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Cold crashing - what it is, and why do you care?

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I'm fermenting a batch of American ale right now. Bottling day is this coming weekend (3 week mark) Should I cold crash for a few days prior? Does it matter what type of brew you're making?

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I guess I don't have anything to lose. Except sediment that is. I've only bottled one batch ever and have to admit I left some beer behind in the LBK bc I didn't want to catch sediment. This may be the solution. 

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You're most likely to get trub in the last bottle rather than in all of them. You might try racking into a racking bucket and batch carbonating. It helps get rid of more trub and ensures more even carbonation of your beer, and IMO, an easier way to modulate your desired CO2. 

 

Cold crashing isn't a bad idea for sure. It's just not something that Mr. Beer goes into BC they design their system to be simple. If you have a dorm or apartment fridge those are great for lagering and cold crashing. 

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1 hour ago, Jdub said:

I guess I don't have anything to lose. Except sediment that is. I've only bottled one batch ever and have to admit I left some beer behind in the LBK bc I didn't want to catch sediment. This may be the solution. 

The only reason I don't do it is because I can't fit my LBK in my fridge.

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Just now, C-Note 1959 said:

So from what I have come to understand is that the main purpose of cold crashing is to clear up your beer. So would it still benefit you when doing a porter or a stout? Just curious.

 

It also compacts your trub and reduces the amount of trub you get in your bottles.  so, yes, you get benefit no matter the style.

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1 hour ago, C-Note 1959 said:

So from what I have come to understand is that the main purpose of cold crashing is to clear up your beer. So would it still benefit you when doing a porter or a stout? Just curious.

 

Go back and re-read post #2.  First purpose is to compact trub and get more beer out of the LBK.

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If bottling day is this coming Sunday (day 21), can I get away with cold crashing starting on Friday? Or do I need to ferment exactly 21 days. This may be minutia, but.........

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35 minutes ago, Jdub said:

If bottling day is this coming Sunday (day 21), can I get away with cold crashing starting on Friday? Or do I need to ferment exactly 21 days. This may be minutia, but.........

You’re getting risky but you will be fine. You should most definitely be done fermenting but the yeast clean up stage after can not be underestimated. Its longer than two weeks, you have that going for you. 

 

As a newb you should play it safe and not take risks until your process is established and you have a few batches under your belt. 

 

(Some of us on here always bottle after two weeks, dont tell anyone. 👊🏼 @BDawg62) 😈

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14 minutes ago, youdontknowme311 said:

Does cold crashing affect the amount of sugar used when batch priming? I see some priming calculators ask for current temp, fermentation temp or highest temp. 

No, the beer will warm back up so it shouldn't effect anything. Just enter in whatever it's asking for and it should work fine.

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The reason calculators ask for the temperature is that the colder a beer is, the easier CO2 goes into the liquid.  When a commercial brewery cold crashes, the vessel can hold a certain pressure of CO2, which is then absorbed in some part into the beer.  So, at the end of cold crashing, the beer is partly carbonated.  They then put it into a brite tank and carbonate it the rest of the way.  

 

Use the warmest temp that it achieved that you know of.  If you play with a calculator, you'll see only small differences.  

 

5 gallons, 2 volumes, 68 = 0.86 volumes in the beer already, use 3.0 table sugar.  At 70, it goes to 0.83 volumes and 3.1 oz.  

 

Think of the difference of 0.1 oz of sugar in 5 gallons of beer.

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This has probably been covered but....

After a lager has fermented cold  then the 2-3 day rest at room temp, should I chill it down again with a cold crash or go straight to bottling? 

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On 1/14/2016 at 2:37 PM, MRB Josh R said:

 

No. But you don't need to know the temp of the wort. You just need to know your ambient temperature, then simply add an average of 5 degrees to that. It doesn't have to be exact, just within the yeast's optimum range. I keep my brew room at 65. This gets the wort at about 70, which is perfect for most styles.

@Cato @Marius see this thread..... there is some good discussion about wort temp and how to regulate. I just learned something by reading it. 

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I cold crashed my first batch since I only had the lbk to bottle from. As far as procedure went it worked great to compact the trub. The bottling wand worked great. Bottling again this weekend and will follow same routine.

I only cold crashed for a little over 24 hrs at 37F but have noticed some do it for 2-3 days.

 

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my Octoberfest has been cold crashing for 5 days. I am just having too many things come up that i am not getting a chance to bottle after 3 days Hopefully i can get to it tonight but is cold crashing that long going to affect it in any way?

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

No, cold crashing is not going to hurt it.  HOWEVER, sitting on the yeast cake too long will.  I would not recommend going more than 4 weeks total from beginning of fermentation, at the most 5 weeks.  

Ok what a relief thank you for answering 

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