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Creeps McLane

Slim Dorilldo IPA

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Slim Dorilldo IPA

 

Recipe   Slim Dorilldo IPA   Style   American IPA
Brewer       Batch   4.25 gal
All Grain

 

Recipe Characteristics

Recipe Gravity   1.075 OG   Estimated FG   1.019 FG
Recipe Bitterness   90 IBU   Alcohol by Volume   7.3%
Recipe Color   11° SRM   Alcohol by Weight   5.7%

 

Ingredients

Quantity   Grain   Type   Use
10.00 lb   Pale Ale Malt - [Rich, Malt, Biscuit, Nutty]   Grain   Mashed
1.00 lb   Crystal 40L - [Body, Caramel, Head, Sweet]   Grain   Mashed
1.00 lb   CaraPils - [Body, Head]   Grain   Mashed
Quantity   Hop   Type   Time
1.00 oz   Simcoe - Bittering woodsy pine, mahogany/walnut wood aroma, with some resinous/candy-like and citrus character.   Pellet   60 minutes
1.00 oz   El Dorado   Pellet   35 minutes
1.00 oz   Amarillo - Floral, tropical, and citrus. Excellent flavor/aroma hop for American ales   Pellet   5 minutes
1.00 oz   Amarillo - Floral, tropical, and citrus. Excellent flavor/aroma hop for American ales   Pellet   0 minutes
Quantity   Misc   Notes
0.50 unit   WhirlFloc   Fining   1/2 Tablet per 5 gallons 15 minutes before flameout
1.00 unit   Safale S-05 Dry Ale Yeast   Yeast   American: Temperature Range: 59°-75° F 11.5 GRAMS

 

Recipe Notes

 

Batch Notes

 

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That's a nice, straight-forward grain bill for an IPA. Amarillo is my favorite flavor/aroma hop- one of my standard recipes is an oatmeal IPA that features Amarillo with a similar grain bill to this one, just swapping in instant oats for the carapils.

 

I'd go in a different direction with the rest of your hop schedule - Simcoe is wasted IMO as a pure bittering addition. Why not use something cheaper like Magnum to bitter, and get some flavor from Simcoe as a later addition. I also don't get the El Dorado at 35m .... you're halfway between peak flavoring and peak bittering. I'd just move that one later in the boil as well.

 

Just some thoughts - I'm sure it'll turn out great.

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1 hour ago, 209Hill said:

That's a nice, straight-forward grain bill for an IPA. Amarillo is my favorite flavor/aroma hop- one of my standard recipes is an oatmeal IPA that features Amarillo with a similar grain bill to this one, just swapping in instant oats for the carapils.

 

I'd go in a different direction with the rest of your hop schedule - Simcoe is wasted IMO as a pure bittering addition. Why not use something cheaper like Magnum to bitter, and get some flavor from Simcoe as a later addition. I also don't get the El Dorado at 35m .... you're halfway between peak flavoring and peak bittering. I'd just move that one later in the boil as well.

 

Just some thoughts - I'm sure it'll turn out great.

 

Yeah, Simcoe has a very low co-humulone content and you would have to use more than 1 oz to get good bittering regardless of the IBUs. So while it may be great for bittering a pale ale or a single hop Simcoe IPA, the greatest benefits of Simcoe will be lost in the boil. That "Bittering woodsy pine, etc" description? GONE in 60 minutes. I think the El Dorado makes a great bittering hop. It's dual-purpose, and with its high AA% and moderate co-humulone % it's a much better bittering hop for an IPA than Simcoe. It's also a great flavor/aroma hop, too.

 

I also agree with moving the Amarillo to later in the boil. 20 minutes is the sweet spot for flavor and aroma. Try alternating the Amarillo and the Simcoe every 5 minutes. But however you brew it, it's going to be a good beer. You can't go wrong with Amarillo and Simcoe. Nice grain bill, too.

 

Here's a tip: add about 1/2 lb of dextrose (per 5 gallon batch) to the wort. This will slightly dry the beer, bringing the hop profile forward. I do this in all of my IPAs. It's a tip I learned from Vinnie Cilurzo, the Brewmaster at Russian River Brewing Company and creator of Pliny the Elder.

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