AnthonyC

Rhisomes

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I saw on one of the home brewing websites that they have hop rhisomes on sale for $1.00 each.  It says that they should be planted in early spring and we're in early summer.  Do you think this would work here in the northeast?  I don't even care if they flop this year, but grow long and proud next year.  Any input??

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That's just like the time I purchased liquid yeast past their date for $1.00 per pack at my LHBS. It's a roll of the dice. In my case, 2 out of the 5 packets were still good, so it still paid off (considering that they were $7.95 ea. normally). If you get some now and plant them, even if they are all a bust, how much would you be out? $5.00 to $10.00? You  could buy some and plant them in potting containers and grow them inside in a controlled environment till next spring when you would be ready to plant. Just my $0.02. 

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4 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

They would Iikely die from the heat. 

1 side of my house has limited sunshine only in the A.M. (east).  I may give it try.  I also like the idea of starting it in an indoor planter.  Have you ever done this before, Rick?  

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I wanted to grow hops, then i watched don osborn on youtube harvest his hops and realized the work put in for it. After it was all said and donenhe had only about 5 oz. all that work for 5 oz? I mean, those arent pellets hes harvesting. takes more whole leaf hops per recipe than pellets right? This lazy man say "not worth it"

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The most amount of work that I'll be putting into it is buying soil, digging holes, plant, and water.  That method seems to work best for me.  Whenever I just toss some seeds around my plants grow like red woods.  Whenever I put the extra oomph into growing things, they wither and die.  Ex: orchids and my little dog Mr. Fluffles.

 

**Disclaimer--Mr. Fluffles did not actually exist**

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33 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

I wanted to grow hops, then i watched don osborn on youtube harvest his hops and realized the work put in for it. After it was all said and donenhe had only about 5 oz. all that work for 5 oz? I mean, those arent pellets hes harvesting. takes more whole leaf hops per recipe than pellets right? This lazy man say "not worth it"

I see your point, but for a buck per rhisome...  wtf.  Know what I mean??

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22 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

I see your point, but for a buck per rhisome...  wtf.  Know what I mean??

Truly not trying to be a downer but...

setting up a spot for them to climb

planting

harvesting

harvesting... Seems like a pain so i say it twice

drying

packaging

 

i would like to change my last post but ill just say i was wrong here instead. 5 lbs, had to have been 5 lbs he harvested. Still though for example columbus is $18 per lb, id rather pay $90 than put that much work in. But again i have never grown anything and when youre sitting by the computer late at night after a few home brews and it only takes a click of a button to buy something $90 seems more reasonable. 

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2 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

1 side of my house has limited sunshine only in the A.M. (east).  I may give it try.  I also like the idea of starting it in an indoor planter.  Have you ever done this before, Rick?  

No, but spring allows growth and root establishment before summer heat.

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12 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

No, but spring allows growth and root establishment before summer heat.

Gotcha.  Thank you. :)

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Hops need LOTS of sun. Plant them in the sunniest spot you can find. If you think they'll struggle this summer, plant them in a pot and transplant next year. 

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6 hours ago, bpgreen said:

Hops need LOTS of sun. Plant them in the sunniest spot you can find. If you think they'll struggle this summer, plant them in a pot and transplant next year. 

I think that is what I am going to do.  I'm not looking to buy a lot of them, just enough to get my feet wet.  I don't think the fiancée will protest if it's only 4 or 5 of them.  Thanks for the help. :)

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They do get really BIG though - and like to climb. I think there are some short varieties but I am not sure how the taste in beer is  though.

e.g. varieties Summit, Golden Tassels and Prima Donna

AND this  site that also has info on growing and references to low trellis cultivation.

http://www.adha.us/varietals/azacca-adha-483

 

For those interested on how it is done commercially, this might be an interesting read. It also tells you how to train tall varieties to  a low habit.

http://www.adha.us/sites/default/files/downloads/Oregon Hop Report on Low Trellis.pdf

 

 

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3 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

I think that is what I am going to do.  I'm not looking to buy a lot of them, just enough to get my feet wet.  I don't think the fiancée will protest if it's only 4 or 5 of them.  Thanks for the help. :)

I think it's an interesting venture and would do it just for the experience, regardless of how robust the yield ends up. How cool would it be to have homegrown hops in your homebrew? Hell, I'd sow some barley if I could! :lol:

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Sometimes it's not about saving money. That's not the reason most of us brew. I'm in my third year of growing them. I have Centennial and Cascade. Last year I got a couple pounds of each. This year I'm going to try to make a wet hopped IPA. Harvesting them isn't bad. Pruning scissors and a 5 gallon bucket make it relatively easy.

 

@AnthonyC, I'd say go for it. I do like the suggestion of getting the, started inside and then moving them out. Good luck!

image.jpeg

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24 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Note that hops are poisonous to dogs if you do grow them.

Excellent to know.  Thank you, Rick.  I do have 3 miniature dachshunds who love to get into everything.

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I planted 5 different rhizommes 2 years ago, only 2 survived and were mt. hood. this year one died and I have the other still climbing the fence. however, if u do decide look up a chart for the best hop to grow in your area. mt. hood likes very hot weather w/o a ton of water. that's probably the reason it survived. the centennial, chinook, williamette all died out the first year

On ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2016 at 7:00 PM, AnthonyC said:

I saw on one of the home brewing websites that they have hop rhisomes on sale for $1.00 each.  It says that they should be planted in early spring and we're in early summer.  Do you think this would work here in the northeast?  I don't even care if they flop this year, but grow long and proud next year.  Any input??

 

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On ‎7‎/‎9‎/‎2016 at 10:20 AM, efdbrian said:

Sometimes it's not about saving money. That's not the reason most of us brew. I'm in my third year of growing them. I have Centennial and Cascade. Last year I got a couple pounds of each. This year I'm going to try to make a wet hopped IPA. Harvesting them isn't bad. Pruning scissors and a 5 gallon bucket make it relatively easy.

 

@AnthonyC, I'd say go for it. I do like the suggestion of getting the, started inside and then moving them out. Good luck!

image.jpeg

I think this is a nicer way to train hops for the home than the one I posted.

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On 7/9/2016 at 11:38 AM, AnthonyC said:

Excellent to know.  Thank you, Rick.  I do have 3 miniature dachshunds who love to get into everything.

Dogs will generally ignore hops on the bine. They're really only a danger when they're in with something that will interest them, like malt.

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On 7/9/2016 at 10:20 AM, efdbrian said:

Sometimes it's not about saving money. That's not the reason most of us brew. I'm in my third year of growing them. I have Centennial and Cascade. Last year I got a couple pounds of each. This year I'm going to try to make a wet hopped IPA. Harvesting them isn't bad. Pruning scissors and a 5 gallon bucket make it relatively easy.

 

@AnthonyC, I'd say go for it. I do like the suggestion of getting the, started inside and then moving them out. Good luck!

image.jpeg

I just went back to this post and took a good look at this picture.  Man, that is awesome!   :)

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9 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

I planted 5 different rhizommes 2 years ago, only 2 survived and were mt. hood. this year one died and I have the other still climbing the fence. however, if u do decide look up a chart for the best hop to grow in your area. mt. hood likes very hot weather w/o a ton of water. that's probably the reason it survived. the centennial, chinook, williamette all died out the first year

 

I'm in NY, so we get weather extremes.  It can be 20° in the winter and 95° in the summer.  That is some good advice though, Hops.

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19 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

I'm in NY, so we get weather extremes.  It can be 20° in the winter and 95° in the summer.  That is some good advice though, Hops.

People grow fig plants in NY even (by burying them) so Hops should be OK if you just much them up really high.

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