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Bhob

Does Beer need to breathe?

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I opened my first bottle of Chewbeerca last night and honestly it was overwhelming. I am not a hoppy or full bodied beer guy I admit. But this was way "flavorful". However, I had it in a 1L bottle and only drank half last night. That was pretty much all I could manage.

 

BUT, I just had the remainder with dinner ( 1 day later) and it is WAY smoother and mellower. I am liking it now. This is sort of like letting wine breathe, it is MUCH better after letting it sit overnight with more air in the bottle.

 

Am I crazy?

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Yeah I find similar.  But with 1 L bottle especially,  if not drunk all at once, will pour differently over time and you can't get the same pour every time as Rick says the carbonation will decrease every time.  For me that means that either the first pour is over carbonated, or the last pour is under carbonated. So I cannot be as accurate with carbonation as with 12 oz bottles for style. So typically, I have a little more carb than less in there.

 

Not that it is bad, one gets effectively 2 different beers from one bottle - lol. Sometimes for strong beers, 3 or 4. Good value.

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

You overcarbonated for the style, day later showed you that.

 

I have started trying to do batch priming, it does use a lot less sugar it seems. First batch is due in to weeks, so I'll see how it goes. Hope I don't end up with a lot of flat beer.

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Actually, it takes the exact same amount of sugar, IF you use the same calculator you used for batch priming to calculate bottle priming.  Simple math, divides by the number of X ounce bottles.

 

Mr. Beer knows that most people couldn't handle batch priming at first, so they provide a chart with reasonable carbonation levels (was all in tsp of sugar years ago).  Then they added carb drops to make it easier, and tweaked the chart to roughly line up.  The reality is no one can tell the difference between 4 grams and 4.1 grams or 4.2 grams in a bottle.  Also, no new brewer can figure out max temp hit and adjust for that.

 

A good rule of thumb is to use 65 - 75% of Mr. Beer's levels.  Or use Screwy's calculator.

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