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sabres032

All Extract IPA recipe

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I've been searching the interwebz for a simple extract IPA recipe and ran across one on the brewing with Briess website. The instructions say to boil the bittering hops in water for 40 minutes, second hop addition for 10 minutes, flameout then add all the extract, 7.6 lbs in total. Then to bring wort to boil for additional hops schedule.

From what I'm reading here and there this gives zero hop utilization for the bittering hops since there isn't any wort for the hop oils to attach to during the boil. Is the hop bitter and flavor just coming from the massive amount of hops the recipe calls for (6oz in total) or is there really some method to the brewers madness???

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/blog/recipe-of-the-week-easy-peasy-ipa/

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I get most of my recipes from AIH.  Here's their IPA page.  You can either buy the ingredients from them, or use the instructions to build your own.  Nearly all, if not all, of their extract recipes has you start with 2.5 gallons of water, steep grains, add LME, bring to a boil, and then boil for 60 minutes (or less depending on hop additions).  I don't care what color my beer is, so I boil all the LME as their instructions say, and it may come out slightly darker than style - but again I don't care.

 

In addition to Scoutbill's points, you need to boil any BULK extract you have.  If you use a can of Briess or similar, that can be added at flameout (apart from the hops point Scoutbill made).  I buy bulk LME where they fill my containers with as much as I want, and the boiling ensures that the LME is free of bugs.

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How big of a brew pot do you use in order to boil 2-2.5 Gallons? I used (My wife's) a 12qt (3G) that I used for my 1 Gallon recipe, but I was thinking that might be a bit small to boil 2-2.5G?

 

I use a 3-gallon pot to boil 2.5 gallons of water in - but it's sketchy. A good rolling boil would spill out some liquids so I keep the boil to just below "rolling" stage.

 

I need a 4- or 5-gallon pot soon... I want to start making AG/BIAB batches!

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Always go bigger on the brewpot, IMHO.  I'd go 9 gallon...   ;)

 

As for the Briess recipe...  who am I to argue with Briess, but I'd definitely add maybe 20% or so of the extract to that hop boil.  You will get some utilization boiling in water (though it's generally thought that it's a lesser quality bitter extraction as well as less utilization), but you'll get much better utilization with some malt in there (1.040 is about perfect...  higher concentration of sugars will block isomerization).  Of course, by boiling the extract, you will darken from the malliard reaction (and potentially caramelize a bit), but I wouldn't worry about that too much.

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I'm still searching around for a recipe since I have one batch fermenting and one on deck. Gives me some time to peruse the interwebz for that "just right" IPA recipe or what I'd need to build my own.

Thanks for the recipe links and tips, guys.

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Here's the IPA that I do and really like...

 

House IPA 
 
American IPA 
Type: All Grain
Batch Size: 2.80 gal
 
Ingredients
 
Grain:
7 lbs 2-Row (2.0 SRM) Grain 87.50 % 
8.0 oz Melanoiden Malt (20.0 SRM) Grain 6.25 % 
8.0 oz Wheat Malt, Pale (Weyermann) (2.0 SRM) Grain 6.25 % 
 
(For extract instead of all grain, I'd probably look at something like 4.5lbs of pale lme, and maybe 0.5 lbs of wheat dme)
 
Hops:
0.35 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] (60 min) Hops 26.1 IBU 
0.34 oz Warrior [15.80 %] (60 min) Hops 30.9 IBU 
0.35 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (45 min) Hops 16.3 IBU 
0.34 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (30 min) Hops 13.2 IBU 
1.00 oz Cascade [5.40 %] (15 min) Hops 15.9 IBU 
0.58 oz Cascade [5.40 %] (Dry Hop 3 days) Hops - 
 
Yeast:
1 Pkgs BRY-97 (American West Coast) Yeast-Ale 
 
 
Beer Profile
 
Est Original Gravity: 1.067 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.017 SG 
Est Alcohol by Vol: 6.50 % 
Bitterness: 102.4 IBU 
Est Calories: 304 cal/pint 
Est Color: 6.7 SRM

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Here's the IPA that I do and really like...

House IPA

American IPA

Type: All Grain

Batch Size: 2.80 gal

Ingredients

Grain:

7 lbs 2-Row (2.0 SRM) Grain 87.50 %

8.0 oz Melanoiden Malt (20.0 SRM) Grain 6.25 %

8.0 oz Wheat Malt, Pale (Weyermann) (2.0 SRM) Grain 6.25 %

(For extract, I'd probably look at something like 4.5lbs of pale lme, and maybe 0.5 lbs of wheat dme)

Hops:

0.35 oz Simcoe [13.00 %] (60 min) Hops 26.1 IBU

0.34 oz Warrior [15.80 %] (60 min) Hops 30.9 IBU

0.35 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (45 min) Hops 16.3 IBU

0.34 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (30 min) Hops 13.2 IBU

1.00 oz Cascade [5.40 %] (15 min) Hops 15.9 IBU

0.58 oz Cascade [5.40 %] (Dry Hop 3 days) Hops -

Yeast:

1 Pkgs BRY-97 (American West Coast) Yeast-Ale

Beer Profile

Est Original Gravity: 1.067 SG

Est Final Gravity: 1.017 SG

Est Alcohol by Vol: 6.50 %

Bitterness: 102.4 IBU

Est Calories: 304 cal/pint

Est Color: 6.7 SRM

That sounds delish but I'm not at the all grain brewing level yet. I like the idea you made of light LME and some wheat DME. The rest sounds easy enough. Thank you.

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I've been searching the interwebz for a simple extract IPA recipe and ran across one on the brewing with Briess website. The instructions say to boil the bittering hops in water for 40 minutes, second hop addition for 10 minutes, flameout then add all the extract, 7.6 lbs in total. Then to bring wort to boil for additional hops schedule.

From what I'm reading here and there this gives zero hop utilization for the bittering hops since there isn't any wort for the hop oils to attach to during the boil. Is the hop bitter and flavor just coming from the massive amount of hops the recipe calls for (6oz in total) or is there really some method to the brewers madness???

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/blog/recipe-of-the-week-easy-peasy-ipa/

 

 

I'm with you, hopefully that brew master tested his recipe.  Wort actually boils at a higher temp than water.  It has always been my understanding that this higher temp is actually needed to bind and sparks those alpha acids into the bittering love so many of us enjoy.

 

.... and 6 ounces of hops is a lot for even a 5 gal boil.  

 

Just for kicks ... and you like simple IPA recipes ... give these 2 a try ... 

 

http://www.mrbeer.com/refills/recipes/brew-de-ale-ze-bub-recipe

 

http://www.mrbeer.com/refills/recipes/surly-dog-ipa-recipe

 

 

easy peasy and yummy

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SO many great IPA recipes out there.

I just did this Citra IPA and was really happy.

2.5 gallon

Steeped=

.5 lbs Caramel Malt (belgian-franco is what I used)

.5 lbs Carapils

 

1 lbs Wheat DME

3.3 lbs Golden Light LME

 

1 oz Citra Hops 60 mins

.5 oz Cascade 30 mins

1 oz Citra flame out

1 oz Citra Leaf dry hop last 5 days

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SO many great IPA recipes out there.

I just did this Citra IPA and was really happy.

2.5 gallon

Steeped=

.5 lbs Caramel Malt (belgian-franco is what I used)

.5 lbs Carapils

1 lbs Wheat DME

3.3 lbs Golden Light LME

1 oz Citra Hops 60 mins

.5 oz Cascade 30 mins

1 oz Citra flame out

1 oz Citra Leaf dry hop last 5 days

I actually have that recipe book marked...

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Some would say that 6 ounces of hops is barely enough to make an IPA from in a 5-gallon batch.

 

  ;)

LOL - you kids and your IPAs!  Really, depending on what hop you choose, you can get your IBU pretty darn high.  I know this one kid, he made a 5 gallon batch with 2 pounds of hops ... yes that's TWO POUNDS.  

 

I'm an odd-ball, I hate IPAs - 60 to 75 IBU tops for me, which would generally be considered like drinking water to most hop heads

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LOL - you kids and your IPAs!  Really, depending on what hop you choose, you can get your IBU pretty darn high.  I know this one kid, he made a 5 gallon batch with 2 pounds of hops ... yes that's TWO POUNDS.  

 

I'm an odd-ball, I hate IPAs - 60 to 75 IBU tops for me, which would generally be considered like drinking water to most hop heads

Who you calling a kid??? I'm a child of the 60's pushing middle age.... And a glorified hop head... :)

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LOL - you kids and your IPAs!  Really, depending on what hop you choose, you can get your IBU pretty darn high.  I know this one kid, he made a 5 gallon batch with 2 pounds of hops ... yes that's TWO POUNDS.  

 

I'm an odd-ball, I hate IPAs - 60 to 75 IBU tops for me, which would generally be considered like drinking water to most hop heads

 

Id call any pale-r ale with 60-75 IBUs an IPA. Really, it depends on how the bitterness is perceived. I love Stone's Ruination DIPA, and it has over 100 IBUs. Conversely, I hate Uinta's Hop Nosh, with about 82 IBUs - way too bitter, like biting into a grapefruit rind. Love, Love, LOVE Heady Topper & Pliny The Elder which I am sure has way over 80 IBUs. It really just all depends.

 

But at my heart, I am a malt-lover. I love brown ales and my favourite beer of all time was Devil Mountain Railroad's Five Malt Ale. Irish Reds are gorgeous things, I just have expanded my palate to accept IPAs.

 

That 5-gallon batch with two pounds of hops? I would love to try it, but no guarantees I would love it itself.

 

 :)

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That 5-gallon batch with two pounds of hops? I would love to try it, but no guarantees I would love it itself.

 

  :)

 

 

I didn't get to try it myself.  I work with the guy who made it.  The brew master from our LHBS said the AA was so high, that it burned and numbed his tongue for a long time.  He couldn't taste anything

 

I agree, 75 IBU is an IPA ... but considering what is on the market ... it's still kind of weak.  I'm a malt-head, but I do like to go as high as 60 for a good 'lawn mower' ale.  It all depends on the hops ... 

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I didn't get to try it myself.  I work with the guy who made it.  The brew master from our LHBS said the AA was so high, that it burned and numbed his tongue for a long time.  He couldn't taste anything

 

I find that strange considering the human mouth can only taste up to 100 IBUs. You can drink a beer that is 1000 IBUs and it will taste like it is 100 because your taste buds cannot percieve anything higher than that. Once you go beyond 100 IBUs for bittering, you're just wasting hops.

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I find that strange considering the human mouth can only taste up to 100 IBUs. You can drink a beer that is 1000 IBUs and it will taste like it is 100 because your taste buds cannot percieve anything higher than that. Once you go beyond 100 IBUs for bittering, you're just wasting hops.

 

That's a bit of science I wasn't aware of ... learn something new everyday.  As I've never tried it, could making a 1000 IBU beer cause damage to the mouth?  Kind of like eating a ghost pepper or something extra hot.

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That's a bit of science I wasn't aware of ... learn something new everyday.  As I've never tried it, could making a 1000 IBU beer cause damage to the mouth?  Kind of like eating a ghost pepper or something extra hot.

 

No. Like I said, it would be no different in flavor than a 100 IBU beer.

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