Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
brybry

dragons milk

Recommended Posts

The main problem with this recipe is the low IBUs. I can get the OG, ABV, and the SRM correct, but it will be double the IBUs due to the HME. Like our Novacaine, this will be a BIG beer. It will need 3 cans to match the ABV of the original recipe (11%). But 3 cans of Irish Stout will give the beer about 60+ IBUs.  I can put together a recipe using only Mr. Beer ingredients, or I can put together a more accurate recipe using some Mr. Beer ingredients plus some unhopped dry malt. Some steeping grains would also help this recipe.

I would recommend you do this in a larger fermenter such as the 8Lx. Otherwise, you may want to keep an eye on this as it ferments. Ferment at lower temps than normal to prevent overflow.

Let me know how you want to proceed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, we're going to try something a bit different here. Let me know what you think.

1 can Bewitched Amber Ale
1 can Oktoberfest Lager
1 pouch Robust LME
4 oz Carapils
4 oz Chocolate Malt
4 oz Black Patent
4 oz Flaked Barley
.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets
Safale US-05 yeast
Whiskey soaked oak chips (soak untoasted or lightly toasted oak chips in whiskey for 2-4 weeks. Feel free to save some of the whiskey to add at bottling. Just don't add too much or your yeast may not carbonate the beer. If kegging, use all the whiskey your heart desires.)

Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Add Robust LME and bring wort to a boil. Add .5 Glacier hops and boil for 5 mins. Remove pot from heat and add HME cans. Stir well. At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. Once a bit cooler, transfer to fermenter (8lx recommended). To the wort, add 1 oz whiskey soaked oak chips and stir really well before adding the yeast (if you want less oak character, add the chips after 1 week fermenting). Ferment for 3 weeks.

Here's why I chose the malts I did. Both the Bewitched Amber Ale and the Oktoberfest are full of darker caramel/crystal malts, the Oktoberfest has a good amount of Munich malts, and both cans are fairly low in IBUs. Looking at the basic recipe on their website, they use caramel malts (which are middle-of-the-road Crystal malts, Crystal 40 and 60 usually) and crystal malts (they use darker Crystal 80 and 120). The main malts they use for color are Black Patent and Chocolate. I added a Robust LME for the extra ABV.

I omitted the Nugget hops since they are really mostly for bittering and the cans already have bittering hops. But the Glacier hops get a 5 minute boil just to add a hint of their unique character into the beer. This should also balance the added malts. Again, this beer is very low IBU for a stout. Most Imperial stouts are at least 50 IBUs.

OG: 1.096 (HUGE beer! Be Careful if using an LBK!)
IBU: 31
ABV: 11%
SRM: 40+

Feel free to tweak it however you like. I may try this one out of sheer curiosity.

From the website: http://newhollandbrew.com/our-beer/dragons-milk/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main problem with this recipe is the low IBUs. I can get the OG, ABV, and the SRM correct, but it will be double the IBUs due to the HME. Like our Novacaine, this will be a BIG beer. It will need 3 cans to match the ABV of the original recipe (11%). But 3 cans of Irish Stout will give the beer about 60+ IBUs.  I can put together a recipe using only Mr. Beer ingredients, or I can put together a more accurate recipe using some Mr. Beer ingredients plus some unhopped dry malt. Some steeping grains would also help this recipe.

I would recommend you do this in a larger fermenter such as the 8Lx. Otherwise, you may want to keep an eye on this as it ferments. Ferment at lower temps than normal to prevent overflow.

Let me know how you want to proceed.

 

I'm not familiar with the pale, robust and smooth extracts, but could you just use a combination of them and add whatever hops you need?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, we're going to try something a bit different here. Let me know what you think.

1 can Bewitched Amber Ale

1 can Oktoberfest Lager

1 pouch Robust LME

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

Safale US-05 yeast

Whiskey soaked oak chips (soak untoasted or lightly toasted oak chips in whiskey for 2-4 weeks. Feel free to save some of the whiskey to add at bottling. Just don't add too much or your yeast may not carbonate the beer. If kegging, use all the whiskey your heart desires.)

Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Add Robust LME and bring wort to a boil. Add .5 Glacier hops and boil for 5 mins. Remove pot from heat and add HME cans. Stir well. At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. Once a bit cooler, transfer to fermenter (8lx recommended). To the wort, add 1 oz whiskey soaked oak chips and stir really well before adding the yeast (if you want less oak character, add the chips after 1 week fermenting). Ferment for 3 weeks.

Here's why I chose the malts I did. Both the Bewitched Amber Ale and the Oktoberfest are full of darker caramel/crystal malts, the Oktoberfest has a good amount of Munich malts, and both cans are fairly low in IBUs. Looking at the basic recipe on their website, they use caramel malts (which are middle-of-the-road Crystal malts, Crystal 40 and 60 usually) and crystal malts (they use darker Crystal 80 and 120). The main malts they use for color are Black Patent and Chocolate. I added a Robust LME for the extra ABV.

I omitted the Nugget hops since they are really mostly for bittering and the cans already have bittering hops. But the Glacier hops get a 5 minute boil just to add a hint of their unique character into the beer. This should also balance the added malts. Again, this beer is very low IBU for a stout. Most Imperial stouts are at least 50 IBUs.

OG: 1.096 (HUGE beer! Be Careful if using an LBK!)

IBU: 31

ABV: 11%

SRM: 40+

Feel free to tweak it however you like. I may try this one out of sheer curiosity.

From the website: http://newhollandbrew.com/our-beer/dragons-milk/

I got to be honest this looks pretty intimidating, but I'm going to give it a try.

 

So I guess I'll be making a trip to my LHBS, I didn't see these items on the Mr Beer site, for the 

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

And tosted Oak Chips

 

If I can get all the ingredients together in time I'll put this in the LBK once I bottle my Belgian Spiced Ale in about 2 weeks. Yea I'm going to try it in my LBK, so far I have good luck moving the LBK to my basement to keep the temps down during fermenting.

 

Thanks for putting this together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got to be honest this looks pretty intimidating, but I'm going to give it a try.

 

So I guess I'll be making a trip to my LHBS, I didn't see these items on the Mr Beer site, for the 

4 oz Carapils

4 oz Chocolate Malt

4 oz Black Patent

4 oz Flaked Barley

.5 oz Glacier Hop Pellets

And tosted Oak Chips

 

If I can get all the ingredients together in time I'll put this in the LBK once I bottle my Belgian Spiced Ale in about 2 weeks. Yea I'm going to try it in my LBK, so far I have good luck moving the LBK to my basement to keep the temps down during fermenting.

 

Thanks for putting this together.

 

I wouldn't feel too guilty, that's about $3 worth of stuff.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't feel too guilty, that's about $3 worth of stuff.  :D

 Thanks I had no idea if it was $3 or $30. Do most LHBS sell these items in these small, they seem small to me, quantities?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have got as little as 1/4oz from my LHBS. (costs me $.50)

 

I can buy any amount I want, because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it, and bag it.  1/4 oz for $.50 is highway robbery at $1.99 per pound it should be $.03.  What could you possibly use 1/4 oz in?  Or did you mean 1/4 pound?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm.. this does sound interesting (for a couple of reasons, one is that my wife makes a soap with our goat milk using a fragrance oil called dragon's blood) and I've got just the right size conical fermenter to brew it in since it's just a little bigger than my 2 LBKs.

Thanks for posting/sharing this, Tony

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can buy any amount I want, because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it, and bag it.  1/4 oz for $.50 is highway robbery at $1.99 per pound it should be $.03.  What could you possibly use 1/4 oz in?  Or did you mean 1/4 pound?

Depends on who's working, the owner lets me grind my own.  The manager prefers to do it himself(unless he has a lot of customers)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steep grains in 6 cups 160 water for 30 mins (this should be enough to cover the grains in a 4qt pot. If not, use more. Just be sure your wort is cooled before adding your yeast). After 30 mins, lift steeping bag out of pot, drain, rinse with 1 cup hot water, drain, discard grains. 

Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

At this point, you may want to try chilling the wort in an ice bath before transferring to your fermenter. 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

because my LHBS lets me measure out what I want, mill it . . .

 

Depends on who's working, the owner lets me grind my own. . . 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

 

You rinse them over the wort. Lift the straining bag up out of the wort after the steep, let it drain over the wort (a large mesh colander works well for this) and rinse the bag with 1 cup of water. Let the bag finish draining the water you just poured over the bag, then remove the bag from the colander and throw it away. The rinsing will help flush some extra sugars/dextrines/color into the wort.

The ideal pitching temp is between 60 and 70, but this can also depend on the yeast and the flavor profile you're trying to get. The yeast are going to produce a different flavor profile when pitched into 80 degree wort vs 65 degree wort. You will get a lot more fruity esters and possibly some fusels with a high pitch temp. But when using neutral yeasts, the rule of thumb is below 70 degrees to prevent off-flavors such as acetaldehyde and diacetyl. And since most off-flavors are produced within the first 72 hours of fermentation, during this time it's crucial that you get your wort down to a proper temperature and keep it consistent.

Yes, you will need the grains milled. Your LHBS should have a mill on hand. You don't need the grains pulverized, just nicely cracked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Why do I rinse the grains and steeping bag if I'm just throwing them out. Or am I supposed to rinse them and add the rinse water to my wort?

 

What is the ideal wort temp for pitching my yeast?

 

 

Do I need to grind or mill the grains I'm going to be steeping?

 

 

You would rinse them over the pot so that more goodness goes into the wort.  With steeping it is not necessary.  

 

Depends on the yeast.  Look it up at the yeast manufacturer - for S05 I would pitch anywhere in the 60s.

 

Grains must be milled for steeping.  In the absence of a mill, you can keep them in plastic bag and use a rolling pin on them.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would rinse them over the pot so that more goodness goes into the wort.  With steeping it is not necessary.  

Yeah, if your mostly steeping specialty grains, rinsing isn't really that necessary since there aren't really any fermentables in them. I still do it anyway, especially when using grains for color. It's personal preference really.

Also, it's a matter of debate whether to squeeze the bag or not to squeeze the bag. I tend to just give it a very gentle squeeze. Too much will risk harsh tannins getting into your beer, especially when using darker malts (Carafa is an exception since it's usually dehusked/debittered.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×