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MRB Josh R

NEW RECIPE - Calavera Spiced Chile Stout!!

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cala.jpg

 

This is one of my new favorite recipes. Inspired by amazing beers like Stone's Xocoveza and Ska Brewing's Autumnal Mole Stout, this spiced chili stout is rich and smooth. It has an English stout base, but with a Latin kick. I highly recommend using Poblano or dry Ancho chilies, but any chili or hot pepper will do.

 

Get yours HERE!

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I'm not really sure if a chili beer would be my thing, but I'm down to try it 1x.  I'd rather try one before brewing some.  Anyone know of a brand that I could try??

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23 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

I'm not really sure if a chili beer would be my thing, but I'm down to try it 1x.  I'd rather try one before brewing some.  Anyone know of a brand that I could try??

 

I mentioned 2 in the first post.

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16 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

 

Wee-woo-wee-wooo!  GRAMMAR POLICE.... ? ??

PAST NOT PASSED, SIR!!  

Or passed (out of) as in achieved passing grade

Or passed (by) as in avoided

 

 

 

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22 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

This is one of my new favorite recipes. Inspired by amazing beers like Stone's Xocoveza and Ska Brewing's Autumnal Mole Stout, this spiced chili stout is rich and smooth. It has an English stout base, but with a Latin kick. I highly recommend using Poblano or dry Ancho chilies, but any chili or hot pepper will do.

 

Get yours HERE!

 

I have never tried this kind with chili although I do like stouts.

I did order one, and if I do not like it, I am sure my daughter or her friends will drink it. At least she likes the idea  :lol: 

I just worry about it being too spicy. A little gentle warmth for the cold weather is OK, but fiery, no way.

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Slight differences - @Mr B Josh - what do you think?

Stones is bourbon barrel aged - offering an additional idea for enhancements - bourbon soaked oak chips.

Ska's  uses 3 different varieties of chili peppers. I guess for their subtle flavoring differences.

 

Stone's Xocaveza

California- American Double/Imperial Stout- 10% ABV. BARREL AGED 3 months in American oak Kentucky Bourbon barrels. Milk stout brewed with cocoa, coffee and spices to mimic the rich flavors of Mexican hot chocolate. Barrel aging layers additional caramel-like and vanilla flavors.

(+ Something about can't ship to VA?)

 

Ska Brewing - Autumnal Mole Stout

Colorado- Specialty Beer- An ale brewed with cocoa nibs, spices and three different varieties of chile peppers. Inspiration comes from Ska's proximity to New Mexico and its cuisine, and the desire to make the perfect stout for pairing with enchiladas and mole poblano

 

There are a bunch of interesting Mole Stouts if you search on those 2 words.

How about this one - look at the ingredient - even more complexity. But it does note that getting all the flavors balanced was a challenge.:

http://www.summitdaily.com/explore-summit/events/must-be-the-mole-stout-makes-its-way-to-rio-grande-frisco/

 

 

I also note....Mr B has another Mole Stout based on St Pats.

http://www.mrbeer.com/ol-mol-stout-recipe

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I never said this was a clone of those beers. I said it was inspired by them. Also, The Ole Mole Stout is simply a St. Patrick's Irish Stout Standard Refill minus the Booster. It's also not partial mash. It will most likely be removed from the site since it's not an actual recipe.

 

Keep in mind that we also have more than 1 IPA, pale ale, Amber ale, wheat beer, etc.

 

Also, the Xocoveza is not bourbon barrel aged. It's 8.1% and is a milk stout, unlike the Calavera (though you could add some lactose if you wanted to). The Xocoveza Charred and the Xocovexza Anejo, however, are barrel-aged, but those are not the beers I was referring to.

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None of Mr. Beer's recipes are clones of commercial beers.  Why?

 

1) Because Josh would look silly in a black and white striped outfit.  Advertising "this is a clone of X beer" invites lawsuits.

 

2) Because even if the recipe for the commercial beer were widely known, Mr. Beer used specific hops to create their cans of HME.  Those hops, and when they are added, don't match (or even come close) to a specific commercial beer.  And, as we all know, even if you dry hop with the same hop that everyone knows is in that specific commercial beer, dry hopping isn't the same as adding hops for bitterness and flavor.

 

One of the things I've seen change since I started brewing in 2012 is that Josh has been removing the bogus recipes (take a can, add booster) from the site and putting on legitimate recipes (such as the partial mash recipes).  While I've not sampled them, it's pretty clear they would be heads above the old ones.  

 

For those wanting to clone a commercial beer, sometimes a simple Google search turns up the recipe.  If not, you can search for the recipe with the words "extract" and "clone" after the beer name.  I just brewed a clone of Bell's Two-Hearted.  While I can't use Bell's proprietary yeast, the recipes consisted of adding 4 ounces of Centennial hops (that's what Bell's says is in it), to 8+ pounds of pale LME and a pound of Crystal 10 steeped.  Some recipes had a different Crystal (one had 40), but that's as complex as the recipes get for that beer.

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59 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

I never said this was a clone of those beers. I said it was inspired by them. Also, The Ole Mole Stout is simply a St. Patrick's Irish Stout Standard Refill minus the Booster. It's also not partial mash. It will most likely be removed from the site since it's not an actual recipe.

 

Keep in mind that we also have more than 1 IPA, pale ale, Amber ale, wheat beer, etc.

 

Also, the Xocoveza is not bourbon barrel aged. It's 8.1% and is a milk stout, unlike the Calavera (though you could add some lactose if you wanted to). The Xocoveza Charred and the Xocovexza Anejo, however, are barrel-aged, but those are not the beers I was referring to.

 

Yeah, good info.

The Ska one I think has Lactose in too and a big variety of other stuff - from their web site below info.

I add these bits of info  just to show what can be added, not that you need to in necessity - or that you should clone them (but someone might want to - also so if they drink those - they can see what makes them different.

*Inspired by the Mexican and New Mexican cuisine of Ska’s Southern Colorado location, the Autumnal Molé Stout is brewed with cocoa nibs, spices and three varieties of chile peppers: Ancho, Guajillo and Hatch green chiles (also known as Anaheim peppers.)

The aroma is all about the peppers. The first drink really reveals the chocolate. Cinnamon, cumin, cloves and a subtle heat all add to the complexity, but in the end it's the residual sweetness that brings these diverse ingredients together and makes them play nice with your palate.

 

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But still I am worried I will have too much chili heat.

What I want is gentle subtle warming with a Mexican pepper flavor, not any kind of searing heat. Bear in mind this is not a chip and dip but a whole glass (or more) of the stuff.

How warming is it with the chili described?

 

Would hot sauce work and be easier to calibrate?  (e.g. sauce drops mixed into other beer to test heat?)

 

Another question, the recipe puts hops and cacao/pepper in separate hop sacks. Is this needed or can they all go in one sack.?They seem to get the same treatment in the brewing.

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Poblanos are very mild and won't add much heat at all. They only have 1000-2000 Scoville units of heat. Jalapenos, for comparison, have about 8000-10000 Scoville units of heat. Ancho peppers are simply dried Poblanos. Also, the heat will reduce as the beer ages. Alcohol neutralizes capsaicin over time. 

 

Most hot sauce has vinegar, which if not pasteurized can contaminate your beer. Not to mention the salt, preservatives, and other ingredients. I would NOT use hot sauce.

 

You can put them all in the same sack, but it's best to put them in separate sacks so they will have room to move around. If you fill the sack too tightly, it won't have enough contact time with the water and you will leave behind a lot of the good stuff. Having a couple of loose hop sacks is preferred to having one tightly packed one.

 

Brew the recipe as stated for best results.

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This really sounds interesting, especially after having had a Xocoveza last week. A few years back I roasted some serrano peppers to kick up some of the Cerveza. Good idea, bad execution. The heat was too "forward." This sounds like the heat would be an undercurrent.

Also, I had not thought about the physics of packing the hopsacks.  Every brewing experience is a learning experience.

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2 hours ago, Shrike said:

I picked up a Stone's Xocoveza to try tonight.  If I like it I'll give the Calavera recipe a try.

 

I'm drinking it now and really enjoying it.  So I've added the Calavera to my "to brew" list.

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On ‎11‎/‎2‎/‎2016 at 10:39 AM, Nickfixit said:

 

I have never tried this kind with chili although I do like stouts.

I did order one, and if I do not like it, I am sure my daughter or her friends will drink it. At least she likes the idea  :lol: 

I just worry about it being too spicy. A little gentle warmth for the cold weather is OK, but fiery, no way.

I bought some dried ancho chilis today, and put one in a beef chili I was making. (additional to standard seasonings). It was not overpowering so I am positive towards it.

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