Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Grifoni24

Adding Hops at different times

Recommended Posts

Quick question regarding adding hops at different stages.  I have tried a couple different recipes on adding hops after boiling the water and also a week after fermenting.

 

So, as i eventually move to creating my own type recipes, I was curious what do the two styles add/differ to the taste?  

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys!  I have glanced at all the sites and forums, but will certainly read deeper into this.  I am still a newbie only brewed like 12 batches now, but start mixing hops into some of the blends to get flavors that remind me of europe before i leave.

 

I am currently experimenting with the Wiesbier now.  Started with the normal recipe nothing added.  Now making the wild wheat to see how that compares.  I am also waiting on the Wild Wheat with Hollentrau hops to compare the tastes.  Both were brewed at flameout.  After I find a good wiesbeir replica, I am moving on to the Belgians because not being able to drive there and pick up the Trappist beers will be hard for me.  Now, i now I wont be able to make make exacts, just looking for something the mimics (reminds) of a Belgian blonde, brun, and quad.

 

Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps you want to spend more time reviewing the links given.  You will see a chart in the post I linked to.  Note the terms - Bitterness, Flavor, and Aroma.  The additions you have done, at flameout and at 1 week, do not impact flavor except that aroma impacts your tastes.  You need to do hop boils to impact flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Grifoni24 said:

Thanks guys!  I have glanced at all the sites and forums, but will certainly read deeper into this.  I am still a newbie only brewed like 12 batches now, but start mixing hops into some of the blends to get flavors that remind me of europe before i leave.

 

I am currently experimenting with the Wiesbier now.  Started with the normal recipe nothing added.  Now making the wild wheat to see how that compares.  I am also waiting on the Wild Wheat with Hollentrau hops to compare the tastes.  Both were brewed at flameout.  After I find a good wiesbeir replica, I am moving on to the Belgians because not being able to drive there and pick up the Trappist beers will be hard for me.  Now, i now I wont be able to make make exacts, just looking for something the mimics (reminds) of a Belgian blonde, brun, and quad.

 

Thanks again!

 

Grifoni - I am in the same position you are. Trying to learn hops, how to use them, and how different things impact each other.

 

The links RB and AC posted are very helpful. Read them. Also take a look at the recipe section and see different ways hops are used, what hops are used etc.

 

Be a bit careful looking at "other" sites recipes where you see things like 1 hour boils, etc. Those recipes do not have Hopped Malt Extract. You are doing the bittering in those recipes. Mr. Beer extracts are already hopped and bittered. You are using hops to impact flavor and aroma (like RB said.)

 

One thing I am doing is getting a "base" beer. For me that is going to be CAL (Classic American Light) plus Booster. From there I am going to add different hops, LMEs, steeping grains, etc. to see how things impact each other.

 

The other day was my first intentional experiment. (Not mad scientist! I was doing things thoughtfully!)

 

I used a combo of Centennial and Cascade hops with the idea of having more hop flavor than my other brews have had so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Grifoni24 said:

I am moving on to the Belgians because not being able to drive there and pick up the Trappist beers will be hard for me.  Now, i now I wont be able to make make exacts, just looking for something the mimics (reminds) of a Belgian blonde, brun, and quad.

 

Thanks again!

 

RE Belgians - These will be a product of malt and yeast (T-58), a bit of spice, not hops. Belgians are very simple in the hop profile. Literally you could probably get by with just Saaz at flameout for a Belgium.

 

Look at the Gigantor Quad in the archives. That is the Mr. Beer quad. I brewed it, it is still fermenting. But it takes six months conditioning!!! I'll let you know in November how it turns out.....(insert sad face.)

 

The Abbey Dubbel (current recipe section) is the the Mr. Beer Dubbel. Very good reviews. After this brewing "season" it is one of the first things I am brewing when I get back up and running again.

 

The Ambrosia Tripel....the Mr. B Tripel.

 

You'll notice they are all kind of expensive. Because you need a lot of malt for a good Belgian. They also all use T-58.

 

The "the Belgian" is going to come from the malt and the yeast and not fermenting at too low temps, and then longer conditioning times.

 

I have a beer conditioning right now, a Mad American. I used American Ale, who knows what else, and T-58. It fermented a bit warm and it tastes like a young Amber Tripel. It is almost really good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Grifoni24 said:

Thanks guys!  I have glanced at all the sites and forums, but will certainly read deeper into this.  I am still a newbie only brewed like 12 batches now, but start mixing hops into some of the blends to get flavors that remind me of europe before i leave.

 

I am currently experimenting with the Wiesbier now.  Started with the normal recipe nothing added.  Now making the wild wheat to see how that compares.  I am also waiting on the Wild Wheat with Hollentrau hops to compare the tastes.  Both were brewed at flameout.  After I find a good wiesbeir replica, I am moving on to the Belgians because not being able to drive there and pick up the Trappist beers will be hard for me.  Now, i now I wont be able to make make exacts, just looking for something the mimics (reminds) of a Belgian blonde, brun, and quad.

 

Thanks again!

i'm about to do another wild wheat this week, last time I added 2oz of honey malt, and it was really good, just thought it had taken some of the natural wheat flavor away with the honey taste. so i'll do again with 1 oz. honey malt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Perhaps you want to spend more time reviewing the links given.  You will see a chart in the post I linked to.  Note the terms - Bitterness, Flavor, and Aroma.  The additions you have done, at flameout and at 1 week, do not impact flavor except that aroma impacts your tastes.  You need to do hop boils to impact flavor.

Yeah, i saw the chart and had not gone into the deep research of it yet.  More of out loud brainstorming at this point.  Once the kiddos go to sleep I can dig deep into this and thanks again for all the assistance on this.  

 

Also, thanks for the notes on the Quad recipe....I have not tried the Dubbel, Triple, or Quads, but I will give them a try soon.  

 

Thanks!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eventually you will want to start creating your own recipes with LME, DME and grains. In effect you are acting like a chef. What will the grain bill bring? What will the hops bring? What will the yeast bring? Each part of the equation should coalesce into a final product that is good to drink. 

 

Regarding the hops, that is where you need to research the profiles to match the style beer you are creating. Higher alpha acids hops use for bittering, lower alpha acid hops with higher co-humolone use for flavor and aroma. Longer the boil the more bitterness but less flavor and aroma. Shorter the boil the more flavor and aroma but less bitterness. 

 

Once you get used to what each part of the finished beer brings you can start tweaking the recipe to make it better. I swear half the fun of home brewing is researching and creating recipes. The reward is drinking and sharing the finished product. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@sabres032 - This is where the lag between brewing and conditioning just kills me. I just finished my "base" yesterday. CAL and Booster. Well...and a Golden LME because i had it.


For the hops - 20 minutes total - 20 minutes of an ounce of centennial and half cascade and 10 minutes with half and ounce of cascade.

 

But I won't know how it turned out for another six....seven weeks....AAARRGGGGG.

 

For the next Base Variation I want to try a basic CAL, Booster, Saaz and steeping grains.

 

But again...six....seven weeks....AAAARRGGGGG.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

@sabres032 - This is where the lag between brewing and conditioning just kills me. I just finished my "base" yesterday. CAL and Booster. Well...and a Golden LME because i had it.


For the hops - 20 minutes total - 20 minutes of an ounce of centennial and half cascade and 10 minutes with half and ounce of cascade.

 

But I won't know how it turned out for another six....seven weeks....AAARRGGGGG.

 

For the next Base Variation I want to try a basic CAL, Booster, Saaz and steeping grains.

 

But again...six....seven weeks....AAAARRGGGGG.

 

Yea, the wait sucks but it's worth it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This chart from Jim is why I asked the question. I can't see how a hop can do much of anything at flameout or especially dry hopping if this is the real deal.

 

That being said, I know I do get contribution to the final product from hops added at flameout, and I have dry hopped as well. I guess I was just wondering what the intent is. Since most of these extracts are HME's, the hop additions are doing something but are not the prime mover. Recently I have started using this hop schedule with DME and LME starters and getting some really good results. So, that's what got me thinking about this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are no absolutes in brewing.  A chart is a chart.  Also, remember that your senses are affected by each other.  Blind people usually have increased hearing sensitivity.  And taste is impacted by AROMA as well as FLAVOR.  

 

Lastly, remember that many people lack the refined tastes to notice things that expert tasters notice.  "A fine aroma of ____" is often not noticed by someone unless they are told to look for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saying that dry-hopping only gives aroma and no flavor is like saying that you can smell peeling an orange, but you can't taste the orange when you bite into it. Dry hopping leaves behind oils and terpenes that are otherwise burned off during the hop boil. These oils and terpenes contribute just as much flavor as they do aroma. Yes, you will taste the hops, for sure. A 5-20 minute boil would infuse these flavors into the beer even more than if just dry-hopping, but after 20+ minutes of heat contact, these volatile oils and terpenes burn off, leaving behind the acids that cause bitterness. While dry-hopping is primarily for aroma - because the terpenes and oils are completely intact since they had no contact with heat - don't be fooled into thinking those oils and terpenes have no flavor, too. Of course, it also depends on other variables such as hop strain, gravity, malts, dry-hopping time, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×