RickBeer

Cold crashing - what it is, and why do you care?

176 posts in this topic

How much propping does LBK need (1/2"', 1"', .??)? I assume not too much if you want to get as much beer as possible out. Sorry if it's already been posted.

It's a case of anything's better than nothing. Like RickBeer said about 2 CD/DVD cases

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My wife sells granite tops as part of her job and when a type of top is no longer carried she brings home the "sample squares". They are just right to use as coasters...and stacked, 2 work for my LBKs

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I read this whole thread and have a stupid question - don't throw stuff at me.

I started cold crashing my Novacaine this morning. I am using a standup freezer with a temp controller. I have the probe taped to the side of the LBK below the wort line with isulation over it. 10 minutes ago, I had the temp controller set at 66. I just set it to 36 for cold crash.

Am I in danger of freezing my wort?

I ask this because because When my wort hits 36 the freezer will turn off. But the air temp and freezer walls in the chamber will be way below 32 degrees. I fear my wort will continue to drop in temperature until it stabilizes. Should I stabilize every 10 degrees or so?

Thanks!

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I read this whole thread and have a stupid question - don't throw stuff at me.

I started cold crashing my Novacaine this morning. I am using a standup freezer with a temp controller. I have the probe taped to the side of the LBK below the wort line with isulation over it. 10 minutes ago, I had the temp controller set at 66. I just set it to 36 for cold crash.

Am I in danger of freezing my wort?

I ask this because because When my wort hits 36 the freezer will turn off. But the air temp and freezer walls in the chamber will be way below 32 degrees. I fear my wort will continue to drop in temperature until it stabilizes. Should I stabilize every 10 degrees or so?

Thanks!

no, the freezing point for your brew is probably around 27f

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Pulled my bottom LBK out of my freezer on Saturday... 30lbs of frozen beer lol.  I think I need to change my probe location.

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Well, sort of.  The amount of sugar is determined by the warmest temperature that the beer achieved during fermentation, NOT the temperature that it is at when you bottle.

 

Screwy's site.  

I have been reading and rereading posts this morning and this topic got me to thinking of carbonating the Strawberry Basil Wheat. Since I am using the weissbier extract, I went to Screwy Brewer to see how much sugar to use for priming. Based on the sites chart, a German Weissbier would have a CO2 Vol of 4.0 (midrange) which would equate to 24.5 tsp of sugar to carb! The most I have ever used was 12 for one of my recent batches, but that seems like a Huge amount of sugar for a 2.13 gallon batch. The American Wheat at 2.5 CO2 would equal almost 13 tsp. I would be using the American Wheat value and assume it should have good carbonation. Any suggestions or comments?

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I carbonate beer to the level that I like to drink it at.  I don't care about styles.  The most sugar that I have ever put in is 65 grams for a 2.13 gallon LBK, now my standard is 65 grams for 2.5 gallon LBK batch.  For my 2 wheats (Fruit and Blue Moon) I do 65 and 60 respectively.  65 is around 14.5 teaspoons.  14.5 for 2.5 gallons = 12.5 for a 2.13 gallon batch.

 

I find the "german" beers like Heineken and Beck's too carbonated.  

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I carbonate beer to the level that I like to drink it at.  I don't care about styles.  The most sugar that I have ever put in is 65 grams for a 2.13 gallon LBK, now my standard is 65 grams for 2.5 gallon LBK batch.  For my 2 wheats (Fruit and Blue Moon) I do 65 and 60 respectively.  65 is around 14.5 teaspoons.  14.5 for 2.5 gallons = 12.5 for a 2.13 gallon batch.

 

I find the "german" beers like Heineken and Beck's too carbonated.

Thank you!

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Also, bottle-conditioning & carbonating a beer to 4 volumes of CO² might be dangerous. I seem to remember seeing some "unwritten rule" about not going over 3.0-3.2 volumes when carbing by priming in the bottle, but I am not 100% sure this is true.

 

  :unsure:

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I have been reading and rereading posts this morning and this topic got me to thinking of carbonating the Strawberry Basil Wheat. Since I am using the weissbier extract, I went to Screwy Brewer to see how much sugar to use for priming. Based on the sites chart, a German Weissbier would have a CO2 Vol of 4.0 (midrange) which would equate to 24.5 tsp of sugar to carb! The most I have ever used was 12 for one of my recent batches, but that seems like a Huge amount of sugar for a 2.13 gallon batch. The American Wheat at 2.5 CO2 would equal almost 13 tsp. I would be using the American Wheat value and assume it should have good carbonation. Any suggestions or comments?

 

i did 4.0 CO2 volume on the raspberry wheat I did... way too much... way too much...  use that much, and you will bottle bomb if you get over 85F...  plus, it is just way too fizzy at that level... stick with 2.5 to 3.0 for these.  I used the same chart, and saw that 4.0 was the mid range for Weissbier, but it is just not a good idea...  my belgian blanc i did at 2.5 and plan to do the same for the strawberry basil fermenting now...

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On 2/26/2015 at 10:25 AM, brybry said:

 

So as long as it doesn't freeze this would be OK? I'd guess my fridge is at about 40 but outside would/could be colder, I was thinking about the yeast is the possibility of the colder temp OK for them?

I know this is old.  But a thought I may try.  Instead of the cold crash, set the keg on a block of ice for a few hours before bottling.  I wonder if the cold shock on the trub would suck the remaining particles out?  Or maybe just firm up the trub so that it does not get into the last bottle?  I've never had a clarity problem, but I do have a plastic container that freezing 5-6 inches of water in it would make a nice block to sit the trub on.  A thought, anyway, especially when there's no room in the fridge.

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my definition of the true cold crashing, is when ur wife/girlfriend kicks u out of the house when u had a few too many and u pass out outside at the front door...............but of course in my case I always wake up in the bushes

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7 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

my definition of the true cold crashing, is when ur wife/girlfriend kicks u out of the house when u had a few too many and u pass out outside at the front door...............but of course in my case I always wake up in the bushes

Or when she's so damn frigid the next day, your tongue sticks to her neck when you kiss her.

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2 minutes ago, HoppySmile! said:

my definition of the true cold crashing, is when ur wife/girlfriend kicks u out of the house when u had a few too many and u pass out outside at the front door...............but of course in my case I always wake up in the bushes

And here I always thought this only happens to me, waking up in bushes that is!!!! hahahahaha

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40 minutes ago, Bopper09 said:

I know this is old.  But a thought I may try.  Instead of the cold crash, set the keg on a block of ice for a few hours before bottling.  I wonder if the cold shock on the trub would suck the remaining particles out?  Or maybe just firm up the trub so that it does not get into the last bottle?  I've never had a clarity problem, but I do have a plastic container that freezing 5-6 inches of water in it would make a nice block to sit the trub on.  A thought, anyway, especially when there's no room in the fridge.

 

That likely will have little impact.  Cold crashing in the frig for a day doesn't solidify things much either, that's why I say 3 days.

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On ‎2016‎-‎10‎-‎07 at 8:55 AM, RickBeer said:

 

That likely will have little impact.  Cold crashing in the frig for a day doesn't solidify things much either, that's why I say 3 days.

I was thinking if no room in the fridge, or a frigid wife.  Or soon on the cement driveway at -20 for an hour may help as well.  A thought anyway.

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On ‎8‎/‎12‎/‎2015 at 0:04 PM, RickBeer said:

I find the "german" beers like Heineken and Beck's too carbonated.  

I figure if you cannot pout it into the glass without waiting 5 min for foam to subside on a partial fill, then it is too carbonated. Other than that, it is taste.

But I do get them with that half glass full of foam problem, Even with only 3 sugar dots per 750ml. (~ 1.5 tsp). 

And NO I do not pour the beer out from 3 feet above the glass - lol.

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