hoosier beer?

Nilla Porter

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I tried to make the Nilla Porter recipe twice now. The second time was better, but I keep getting a very sour after flavor that gets worse as it stays in the bottle longer. I followed the recipe exactly. I am using a Mexican vanilla, not a fake vanilla extract. could it be changing during the conditioning? I would really like to make a smooth vanilla porter, and this aint it. All my other recipes and things that I have tried on other beers have turned out pretty good. This one is really starting to rustle my jimmies and any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

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I've made vanilla porter using the MB porter HME. I added 2 tbsp pure vanilla extract after 1week of fermentling. Turned out real good.

 

Here's the whole recipe:

 

8 oz English Chocolate steeping grailn

1 lb dark LME

Porter HME

1/2 pack US- 05

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Could be an infection.  I doubt your vanilla itself is getting sour with age, certainly not "very sour".  You are fortunate in that sour beers are in vogue right now.  Just find the nearest mustached, skinny pants, stocking cap in July wearing hipster and exchange your beer for their kombucha, fixed gear conversation or whatever they are into now.

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Have no idea, but I'd do some research on what vanilla people use, and how many are using Mexican vanilla.  Often I see people saying "I made this and it's not as it should be, and all I did was change _____".  If you make it exactly as intended and it comes out fine then you know your answer.  

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It will not matter where the vanilla comes from as long as you pasteurize everything that comes into contact with your beer.  Vanilla orchids originated in Mexico.

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Mexican vanilla, made from the native V. planifolia, is produced in much less quantity and marketed as the vanilla from the land of its origin. Vanilla sold in tourist markets around Mexico is sometimes not actual vanilla extract, but is mixed with an extract of the tonka bean, which contains coumarin. Tonka bean extract smells and tastes like vanilla, but coumarin has been shown to cause liver damage in lab animals and is banned in food in the US by the Food and Drug Administration since 1954.

 

Source:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vanilla

MRB Josh R, MnMBeer and RickBeer like this

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well the "beans" should be pretty much the same wherever they are grown as long as they look like vanilla.  They aren't really beans though and I think only the Mexican ones are naturally pollinated.

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It's amazing that the term "vanilla" came to mean plain, ordinary, even hum-drum.

 

Out of tens of thousands of orchid species only vanilla is eaten. The vines grow hundreds of feet up the trunks of the host tree (all orchids are parasites) just so the flowers can get to the sunlight. These flowers are available for reproduction only one day a year and if the two natural pollinators (a small bee and a rare hummingbird) are not available the tedious job must be done by hand. If this is done correctly, about six weeks later the plant will offer its reward of vanilla pods. Or as we call them, beans.

The beans are fully grown at six inches length, although a few will grow larger. But they must mature for as long as nine more months. Even then they are useless for cooking until they cure: step one is a nice hot bath in an electric kettle. Then he spreads the beans out to dry on a blanket. Each night they must be rolled up, and each day spread out again. The process can take as long as four months. Over this time the pods will change from firm and green to wrinkled and brown.

Vanilla is grown in a few places: Tahiti (these beans are a little, well, "vanilla"), Mexico (these beans are better but the quality is erratic), and finally Madagascar. Mexico once held the reputation as the finest vanilla producer, but time and circumstance handed that honor to Madagascar, the present world quality leader. Madagascar vanilla is sometimes called bourbon vanilla after the name of the island at the time vanilla was first cultivated there (the time of the Bourbon kings of France).

A quick warning off of vanilla extracts from Mexico. Some of these are processed with parts of the Tonka bean. The Tonka bean tastes like vanilla but contains carcinogens. Cheap Mexican vanilla may well be artificial.

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How long are you fermenting it for and at what temp? It could simply be acetaldehyde from not fermenting long enough or fermenting too warm. However, it could also be an infection. It really depends on what you mean by "sour" (sour like vinegar or sour like green apples).

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What temperature should I ferment the Nilla Porter at? I have various places to use that range from 63 to 70 degrees F.

How about temperature for bottle conditioning?

Thanks!

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11 minutes ago, Iowa Brewer said:

What temperature should I ferment the Nilla Porter at? I have various places to use that range from 63 to 70 degrees F.

How about temperature for bottle conditioning?

Thanks!

 

Ferment wort temp 64-67*F (NOT Ambient air temp, during fermentation, wort temps can be about 3*F higher than ambient temp)  Condition 70-72*F

Iowa Brewer and SilverBrewerWI like this

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18 minutes ago, Iowa Brewer said:

Thanks hotrod3539 and SilverBrewerWI!

 

You're welcome.  Just keep in mind fermenting at the lower temps and, especially carb/conditioning at the temps I do pretty much ensures you need to do 3 weeks fermenting and an extended time for carbing all IMHO which aint worth much yet.

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