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wagonblott

Hops

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7 minutes ago, wagonblott said:

Yes, What's the sack for,

the sack... we used to have a great community member who said "Hops go Commando"  its a preference thing I guess.  You put the hops in a hop sack and you can pull them out or leave them in at bottling day and be left with less trub maybe?  You throw the hops in without a sack and they lay at the bottom of the LBK when fermentation is complete along with the yeast.   either way, same thing.  id rather not pay for hop sacks I dont need.  But thats just me.  

 

#Hopsgocommando #RIPSLYM

 

Bottom line, to answer your original question, is honestly, if you dont know when to add hops then dont use them.  do some research first, jumping ahead leads to dumping beer. Thats just me being honest. 

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16 minutes ago, wagonblott said:

Yes, What's the sack for,

If you put the hops in the sack and tie a knot in it, you will have less hop sediment in your beer.

 

However, I personally don't think a sack is necessary unless you are adding more than an ounce of hops.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Bottom line, to answer your original question, is honestly, if you dont know when to add hops then dont use them.  do some research first, jumping ahead leads to dumping beer. Thats just me being honest. 

 

Dumping beer is bad for the environment. For proper beer disposal it should be sent to:

 

jsherman

321 Ale Blvd.

Boozeville, Beerlaska 63352

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Most hopping is done while steeping the wort for bitterness and or flavor profiling.

 

Different hops add or deter the flavor or IBU rating of the batch. To get aroma dry hopping is done by installing the hops at or during ferment time. 

 

Hopping adds stability to high ABV brews. We can steep  multi hops throughout the wort preparation or dry hop in intervals like week 1,2,3 .

 

Get it?

 

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14 minutes ago, MnMBeer said:

Most hopping is done while steeping the wort for bitterness and or flavor profiling.

 

Different hops add or deter the flavor or IBU rating of the batch. To get aroma dry hopping is done by installing the hops at or during ferment time. 

 

Hopping adds stability to high ABV brews. We can steep  multi hops throughout the wort preparation or dry hop in intervals like week 1,2,3 .

 

Get it?

 

 

You want to boil the hops in the wort, not steep. Hops isomerization doesn't occur till temps hit 190ish I believe.

 

Steeping is done at temps under 165.

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1 hour ago, jsherman said:

 

You want to boil the hops in the wort, not steep. Hops isomerization doesn't occur till temps hit 190ish I believe.

 

Steeping is done at temps under 165.

I was looking at a toppling Goliath pseudo sue clone and they use citra as part of the mash. Kind of had me wondering why, and if they do it why don't I start doing it?

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1 hour ago, MnMBeer said:

Most hopping is done while steeping the wort for bitterness and or flavor profiling.

 

Different hops add or deter the flavor or IBU rating of the batch. To get aroma dry hopping is done by installing the hops at or during ferment time. 

 

Hopping adds stability to high ABV brews. We can steep  multi hops throughout the wort preparation or dry hop in intervals like week 1,2,3 .

 

Get it?

 

If you just take the word steep and replace them all

with the word boil, then I'd agree. But I think you've Brewed more batches than me so who am I to say 

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4 hours ago, MnMBeer said:

Most hopping is done while steeping the wort for bitterness and or flavor profiling.

 

Different hops add or deter the flavor or IBU rating of the batch. To get aroma dry hopping is done by installing the hops at or during ferment time. 

 

Hopping adds stability to high ABV brews. We can steep  multi hops throughout the wort preparation or dry hop in intervals like week 1,2,3 .

 

Get it?

 

 

I think there are some misunderstandings or misstatements here. 

 

I kept my first post simple because I saw that the original question was the first post by the OP. What follows is probably more advanced than what the OP is looking for.

 

Hops are used for a few different reasons. If they're boiled, they can add bitterness, flavor and aroma in different amounts, depending on the compounds in the hops (the Alpha Acids, the Beta Acids and the Cohumulone) and the length of the boil (also the pH of the wort, mostly a result of the gravity of the wort; too high or too low of a gravity will lead to lower hop utilization). You can also add them at flameout (where they'll impart very little bitterness, but some flavor and more aroma). Or you can wait and add them after primary fermentation is complete to add aroma (dry hopping). The bitterness offsets the sweetness of the malt that is a result of unfermentable sugars.

 

Hops are also naturally anti-microbial. That's a big part of why they almost completely replaced other herbs, such as sweet gale, wormwood, yarrow, juniper, etc.That had been used to bitter beer. They still get used, but often in addition to the hops, or when somebody wants to brew a traditional gruit. IPAs weren't additionally brewed to be really bitter or full of hoppy aroma. They were brewed with lots of hops (and high ABV) in order to ensure they could be shipped from England to India and arrive unspoiled (the India part of that is where they got the name India Pale Ale--it originally referred to the intended destination).

 

I've never heard of adding hops during a steep, but I suppose it can be done. Some recipes call for steeping hops, but they generally mean steeping them in the hot wort at the end of the boil, not adding them to the steeping grains (maybe this is what MnMBeer was referring to). There's also something known as First Wort Hopping (FWH), which refers to adding hops to the wort during the sparging process, so they are there below boiling for a period of time before the boil starts. I've read that this will increase the IBUs by approximately 10%. However, despite the increase in IBUs, people report that beers brewed this way often taste smoother.

 

I'm not sure what is meant by the statement that hops add stability to high ABV brews. High ABV brews can have a lot more sweetness to them if they're brewed with a lot of malt, so more hops would be needed to offset that additional sweetness. Some high ABV brews use more simple sugar to reduce the amount of unfermented sugar (and keep the beer from being too thick). Brewed that way, we wouldn't need as many hops to offset the malt.

 

As long as this post is and as much as it includes, there's actually a lot more to it that that, but I'm trying to keep it fairly simple. If you want to learn more about hops I'd suggest doing some additional reading. There is a lot of information available on the web, and there are also some really good books available, including this one, written by a guy I worked with about 30 years ago.

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13 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I've added 6oz of hops commando without any issues (clogging of the spigot).  Of course I tilted and cold crashed the LBK in order to achieve this, but like jsherman said, it's a personal choice.

6 oz???? In one batch in an LBK??? What the heck are you brewing? "Kill you with hops IPA"? Give me one 

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1 hour ago, Creeps McLane said:

6 oz???? In one batch in an LBK??? What the heck are you brewing? "Kill you with hops IPA"? Give me one 

 

Aphid spray, I will have to try it on my roses.

 

I bag the hops and take out the bags before bottling. Even the bags if left in can get in the way of the spigot.

 

Talking of hops adds. I think in the next beer although I am not a general hophead I will make the Diablo again and add 0.5 oz each of Amarillo Simcoe and Citra. I figure that will grapefruit it fairly well.

 

Last time I added 1 oz Citra and that was real citrous aroma but more grapefruit is called for by my constituents. To get some taste spread before, and avoid gassing out the most volatile aromatics,  I added 0.5 oz at end of boil and 0.5 oz for last 7 days in LBK. Great aroma!

 

So I will mix all the hops and add in 2 batches as before.

 

I might just try this on American Ale without extra bittering too.

 

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3 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

6 oz???? In one batch in an LBK??? What the heck are you brewing? "Kill you with hops IPA"? Give me one 

Haha...  Nah it was for my Citrus IPA.  6oz of Citra + 4oz of grapefruit skins.  It certainly was not lacking in the citrus department. 

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On 1/30/2016 at 0:20 PM, Creeps McLane said:

I was looking at a toppling Goliath pseudo sue clone and they use citra as part of the mash. Kind of had me wondering why, and if they do it why don't I start doing it?

That is a technique known as First Wort Hopping. From what I've heard it is generally only done with all grain or partial mashing.

 

With extract brewing I suppose you could do FWH with steeping grains.

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16 minutes ago, jsherman said:

That is a technique known as First Wort Hopping. From what I've heard it is generally only done with all grain or partial mashing.

 

With extract brewing I suppose you could do FWH with steeping grains.

Interesting, I wonder what is gained from first wort hopping? Maybe an extra boost of bitterness? Seems like I should do a little research on this...

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40 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Interesting, I wonder what is gained from first wort hopping? Maybe an extra boost of bitterness? Seems like I should do a little research on this...

 

First wort hopping increases IBUs by about 10%. But it's supposed to be smoother. Maybe like the way bitterness from a low AA% hop is smoother. 

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Back to keeping it simple for the original poster -- I believe most Mr. Beer recipes that use extra hops call for adding them at flameout.  In other words, bring your four cups of water to a boil, then add the hops (in a tied hop sack, or not) to the water. Turn off the flame, then add your Mr. Beer can of HME and any LME softpacks you are using, and continue with the standard Mr. Beer directions.

 

Try it that way first, then if you decide you want more bittering or flavor or aroma, you can look into different boil times or dry hopping.

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