Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Creeps McLane

Gluten free beer???

Recommended Posts

I'm no expert but my brew buddy want to brew a gluten free beer for his mother. We'd do a ten gallon batch, low ABV is the goal. He sent me the ingredients and I had some concerns with the amount of adjuncts. Looking for any input. Basic outline looks something like this: 6 lbs of sorghum extract, 6 lbs of flaked rice and 3 lbs of honey. 

 

I was thinking more sorghum and less rice because I'm not sure if the rice has the proper enzymes to convert sugars and if the sorghum would have enough to assist. The honey scares me too because I don't want the beer to be too dry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both the rice and the sorghum have 0 diastatic power (0 enzymes). The solution to this is amylase enzyme, which you can purchase at your LHBS. This will take the place of the enzymes in barley malt. (Amylase enzyme preparations come from fungi and do not contain gluten.). Add about 2 tsp for a 10 gallon batch. You generally want to AVOID getting too much starch into solution, so you want to steep the rice below gelatinization temperature.  Since most gluten-free grains have a gelatinization temperature that is higher than usual mash temps, steeping at 155 F is usually safe; just, whatever you do, do NOT boil them!  If you steep too hot, you will get an excess of starch in your beer that will make it impossible to clear (no matter how much finings you add or how many times you rack and cold-crash).  You may even get a starchy flavor that will not be pleasant.

 

So bring your water to 155, dissolve the amylase enzyme in the water, add the rice and steep for 30 mins, remove the rice, and hold the temperature at 155 for about 15-20 minutes (This is called a "saccharification rest" or "starch conversion rest"). During this time, the amylase will continue to convert starches to fermentable sugars. After the rest, bring the wort up to boiling and brew as normal. You may also need to consider using rice hulls in the mash since the flaked rice has had its hulls removed. This will cause the rice to gum up preventing proper surface area and water flow. You can get flaked rice at your LHBS for ridiculously cheap (It's about $1 per lb and you will only need about 1/2 lb). 

 

You can use iodine (or iodophor) to check a sample of the wort to see whether the starches have been completely converted to sugars. Iodine causes starch to turn black. The amylase enzyme should convert all of the starches, resulting in no color change when a couple drops of iodine are added to a sample of the wort (The wort sample should not have any grain particles in it.). The iodine will only add a slight tan or reddish color as opposed to the flash of heavy black color if starch is present. Worts that are high in dextrins will yield a strong reddish color when iodine is added.

 

I'd also cut back on the honey to 2 lbs. This will keep the ABV low without making it too dry. Also, consider using a low attenuating yeast, such as S-33.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I noticed in my searches that Brewers best makes a gluten free kit. (Yes I realize this is a mr beer forum) it includes breiss white sorghum extract and some maltodextrin. Kit has orange peels and what not in it. I'd be more interested in trying to convert that to a pale ale. I'm wondering if they already have enzymes added to the extract. Nice thing is their website lists exactly what's in the can so I should be able to find out easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

The extract doesn't have enzymes, but you don't need them unless you plan on mashing a non-diastatic grain.

I see, That is very interesting.  Why mess with the rice when I can just use straight up Extract.  I switched this project from my buddys mom being the priority to my wifes three friends who are gluten intolerant. Im thinking Throw some citra for bittering, and maybe something as obvious as cascade for flavor and aroma for a nice little pale ale.  Or maybe some columbus, which is my favorite hop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

well it's happening, how long are you planning to ferment? looks like this one might take the whole 3 weeks

Yeah, no doubt its fermenting. Im just used to week one being pretty crazy in the old air lock. Im happy i got myself a refractometer the other day. Ill make sure my gravity makes sense before i do anything

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Jim Johnson said:

can't really trust a refractometer when alcohol is present. I only use mine for pre boil gravity and OG. I just float my hydrometer in the bucket, screw a sample.

Shoot i forgot about that... Thats a good idea though chucking a the hydrometer in the bucket. Like that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2016 at 12:14 PM, MRB Josh R said:

Both the rice and the sorghum have 0 diastatic power (0 enzymes). The solution to this is amylase enzyme, which you can purchase at your LHBS. This will take the place of the enzymes in barley malt. (Amylase enzyme preparations come from fungi and do not contain gluten.). Add about 2 tsp for a 10 gallon batch. You generally want to AVOID getting too much starch into solution, so you want to steep the rice below gelatinization temperature.  Since most gluten-free grains have a gelatinization temperature that is higher than usual mash temps, steeping at 155 F is usually safe; just, whatever you do, do NOT boil them!  If you steep too hot, you will get an excess of starch in your beer that will make it impossible to clear (no matter how much finings you add or how many times you rack and cold-crash).  You may even get a starchy flavor that will not be pleasant.

 

So bring your water to 155, dissolve the amylase enzyme in the water, add the rice and steep for 30 mins, remove the rice, and hold the temperature at 155 for about 15-20 minutes (This is called a "saccharification rest" or "starch conversion rest"). During this time, the amylase will continue to convert starches to fermentable sugars. After the rest, bring the wort up to boiling and brew as normal. You may also need to consider using rice hulls in the mash since the flaked rice has had its hulls removed. This will cause the rice to gum up preventing proper surface area and water flow. You can get flaked rice at your LHBS for ridiculously cheap (It's about $1 per lb and you will only need about 1/2 lb). 

 

You can use iodine (or iodophor) to check a sample of the wort to see whether the starches have been completely converted to sugars. Iodine causes starch to turn black. The amylase enzyme should convert all of the starches, resulting in no color change when a couple drops of iodine are added to a sample of the wort (The wort sample should not have any grain particles in it.). The iodine will only add a slight tan or reddish color as opposed to the flash of heavy black color if starch is present. Worts that are high in dextrins will yield a strong reddish color when iodine is added.

 

I'd also cut back on the honey to 2 lbs. This will keep the ABV low without making it too dry. Also, consider using a low attenuating yeast, such as S-33.

Had to go back and read this. I’m making a partial mash gluten free beer however I need to mash 3 lbs of flaked corn. So I’ll be running to the LHBS today to pick up some enzymes 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made one of these Gluten Free Beers awhile back for a guy at work that has that issue. It was a basically a 1G Belgian Pale ale recipe from CraftaBrew using sorghum and the amber candi sugar instead of the malt extract. Turned out pretty well, according to him and his brother.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, TonyKZ1 said:

I made one of these Gluten Free Beers awhile back for a guy at work that has that issue. It was a basically a 1G Belgian Pale ale recipe from CraftaBrew using sorghum and the amber candi sugar instead of the malt extract. Turned out pretty well, according to him and his brother.

That’s exactly what I did myself last time. I thought it was great. That was a pale ale though, this is gonna be a lager... we’ll see what comes through. This is where I’m sitting so far. I have to work out my late hop addition and I have to add lime zest to the database

E4529EA3-54A6-44FB-8D25-12EBFDF4DBCD.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×