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3 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

All the things I thought I knew, and Josh has to change them.  :angry:

 

It will always be the Monster Mash to me, no matter what he says.  :ph34r:

 

Hey, as long as the Monsters are Mashing at 165 for 30 minutes, they can call it the Monster Mash all they want.

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Steeping Hops? 

 

So I am looking at a recipe, and am confused. It is an all grain recipe, but at the end it calls for steeping the hops? How would you do this, and why? Says to "

Steep/Whirlpool 0.0 min"

 

 

Step #8  -- Would probably do this as a BIAB method. 

Recipe: Imperial Barleywine (63) Double Malted Bliss	TYPE: All Grain
Style: English Barleywine
---RECIPE SPECIFICATIONS-----------------------------------------------
SRM: 13.1 SRM		SRM RANGE: 10.0-22.0 SRM
IBU: 54.3 IBUs Tinseth	IBU RANGE: 35.0-70.0 IBUs
OG: 1.161 SG		OG RANGE: 1.080-1.125 SG
FG: 1.033 SG		FG RANGE: 1.018-1.035 SG
BU:GU: 0.338		Calories: 608.2 kcal/12oz	Est ABV: 17.4 %		
EE%: 71.00 %	Batch: 4.75 gal      Boil: 9.74 gal	BT: 240 Mins

---WATER CHEMISTRY ADDITIONS----------------
   

Total Grain Weight: 28 lbs 8.0 oz	Total Hops: 4.00 oz oz.
---MASH/STEEP PROCESS------MASH PH:5.40 ------
>>>>>>>>>>-ADD WATER CHEMICALS BEFORE GRAINS!!<<<<<<<
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
27 lbs 8.0 oz         Pale Malt, Maris Otter (3.0 SRM)         Grain         1        96.5 %        
4.0 oz                Caramel Malt - 20L (Briess) (20.0 SRM)   Grain         2        0.9 %         
4.0 oz                Caramel Malt - 40L (Briess) (40.0 SRM)   Grain         3        0.9 %         
4.0 oz                Caramel Malt - 60L (Briess) (60.0 SRM)   Grain         4        0.9 %         
4.0 oz                Special Roast (Briess) (50.0 SRM)        Grain         5        0.9 %         


Name              Description                             Step Temperat Step Time     
Low Mash          Add 30.00 qt of water at 160.8 F        145.0 F       90 min        
High Mash         Decoct 3.01 qt of mash and boil it      150.0 F       120 min       

---SPARGE PROCESS---
>>>>>>>>>>-RECYCLE FIRST RUNNINGS & VERIFY GRAIN/MLT TEMPS: 72.0 F/72.0 F
>>>>>>>>>>-ADD BOIL CHEMICALS BEFORE FWH
Fly sparge with 5.91 gal water at 168.0 F

---BOIL PROCESS-----------------------------
Est Pre_Boil Gravity: 1.087 SG	Est OG: 1.161 SG
Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
1.00 oz               Magnum [15.80 %] - Boil 90.0 min         Hop           6        43.8 IBUs     
2.00 oz               Goldings, East Kent [4.10 %] - Boil 15.0 Hop           7        10.5 IBUs     

Amt                   Name                                     Type          #        %/IBU         
1.00 oz               Goldings, East Kent [4.10 %] - Steep/Whi Hop           8        0.0 IBUs      

 

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16 minutes ago, TacTicToe said:

Interesting. I thought a fly sparge was supposed to achieve a higher efficiency? Why would a batch sparge do better? 

 

Fly sparging IS more efficient IF it's done correctly. Using a proper sparge arm is doing it correctly. Pouring a bucket of water, as Jim pointed out, is not. If you don't have a fly sparge arm that can keep a constant flow, you're better off batch sparging.

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Fly sparging is a great method but adds allot more time to your brew day. Large brewers like this method for they can get the most out of there grain bill. For the small batch folks adding more malt to the recipe makes up for the OG difference if you want to save time. Lets say a recipe calls for a 10lb. for 5 gallons mash. Adding one or two extra pounds (pending on your set up) makes up the sparging difference to hit your marks. So you can see a large brewer would save on the grain cost. I personally I do all grain 5 and 10 gallon batches and like to fly sparge  not for the savings but the love of a complete brewing experience.

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I batch sparge and get over 80% brewhouse efficiency.  Takes me 2 minutes to drain my mash tun and then I add all of my sparge water, stir and let it sit for 5 minutes and then another 2 minutes to drain.  I could drain faster but I drain through a funnel with a screen filter to catch any grain matter that comes through.

 

A lot faster and easier than fly sparging.  No worry about extracting tannins from the PH getting too high.

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This looks like a good read for those looking further into malt selection. There is probably more interesting stuff there too.

 

http://homebrewacademy.com/malt-hot-steep-method/?utm_medium=ppc&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=hot+steep

 

The recipes on this site are interesting and also seem to have a good conversational discussion built in - not just a list of ingredients.

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@MRB Josh R question.....I was making the black beer’d porter-recipe a few weeks ago. 1 week left to go in the fermenter. When I was steeping the grains the water was getting cooler during the 30 min and I might have let the water temp get higher than the 175 range for a short period of time. Did I ruin the wort at that point? I’m scheduled to bottle it next week. Thanks. 

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On 2/25/2018 at 7:53 PM, Jdub said:

@MRB Josh R question.....I was making the black beer’d porter-recipe a few weeks ago. 1 week left to go in the fermenter. When I was steeping the grains the water was getting cooler during the 30 min and I might have let the water temp get higher than the 175 range for a short period of time. Did I ruin the wort at that point? I’m scheduled to bottle it next week. Thanks. 

 

Most likely not. Since this is a partial and not an all-grain, temps aren't as crucial. The worst case scenario is that you extracted a small amount of astringency from the grain husks, but with such a small amount and such a short period of time, this most likely won't be the case. In the future, it doesn't hurt to add a small amount of cold water to bring the temp back down.

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On 2/25/2018 at 8:53 PM, Jdub said:

@MRB Josh R question.....I was making the black beer’d porter-recipe a few weeks ago. 1 week left to go in the fermenter. When I was steeping the grains the water was getting cooler during the 30 min and I might have let the water temp get higher than the 175 range for a short period of time. Did I ruin the wort at that point? I’m scheduled to bottle it next week. Thanks. 

 

I did the same with a partial mash Porter; temps got up around 170 for a bit.  It was only the second or third PM recipe I'd done and man, I was worried.  The end result tasted fine.

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1 hour ago, Shrike said:

 

I did the same with a partial mash Porter; temps got up around 170 for a bit.  It was only the second or third PM recipe I'd done and man, I was worried.  The end result tasted fine.

It was actually north of 180 for a few minutes and i read this thread and was like.....😟

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On 2/27/2018 at 4:52 PM, Shrike said:

 

I did the same with a partial mash Porter; temps got up around 170 for a bit.  It was only the second or third PM recipe I'd done and man, I was worried.  The end result tasted fine.

I brewed the tb ipa a few weeks ago and steeped the grains perfectly ( I think). They smelled so good. Pretty intrigued by the PM recipes. Brew was in cooler at low 60’s for 1st week. Now just leaving alone for final 2 weeks. Not even changing water bottles anymore bc I keep holding 65-68. Probe taped to lbk. Can’t wait to try this in a month or so. 

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@MRB Josh R if adding grains will enhance any recipe, I have a question. I have “that voodoo that you do” recipe on deck for my next batch.  What would you recommend if anything for steeping grains? Or just follow the recipe as is? Thanks. 

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13 hours ago, Jdub said:

@MRB Josh R if adding grains will enhance any recipe, I have a question. I have “that voodoo that you do” recipe on deck for my next batch.  What would you recommend if anything for steeping grains? Or just follow the recipe as is? Thanks. 

 

I would probably enhance that recipe with 2 oz Carapils (for body and head retention) and maybe 2-4 oz malted wheat. Or you can do 2-4 oz flaked barley and 2-4oz 2-row. Or if you want a maltier beer, add 2-4 oz of Munich or Vienna. Read the descriptions of the malt and decide for yourself. Don't be afraid to experiment a little.

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38 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

I would probably enhance that recipe with 2 oz Carapils (for body and head retention) and maybe 2-4 oz malted wheat. Or you can do 2-4 oz flaked barley and 2-4oz 2-row. Or if you want a maltier beer, ass 2-4 oz of Munich or Vienna. Read the descriptions of the malt and decide for yourself. Don't be afraid to experiment a little.

 

@MRB Josh R, I don't claim to have anywhere near the experience that you do, nor am I conversant in every brewing technique, but could you explain, for the education of all on the forum, how one "ass(es)" 2-4 oz of Munich or Vienna"?  Specifically, the steps in the assing technique?

 

:blink:

 

:D

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2 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

 

@MRB Josh R, I don't claim to have anywhere near the experience that you do, nor am I conversant in every brewing technique, but could you explain, for the education of all on the forum, how one "ass(es)" 2-4 oz of Munich or Vienna"?  Specifically, the steps in the assing technique?

 

:blink:

 

:D

 

*add

 

lol! :lol:

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I brewed the Calavera stout recipe the other day, that calls for black malt, and chocolate malt. The grains in those two were quite a bit different looking than the grains in my Carapils. 

 

@MRB Josh R I hand crushed the Carapils but the black and chocolate malt grains looked more like Folgers Crystals in their freeze dried coffee, than actual grains. I went ahead and lighly hand crushed them, but was wondering if that was necessary since they appeared to already have gone through some processing stage?

 

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52 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Mr. Beer ships grains already milled.

Thanks Rickbeer! Explains the dust in the bags. Does that effect the freshness of the grains?

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4 hours ago, Cato said:

I brewed the Calavera stout recipe the other day, that calls for black malt, and chocolate malt. The grains in those two were quite a bit different looking than the grains in my Carapils. 

 

@MRB Josh R I hand crushed the Carapils but the black and chocolate malt grains looked more like Folgers Crystals in their freeze dried coffee, than actual grains. I went ahead and lighly hand crushed them, but was wondering if that was necessary since they appeared to already have gone through some processing stage?

 

 

Don't crush the grains anymore than they already are. This will reduce the efficiency of them and can promote more tannins in your beer causing an unpleasant astringency. We mill all grains before we ship them because we know that not everyone has a grain mill at home.

 

The black and chocolate malts are kilned at higher temps. That is why they are darker.

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