BDawg62

Cool Ranch Doritos Cream Ale

40 posts in this topic

Quick update at 84 hours into fermentation.

 

What krausen had formed has begun to fall back into the beer and visible fermentation has slowed significantly.  I checked the gravity with my refractometer and found it to be where I expected for a FG (1.004).  Now just to let it finish and bottle in a week and a half.

 

Note: taste of small sample (~2 ml) didn't give much Cool Ranch Flavor but it wasn't bad either.  A larger sample at bottling will be more of a flavor indicator. 

MRB Josh R likes this

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12 hours ago, MiniYoda said:

MRB Josh........can salts affect yeast?  (thanks in advanced)

 

They can in large amounts. I don't think some Doritoes will hurt the yeast. In fact, goses (like our "Salty Dawg Grapefruit Gose" on the website) use a healthy dose of sea salt in the brewing process. But there is a point where to much salt will eventually kill the yeast. This is why it's used for preserving meats and fish - it kills organisms that will promote rot or fermentation.

 

As I said, MSG probably won't hurt the yeast in small amounts.

 

14 hours ago, yawgeh said:

 

Isn't MSG a yeast by-product though? Or is that only some strains?

 

No. As MiniYoda pointed out, MSG is a salt - not a byproduct of the yeast.

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

No. As MiniYoda pointed out, MSG is a salt - not a byproduct of the yeast.

 

I figured out my confusion - it's not a byproduct of the yeast itself but of the process to create the yeast extract that is used as a food additive. So it doesn't show up in beer, but you could perhaps make it with your trub (if you wanted to).

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13 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

I call it a making alcoholic tea. And it gives me a good reason to drink. Like right now! 

 

I had thought of brewing tea and using it instead of water to make beer. I wonder how that would work?

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56 minutes ago, Balr14 said:

 

I had thought of brewing tea and using it instead of water to make beer. I wonder how that would work?

 

There are many beers on the market brewed with tea. I had a green tea IPA from Stone awhile back that was phenomenal. The earthy tannins of the tea compliment the hops well.

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Josh R....I've read many of your postings where you said something to the equivalent that you've had a beer in a certain style, and it was either phenomenal, excellent, wonderful, or some other positive praise.

 

Have you ever had a beer you *didn't* like?

 

:D :D :D 

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58 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

Josh R....I've read many of your postings where you said something to the equivalent that you've had a beer in a certain style, and it was either phenomenal, excellent, wonderful, or some other positive praise.

 

Have you ever had a beer you *didn't* like?

 

:D :D :D 

 

Many. Especially, but not limited to, Budweiser, Coors, Miller, Heineken, Newcastle, Steel Reserve, Mickey's, Olde English, Keystone, and many others.

 

But I do love many styles of beer (that's why I'm in this business). While I'm not too partial to sweeter malty beers, I can still appreciate them for what they are.

 

My current favorites tend to be hoppy beers, sours, wilds, saisons, barrel-aged beers, and experimental styles. I really appreciate beers that had a lot of thought and love put into them.

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1 hour ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Many. Especially, but not limited to, Budweiser, Coors, Miller, Heineken, Newcastle, Steel Reserve, Mickey's, Olde English, Keystone, and many others.

 

But I do love many styles of beer (that's why I'm in this business). While I'm not too partial to sweeter malty beers, I can still appreciate them for what they are.

 

My current favorites tend to be hoppy beers, sours, wilds, saisons, barrel-aged beers, and experimental styles. I really appreciate beers that had a lot of thought and love put into them.

 

Ugh, Mickey's Big-Mouth.  I had a roommate a few decades ago who loved them.  They ALWAYS gave me a headache, even if I only had two or three.

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Bottled this one today. Tasted of a good cream ale with a heavy hint of Cool Ranch Doritos in the finish. Turned out very good in my opinion. Now to see if there will be any head retention after carbonation is complete. 

 

Overall a very drinkable and enjoyable beer. It will only get better with carbonation and conditioning.  

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39 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

Bottled this one today. Tasted of a good cream ale with a heavy hint of Cool Ranch Doritos in the finish. Turned out very good in my opinion. Now to see if there will be any head retention after carbonation is complete. 

 

Overall a very drinkable and enjoyable beer. It will only get better with carbonation and conditioning.  

 

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i'm eating Chinese food, wonder if there's a Moo Goo Gai Pan beer recipe or a Soy Sauce recipe. can you make wine or beer from soy beans??

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Put one in the fridge last night and opened it tonight.  Very nice, clean and crisp. No head retention, but that was expected.  Flavor was that of a very nice Cream Ale with a hint of Doritos in the finish. 

 

Believe it it or not a very nice beer. 

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This was very interesting to follow.  And inspirational, in a way.  It's amazing the creativity that can go into making a brew.

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