two bathroom tiles, a piece of wood.  The trub will flow away from the nozzle and solidify there, and you will get even more out.

 

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morriganpoe likes this

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Ok, I was using NB.com calculator and was entering 34F on the temp. So I should enter 68F since that is the highest temp it has reached correct?

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I thought temperature had no bearing the volume of sugar.

The volume of sugar should be determined by the required volume of CO2 that you're trying to hit.

Temperature should only effect the rate at which the CO2 is produced and absorbed.

This is true. Temps have no bearing on the volume of sugar for carbonation, only the rate it is converted to Co2. 

D Kristof likes this

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I thought temperature had no bearing the volume of sugar.

The volume of sugar should be determined by the required volume of CO2 that you're trying to hit.

Temperature should only effect the rate at which the CO2 is produced and absorbed.

 

"Upon completion of fermentation, a certain amount of CO2 remains in the beer. This amount of "residual CO2" depends upon the temperature of the fermentation."

 

That's why you put in the highest temp that the beer achieved during fermentation into the calculators.  The warmer the beer got, the more CO2 escaped, which means the more sugar you need now.  The colder the beer was, the less sugar you need.  

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Hopefully you didn't throw it, since the goal is to settle the beer...   :lol:

 

If you haven't already, prop up the end with the nozzle with about 1/2" of something - DVD/CD cases, two bathroom tiles, a piece of wood.  The trub will flow away from the nozzle and solidify there, and you will get even more out.

 

attachicon.gif20150219_101934.jpg

Well, I was going to use a racking cane. I placed it at the very edge so I don't have to move it at all except removing the lid of course.

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"Upon completion of fermentation, a certain amount of CO2 remains in the beer. This amount of "residual CO2" depends upon the temperature of the fermentation."

 

That's why you put in the highest temp that the beer achieved during fermentation into the calculators.  The warmer the beer got, the more CO2 escaped, which means the more sugar you need now.  The colder the beer was, the less sugar you need.  

Oh, you're referring to residual Co2 from the fermentation. In that case, yes, you're correct. If you really want to reach an exact amount of carbonation, this is an important step, otherwise, it shouldn't be anything to worry about.

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Ok, I was using NB.com calculator and was entering 34F on the temp. So I should enter 68F since that is the highest temp it has reached correct?

 

Yes.  Otherwise you will have very flat beer.

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Seems difficult to measure if you're not standing there during fermentation.  While a stick on will tell you the LBK temp, it doesn't tell you the highest achieved temp.

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I didn't create the calculators, nor the science...   ^_^

 

Since I use my freezer, and it's set on 64, with a max of 65, I put in 64.  If you play with the calculators, a degree or two doesn't make a huge difference.  A bunch of degrees does though.

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Seems difficult to measure if you're not standing there during fermentation.  While a stick on will tell you the LBK temp, it doesn't tell you the highest achieved temp.

Ya, I tried to change the ice packs every 24 hours to keep it at 64ish but there was a day or two I got home late from work and it reached 68. Oh the long hours of a UPS driver.

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Ya, I tried to change the ice packs every 24 hours to keep it at 64ish but there was a day or two I got home late from work and it reached 68. Oh the long hours of a UPS driver.

Yah that seems like crazy hours.  I've seen that my box was out for delivery at 7am and the guy doesn't show up to my house until 8pm.

 

 

I didn't create the calculators, nor the science...   ^_^

 

Since I use my freezer, and it's set on 64, with a max of 65, I put in 64.  If you play with the calculators, a degree or two doesn't make a huge difference.  A bunch of degrees does though.

Could be 5plus degree hike during HK... that's why I bring it up.

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Could be 5plus degree hike during HK... that's why I bring it up.

Not with the probe taped to the LBK. Temp goes up, freezer kicks on. Never gets over 18.3C (64.94 F).

Jim Johnson likes this

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Not with the probe taped to the LBK. Temp goes up, freezer kicks on. Never gets over 18.3C (64.94 F).

That's how I run my chamber with the probe taped to the active fermenter below the wort line

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Yah that seems like crazy hours.  I've seen that my box was out for delivery at 7am and the guy doesn't show up to my house until 8pm.

 

 

Could be 5plus degree hike during HK... that's why I bring it up.

Drivers don't start until 9-9:30am. If it says anything before that it just means the package was scanned and loaded in the truck. If it's getting there that late then it's probably because of all the weather delays we've been having. Some day's we get half the volume we usually get and  then the late trailers get here and we stay out till 10pm cause we're over loaded. I know Dallas Texas has had a 2 day delay most of last week. Or you ticked off your UPS driver before and he saves your address for last LOL.

BeerBro likes this

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Not with the probe taped to the LBK. Temp goes up, freezer kicks on. Never gets over 18.3C (64.94 F).

How does that work if you're using multiple LBKs?

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If they start at the same time, since same yeast, same temp.

If different times, I move probe to most active and put others higher in freezer.  Since heat rises, if I'm cooling the freezer to keep the lower ones at 64, then it keeps the upper ones around 64 or so anyway.  I do check the temp strips regularly and nothing has ever gotten above 64.

Jim Johnson and Vakko like this

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