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Safbrew S-33

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I love the smell of beer in the morning...smells like...well...you know...beer! :)

So I brewed up some batches yesterday and wanted to try a Wit-like beer with the S-33. Anybody using this one?

I'd been reading a lot about it's flavor profile and fermenting habits. It's supposed to lend some ester flavors, but not as much as true Belgian varieties. I read that it seems to go like crazy and then sort of lose steam, depending on temperature. 

I wanted to let it go at a cool room temperature so it could stay in the middle to upper end of it's comfort zone and get some of the promised spice from the yeast. I intentionally pitched a little warm at 72 degrees to give it the best chance of really getting the job done if it's going to peter out. I pitched 2/3 packet in the standard LBK amount of wort.

The other third I used for a smaller batch in a small batch using leftover ingredients and a few grams of hops saved back from the other brews I was working on. I put that in a gallon sun-tea jug to use as a monitor and experiment with early bottling. I let all the batches (3 LBKs and the gallon jug) sit on a bench in the shop that held about 70 degrees ambient yesterday and 68 overnight. I covered everything with a towel to keep things cozy. 

I walked in the shop this morning and was greeted by that happy aroma. I checked on the kegs and the gallon jug and found that the S-33 keg was hitting low 70's temp wise and the others (S-04 and US-05) were maintaining at high 60's. Because I'm checking temp with an infra-red thermometer against the outside of the keg, I expect internal temps to be a little higher, though not by much. All were krausening just fine, but the S-33 was winning the race by a head (that's a pun and a really good one...). The foam was thick and heavy, but not high enough to come near the lid. I uncovered the jug to check it (it's clear so it's easy to  see what's happening) and, holy cow!...It looks like Alka Seltzer in there! 

I put the kegs in my brewing cabinet to maintain slightly lower temps over the next few days and I put the jug in a dark corner in my spray booth that should let it stay right in the 70 degree range. I'm really excited to see what this stuff will do. I like the idea of a wheat beer with a little European character, but not as much of the banana flavor in the profile. I used some Hallertau Blanc and Crystal hops. Crystal is an aromatic Hallertau/Cascade cross that should lend a little American character and the Hallertau Blanc is supposed to have some light spice and white wine/fruit flavors. 

 

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S-33 is one of the lower attenuating yeasts you can get. It will leave you with a higher FG than most other yeasts, which makes this great for beers where you want some residual sweetness (great for ciders, too). It is a bit bready, however. It works great in American style wheats and German witbiers, especially since it doesn't flocculate very well and will leave your beer cloudy. In a wheat beer, this isn't an issue since they're naturally cloudy anyway. So if you're not doing a wheat beer, cold-crashing is highly recommended. 

 

A lot of people are turned off by this yeast. If you go to any forum where this yeast is being discussed, you will find many people just don't like it. But that's only because they aren't using it for the right styles. Ignore what the manufacturer says about it being great for Belgian and Trappist style ales. That's hogwash. For those, use the T-58, or a liquid yeast that's suitable for those styles. I've tried S-33 in Trappist style ales and it just doesn't work as well as the estery T-58. But it does work great in wheats, ciders, and some British ales, especially Southern English browns, milds, and some porters/stouts where you want some residual sweetness without having to use lactose or supplemental crystal malts.

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4 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

I've tried S-33 in Trappist style ales and it just doesn't work as well as the estery T-58. But it does work great in wheats, ciders, and some British ales, especially Southern English browns, milds, and some porters/stouts.

That's exactly the impression I've been getting from researching it. Since I'm hoping for a more American wheat with just a hint of the esters, it might be really good for that. The other beers you mentioned are right up my alley, too, so I may be on the right track. I started an English Mild/Brown Ale yesterday with Safale S-04 and I'll see what happens there, as well...

I just realized the S-33 is Safbrew, not Safale...

Thanks Josh!

 

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PS...the low attenuation is something I looked at, too. I intentionally started with the OG as low as I could so that I'd get a lower-alcohol, relatively quick-conditioning beer with a little residual sweetness to go with the promised spice and fruit in the hops. ;)

And, looking at my notes, I realized that my Mild/Brown is using the US-05 and the English Bitter I started(on the border between Ordinary and Best) is using the S-04.

 

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UGH....I just used this yeast on two batches and can confirm that my beer is crazy cloudy!!

 

I grabbed some because I could have sworn I read that this was similar to the Mr Beer Yeast.  Boy I was wrong!

 

Will cold crashing really clear this up?   Both kegs have been sitting for almost 5 weeks now and only the top 1 inch

of my beer is clear. The Krausen is still floating at the top.  Should I just let it sit longer or crash it?

 

BTW...I attempted to leave one keg in the fridge over night and this did absolutely nothing.  I tasted the beer from one keg

and its actually very good and does have a slight sweet malty taste to it.

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On ‎2‎/‎18‎/‎2016 at 11:56 AM, RickBeer said:

You need to bottle this NOW!  5 weeks is pushing it to have off-flavors.  This yeast isn't going to clear up no matter how long you let it sit as Josh stated above.

 

Cold crashing doesn't happen over night.  3 days.

 

Bottled them all last night 14 32 ounce flip tops.....

 

The beer is cloudy, but it smells sooo freekin good.

 

Tasted the flat brew and I think I have two style winners!...Thanks for the heads up Rick Beer!

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