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Bonsai & Brew

How about a Dark Wheat Lager?

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What do you brew when you order a Canadian Blonde refill off Amazon and they send an expired can of Bavarian Weissbier instead?  First, order future refills directly from Mr. Beer and secondly -- experiment!  Since I've got more than enough Dunkelweizen conditioning at the moment, I thought I would try a wheat lager.  As far as I can tell from the BJCP, I'm on my own here.  Here is what I came up with:

 

Bavarian Weissbier HME

Golden LME Softpack

Robust LME Softpack

Columbus hops

Saflager W-34/70 lager yeast

 

Ferment @ 55 F for 2-3 weeks

 

OG 1.042, SRM 23, IBU 19, ABV-TBD

 

Note:  I have not used Columbus hops yet but based on the description, the citrusy, earthy quality sounds exactly like what I'm going for with this lager!  See you at bottling time:D!

 

 

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"Interesting" in a "might be OK" way, or "interesting" as in "Good Luck with that" way?  :rolleyes:

 

PS/OT  I can't believe that craft brewers have used up all the good Franken names for their experimental beers.  Frankenbier, Frankenlager, even found a Franken-weizenbock already in use.     

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Status of the Unbavarian Dark Wheat Lager:

 

I'm not looking to cut corners here, but is the diacetyl rest always prescribed when brewing lagers?  I am asking because I did a Day 17 hydrometer reading (1.008) along with a much anticipated tasting and am not detecting any diacetyl or acetaldehyde flavors.  What I did taste was the pleasant citrusy (mostly grapefruit) sensation of the Columbus hops, overlaying a pretty nice malty base.  Color is classic Amber and reminded me of a couple of the Bewitched/Oktoberfest recipes that I've made.  So, after all of that, I am still going to start a 3 day diacetyl rest and take my time with this one, but so far, soooo good!

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On ‎1‎/‎5‎/‎2016 at 1:30 PM, Bonsai & Brew said:

"Interesting" in a "might be OK" way, or "interesting" as in "Good Luck with that" way?  :rolleyes:

 

PS/OT  I can't believe that craft brewers have used up all the good Franken names for their experimental beers.  Frankenbier, Frankenlager, even found a Franken-weizenbock already in use.     

how bout Stainkun Frainkun? Franken Beans?

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there are methods of making lagers that do NOT use a D-rest... ( Narziss method) the claim being the appropriate pitch temp.  I believe, and you should fact check me on this, that if you pitch lower than fermenting temp - say 35 to 45 F - and then slowly raise to fermenting temp - say 55 F - then D-rest can be avoided.  

 

I guess  the thought is the diacetyl is a result of pitching at higher than fermenting temps.  

 

"..... warm pitching is associated with an increased level of ester, diacetyl and...."  http://braukaiser.com/wiki/index.php?title=Fermenting_Lagers

 

In the end, I don't think it will hurt to do it... and might clean it up a bit more if anything.  

 

 

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Interesting (there's that word again)...After tasting this beer at lager temperature a couple days ago, I was pleasantly surprised with the flavor.  When I bottled it last night (following the diacetyl rest), it was almost like "who spiked my beer with grapefruit juice?"  I know that it has a few weeks now to carbonate and then condition, but I am sure hoping that things mellow out -- otherwise I may have brewed what I would call The Mother of All Lawnmower Beers.  I definitely should have been more conservative with my choice of hops with this one!

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On January 24, 2016 at 8:39 AM, Bonsai & Brew said:

I will not abandon my creation.  I will drink this beer cold.  Like really, really cold.

 

Hey @sabres032, and for those of you keeping score at home, I thought that I would provide a quick update on the status of this beer.  After just 13 days in the bottle, I grabbed the trub bottle (about 300 mLs or so) and did a quick chill on it.  After 30 min. in the freezer wrapped in a wet paper towel (the beer that is, not me...), I poured it into a mug and looked at it for awhile.  That was a very nice pour with good carbonation, hops aroma, persistent head, and very lager-like.  So far, so good.  It tastes fine!  The Columbus is strong, but did not completely overpower the malt.  Although definitely unbalanced, it does have a very nice lager feel to it.  I will check it again in a couple weeks, but I am excited to do a second iteration of this lagered weissbier recipe.  I will go with Saaz or Hallertau hops, and get the citrus flavor from some orange peel instead.  Add a little cinnamon and ginger and I just might get close to the seasonal Sam Adams Winter Lager that started all of this! :)

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I leave a home brew in the fridge longer than just the amount of time it takes for it to get cold because I believe in the benefits of cold conditioning. 

 

But I'll cool a commercial beer in a hurry. 

 

For future reference, if you want to cool a beer quickly, the fastest way is with an ice slurry (mixture of ice and water). To supercharge that, salt the ice. 

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2 minutes ago, bpgreen said:

I leave a home brew in the fridge longer than just the amount of time it takes for it to get cold because I believe in the benefits of cold conditioning. 

 

But I'll cool a commercial beer in a hurry. 

 

For future reference, if you want to cool a beer quickly, the fastest way is with an ice slurry (mixture of ice and water). To supercharge that, salt the ice. 

Absolutely.  This is what happens if you don't plan ahead, and I normally would throw some beers in the fridge for at least 3 days prior to consumption.  For tonight, it was basically waste the trub bottle to see what's going on with this brew.  Thanks for the feedback!

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13 hours ago, Bonsai & Brew said:

 

 

Hey @sabres032, and for those of you keeping score at home, I thought that I would provide a quick update on the status of this beer.  After just 13 days in the bottle, I grabbed the trub bottle (about 300 mLs or so) and did a quick chill on it.  After 30 min. in the freezer wrapped in a wet paper towel (the beer that is, not me...), I poured it into a mug and looked at it for awhile.  That was a very nice pour with good carbonation, hops aroma, persistent head, and very lager-like.  So far, so good.  It tastes fine!  The Columbus is strong, but did not completely overpower the malt.  Although definitely unbalanced, it does have a very nice lager feel to it.  I will check it again in a couple weeks, but I am excited to do a second iteration of this lagered weissbier recipe.  I will go with Saaz or Hallertau hops, and get the citrus flavor from some orange peel instead.  Add a little cinnamon and ginger and I just might get close to the seasonal Sam Adams Winter Lager that started all of this! :)

 

Glad to hear your creation turned out OK. 

 

If I may suggest something. Instead of changing the recipe to something completely different, brew this one again with slight changes to the grain bill and hop schedule to achieve the balance you are looking for. Once you achieve perfection then you can create your next beer. 

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Usually I would wait till tomorrow AM to post a 'watchya drinkin', but really enjoying how this experimental brew turned out.  Sure, it's had a few months to mellow out, but I actually wanted to have a 2nd one.  The name "Unbavarian Dark Wheat Lager" remains very appropriate with this one though, cuz you would never guess that I used Weissbier HME!?

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I might try that as I have a bunch of the Weissbier cans I got cheap. Also have 2 batches of Dunkel conditioning (trying one early it was quite fruity, lots of banana and fairly sweet from the 1 lb Trad Dark DME I used). I think it will be good.

 

The other batch I am not so sure - I was using dark wheat grain and it seems much lighter - maybe I did not do the grain properly - the liquid did not seem that sweet. Maybe I needed some base malt too. Probably quite drinkable though. It smelled awesome while fermenting.

Weissbier can +

+12 oz Dark Wheat Grain
+4 oz Vienna Malt grain
+4 oz Munich Malt grain
+2 oz Cara80 grain
+1 oz pale Choc Malt grain
flameout hop 0.5 Hallertauer

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On ‎2‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 7:21 PM, bpgreen said:

I leave a home brew in the fridge longer than just the amount of time it takes for it to get cold because I believe in the benefits of cold conditioning. 

 

But I'll cool a commercial beer in a hurry. 

 

For future reference, if you want to cool a beer quickly, the fastest way is with an ice slurry (mixture of ice and water). To supercharge that, salt the ice. 

creeps has a method of cooling beer bottles in just minutes in the freezer. take a water soaked paper towel and wrap it around the bottle and put into freezer for about 10 min. I tried it and it works, however, if u want to cool a 6 pack or more, then ur method is more efficient

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