Jamescraig317

Bottle Prime or Batch Prime

112 posts in this topic

 I am a relatively new brewer. Made a few batches before I discovered the Forums and have found a lot of useful advice but 1 thing I am not sure about is what is batch prime/ bottle prime? Is that when you put the carbonating sugar in prior/during bottling?

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Batch priming is when you transfer the wort to another container and add all the sugar. You buy a 2.5 gallon slimline or use another LBK or a bottling bucket.

What is a bottling bucket?

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But a bottling bucket doesn't need a spigot. IMO, all it is , is a bucket to which you rack (transfer) your beer off the trub and from which you bottle (could be with a siphon, tube and bottling wand or if the bucket has a spigot then simply a tube and bottling wand. The value of a bottling bucket is that a) it reduces the likelihood that you will bottle any trub (because the trub has been essentially left behind when you racked) and since the beer in the bottling bucket is essentially trub-free then you can add the priming sugar directly to the beer in the bucket, gently mix and then bottle... (I use a two gallon food grade plastic bucket from LHBS to bottle my beers and wines  - no spigot to worry about or clean )

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Keep in mind that another LBK is only ten bucks which is around the price of a slimline.  You can also ferment in the additional LBK whereas you can not in a slimline.  My preference would be to get another LBK and use that since then if I was getting ants in my pants I could get a second brew cooking.  Obviously I have had the AIPS (ants in pants syndrome) as have 4 LBKs just for brewing.

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I have 4 LBKs and 1 conical (The name that shall not be named garbage), I have room for 8 LBK's.  My wife would kill me though if I had that much beer bottled at once every 3 weeks lol.

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Vakko, on 23 Feb 2015 - 1:45 PM, said:

I have 4 LBKs and 1 conical (The name that shall not be named garbage), I have room for 8 LBK's.  My wife would kill me though if I had that much beer bottled at once every 3 weeks lol.

I bet! That'd be like 165-166 12oz bottles (assuming 2 gallon in each LBK) even my practice of bottling half and kegging half would wear the capper out. :lol:

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I tried to buy a storage closet to put all of my conditioning beer in and I got shut down  :(  I was told that if I run out of room to store beer, then I need to slow down making until I free up spots.  Grrrrrrrrr

 

Life seemed so much easier before I had a wife...

 

If I would have know about brewing beer when I was still deploying for 12-15 months... man, the brews I would have!

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I tried to buy a storage closet to put all of my conditioning beer in and I got shut down  :(  I was told that if I run out of room to store beer, then I need to slow down making until I free up spots.  Grrrrrrrrr

 

Life seemed so much easier before I had a wife...

 

If I would have know about brewing beer when I was still deploying for 12-15 months... man, the brews I would have!

Yes, as much as we love them, we have to admit, sometimes wives just tend to get their priorites mixed up.
Vakko and RickBeer like this

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So far I have not exceeded the limits of the man cave with conditioning ales. Though I will fess up and say, it gets awfully tight in here sometimes. :) Getting 4 ea 2.5 gal kegs helped.(They still phrase it like that when you sign for stuff in the army?) I can put them under my computer desk with room for 4 more (just eyeballing it) and still not be in my way.  Just one piece, of what I hope will be, helpful advice Vakko. Drink faster!  :lol:  I will send my address if I can assist in any way  :)

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Next week starts that grey time where I will be bottling big batch #2 but #1 still hasn't finished conditioning yet.

That means I will be brewing #3 without knowing if #1 is any good :(

So I will have 2 weeks to clear out #1 before #3 is ready to be bottled.  This could be a huge log jam if I can't get more space!  and bottles!!!!

Jamescraig317 likes this

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Have a party, 3-4 friends can help break up the jam.

I'm having a baby shower on the 22nd, but I don't think I'm invited :(

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I have 3 LBKs, 2 for use of fermentation and 1 I use for secondary, batch priming or what ever comes up (this is my old yeller LBK).

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So what is the risks of transferring beer once fermented for three weeks from one LBK to another? You add the appropriate amount of sugar and then bottle? Is this something that should even be considered by a newby? Or is it really worth it in the long run? Adding two carb tablets to a 740ml bottle is pretty easy to do. Now, if it means I would be able to drink that last quarter inch of beer, maybe it is worth it!

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Ed,

 

Regardless of which priming method you use, you will still have Trub in the bottom of your bottles.  The only way to prevent that is to use force carbonation in a keg and then bottle the carbonated beer from the keg.

 

Vakko,

 

I feel your pain with the wife wondering what you are going to do with all of the beer.  My wife gifted me the 24LX and wonders why I have so many bottles and when I am going to stop brewing.  I have since bought the 8LX and now a 1 gallon carboy for test batches to decide what to brew in 5 gallon batches in the 24LX.

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So what is the risks of transferring beer once fermented for three weeks from one LBK to another? You add the appropriate amount of sugar and then bottle? Is this something that should even be considered by a newby? Or is it really worth it in the long run? Adding two carb tablets to a 740ml bottle is pretty easy to do. Now, if it means I would be able to drink that last quarter inch of beer, maybe it is worth it!

Batch prime means that every beer will have the exact same amount of carbonation (if you mixed well enough  :D  )

While carb drops appear uniform, everyone has seen the residue at the bottom of the bag.  Mr. Beer doesn't insert that for aesthetics.  As the bags move around the drops rub and subsequently lose some of it's mass.  This will cause inconsistency.

 

A field sniper will use competition ammo that is guaranteed to have so many grains of powder per round within a certain amount.

But a competition sniper might count each grain of power that goes into every round so he has the most consistent ammo available.

 

Since you're not going to count out each grain of table sugar that you put into each bottle that filled with a 1ml eye dropper, (at least I really hope not), you mix all the sugar at once so now each bottle, (no matter how much beer you put in there) will have the exact same carbonation ratio.

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BDawg62 makes a good point - you will always have trub in your bottles because the yeast turns the sugar into the carbonation and creates... trub.  

 

You add sugar to water, boil it, let it cool, then add that.  You can't just dump in sugar.

 

The advantages of batch priming include:

 

- uniform carbonation that adding sugar to each bottle, or carb drops, may not create, especially if you have different sized bottles (try splitting a carb drop to 3/4 size for a 12 oz bottle).  Another point - a carb drop is a teaspoon of sugar (assuming perfectly uniform carb drops).  Look at the chart - for 3/4 liter you add 2 drops or 2 teaspoons.  For 1/2 liter you use 1 drop or 1 teaspoons.  For 1 liter you use 2.5...  Same inaccuracy exists if you look at 20 oz (1.5 drops but 1.25 teaspoons) and 22 oz (1.5 drops and 1.5 teaspoons).  Many consider Mr. Beer's levels too carbed, so you then have to cut all those down some.  And to properly carb, you not only carb by style, but you put less sugar in if the temp is lower during fermentation than you do if the temp is higher during fermentation.  With batch priming, you figure out the level of carbonation you want, and all bottles get that level.  

 

- less trub in the bottles, although still some as explained above.

 

- easy ability to add extract flavors to the entire batch.

 

And Vakko posted similar while I was typing.

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