Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Marlymarl

Carbinating and bottiling

Recommended Posts

I bottled my first batch Sunday and today I noticed one of my bottles is more firmer than the others.... conditioning at 70-75 degrees air temperature... Should I be concern of it busting since the recommended time is four weeks and it's only been four days

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I would only be concerned if the bottom of the plastic bottle was already deforming so that it would not stand up. Also I would recommend marking bottles at the end with "T" so you know they are trub bottles, at least until you are used to then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/1/2016 at 2:01 AM, jsherman said:

 I would only be concerned if the bottom of the plastic bottle was already deforming so that it would not stand up. Also I would recommend marking bottles at the end with "T" so you know they are trub bottles, at least until you are used to then.

 

Good idea to put a "T" on the last bottle.  I also line up the bottles as they are filled and stick a mailing label on each one that shows recipe name, fermenting start date, bottling date, and bottle sequence number.  It's not a fancy bottle label but it helps me tell which bottle is which.  I can make the labels pretty quickly on the computer using an Avery label template for address labels.  And they peel off pretty easily when I'm rinsing the empty bottles out.  I also put a little white dot (just using "white out") on the top of the screw-on caps for my plastic PET bottles so I know how many times I've used a cap.  I figure after I get four or five or six dots on a cap, I'll toss it.  Yes, I know....I'm OCD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, K5WX said:

 

Good idea to put a "T" on the last bottle.  I also line up the bottles as they are filled and stick a mailing label on each one that shows recipe name, fermenting start date, bottling date, and bottle sequence number.  It's not a fancy bottle label but it helps me tell which bottle is which.  I can make the labels pretty quickly on the computer using an Avery label template for address labels.  And they peel off pretty easily when I'm rinsing the empty bottles out.  I also put a little white dot (just using "white out") on the top of the screw-on caps for my plastic PET bottles so I know how many times I've used a cap.  I figure after I get four or five or six dots on a cap, I'll toss it.  Yes, I know....I'm OCD.

Not always a bad thing! This is a good idea with the dots on the cap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, twadams777 said:

So how long do caps normally last, and when you replace caps do you also replace bottles?

Also, why label your trub bottle? Is it drinkable, but has sediment in the bottom?

 

I've never replaced a cap in 5 years or so. Other guys replace after 5-10 uses.

The trub bottle is fine for drinking, just has more trub in the bottom because it's from the bottom of the lbk. It usually carbs faster because it gets the most yeast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, slym2none said:

Carbonation is dependent on the amount of priming sugar, not the yeast. Unless the other bottles are yeast-starved, your trub bottle will not carb up any quicker, due to the amount of yeast.

 

:)

You are correct in terms of CO2 volume. The yeast can only make a certain amount of CO2 off from your priming sugar.

 

I can tell you you are wrong about carbing quicker. More yeast can metabolize sugar faster, because 8 people can eat 8 pieces of pizza a lot faster than 4 people. Also when I used to use plastic bottles, my trub bottles often carbed a week before the early bottles.

 

And the reason I marked trub bottles was for my own safety. Trub bottles have more sediment, and too much can be a laxative. So I was careful pouring my "T" bottles.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×