dale hihn

Ideal Temperature?

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I will be setting up my temp control/fridge/ heat this weekend and starting batch 3 in my second LBK. Just wondering what the magic temperature is for Mr Beer kits (using the kit yeast). Thanks!

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My basement in winter typically is near 62-64, so I let my beers ferment a little longer, perhaps 25 days (too lazy to check the gravity). We had a cold spell recently and I let my beer ferment a full 4 weeks. For conditioning I move them next to the boiler where it is near 68 deg F. Seems to work well.

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I've got my lbk in my bedroom upstairs.. It stays about 65-68. During high krausen the lbk temp reads about 72 with the stick on thermometer. 

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3 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

I've got my lbk in my bedroom upstairs.. It stays about 65-68. During high krausen the lbk temp reads about 72 with the stick on thermometer. 

 

One thing is all you can do is the best you can do. My first beers I tried the cooler with ice method in a 100 plus degree garage. It was not ideal, but it was the best I could do. I made several beers I really liked during that time. It is probable they would have been better fermenting at lower temps...but whatever. It was beer and it got me sluggered.

 

That being said, if you can get a set up to lower the temps, or control them, great! Go for it. 

 

If you can't....well all you can do is the best you can do. 

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Temps are always the temp of the wort.  Air temp is irrelevant.  While after peak fermentation is over they may match, at peak fermentation the wort can be 6 - 10 degrees higher.  So initially you need more temp control, then it slacks off.

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I have moved my lbk down to the kitchen counter, where the ambient temp stays mid 60's. I just moved it and am on my way to work. I'm hoping the lbk temp will be where it needs to by the time i get home. 

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7 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

I have moved my lbk down to the kitchen counter, where the ambient temp stays mid 60's. I just moved it and am on my way to work. I'm hoping the lbk temp will be where it needs to by the time i get home. 

Out of sunlight, of course. (?)

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46 minutes ago, AnthonyC said:

Out of sunlight, of course. (?)

Haha yes. Thank you for double checking. Covering it with a sheet during the daytime. @AnthonyC

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8 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

I have moved my lbk down to the kitchen counter, where the ambient temp stays mid 60's. I just moved it and am on my way to work. I'm hoping the lbk temp will be where it needs to by the time i get home. 

 

As I may have mentioned before, I am a huge fan of all you can do is the best you can do. If what you are relying on right now is the ambient temperature of your home, then that is what it is. You can't really do anything about it, so why worry about it? 

 

If it is something you are worrying about (I did) then I HIGHLY recommend getting a fridge and temp control unit. It is not that much and the ability to control your ambient temp is worth every dollar spent.

 

But in the mean, Try not to worry. We (humans) have been making beer since....I don't know...like forever. And not just those English in their nice cool weather places either! Egyptians.....Sumerians....I just read about some tribes in Mexico that make a strong homebrew corn beer.

 

Beer will be beer.

 

 

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8 hours ago, NwMaltHead said:

Haha yes. Thank you for double checking. Covering it with a sheet during the daytime. @AnthonyC

I figured that you did, but better safe than sorry.  😀👍🏽🐿

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Hope it's okay for me to chime in here...

I've got my 4th batch fermenting (Dry River Rye IPA) and I switched to the mini-fridge/Inkbird/heater method for this and future batches (works great, by the way!)....

but my issue might be with conditioning/carbonating temps....after bottling, I've been keeping my bottles in a cooler in the corner of the room, and adding water bottles with hot tap water each day to help keep the temp up...but I think mid-60s has been the average temp in the cooler.  But both my *finished* batches have been pretty flat.  After tasting my 2nd batch yesterday (Santa Rita Pale, 3 weeks/4 weeks, still pretty flat, but tasty) I put them back in the cooler to carb up for another week before I taste again.  I'm thinking I need better temp control for conditioning/carbing?  Should I invest in another fridge and temp control setup for my bottled beer, or ?  Maybe just a seedling mat heater and an inkbird in the cooler with the bottles?

Do many of the members here have separate temp control units for fermenters and for bottles?

Thanks!

Dave

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Temp of the bottles at conditioning should be constant.  I think it's supposed to be about the temp of fermentation, without going over 70 degrees.  I keep my bottles at a constant room temp of 68, and don't touch them/taste them until after conditioning.  If you open them during fermentation, you'll lose carbonation.

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Bottles can be 70 or higher.  Bottles don't ferment MiniYoda...

 

Consistent temps on bottle conditioning are not that crucial - but once you get below the mid 60s it's going to take a lot longer (50%+ longer than at 70 or higher).  Of course make sure you're putting the right amount of sugar in the bottle before bottling...  

 

I am often surprised when people say their house is at 62.  My basement is 62, but my upstairs living area is 70.

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I'm using 16 oz PET bottles with one Carb drop per bottle.  I think it should be about right for priming quantity?  I'm actually going to switch to 12 oz glass for this next batch, and still use 1 carb drop per.

I think it's all about temp for my carbing issue.  Up here (Pacific NW) it's been in the 30s to low 40s for awhile, and instead of leaving the heat on at home while I'm at work, I just try to keep the bottles in the cooler until I replace the hot water each day....but even then it only gets so warm for so long in there.  I guess I'll let them go a couple more weeks and see what the difference is....though, I'll probably contrive a way to keep the cooler temp up a little better (right about the time the weather warms up around here!)

Thanks for the input, guys!

Dave

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12 oz bottles are much better.  That's the route I've switch to.  I've been using 740ml PET bottles with two Mr. Beer carb drops. Now I'm using 12oz glass bottles with one Domino sugar cube.

 

If you want to use the PET bottles, try a bit more priming sugar.  Perhaps 1 and a half carb drops?

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50 minutes ago, david_k said:

I'm using 16 oz PET bottles with one Carb drop per bottle.  I think it should be about right for priming quantity?  I'm actually going to switch to 12 oz glass for this next batch, and still use 1 carb drop per.

I think it's all about temp for my carbing issue.  Up here (Pacific NW) it's been in the 30s to low 40s for awhile, and instead of leaving the heat on at home while I'm at work, I just try to keep the bottles in the cooler until I replace the hot water each day....but even then it only gets so warm for so long in there.  I guess I'll let them go a couple more weeks and see what the difference is....though, I'll probably contrive a way to keep the cooler temp up a little better (right about the time the weather warms up around here!)

Thanks for the input, guys!

Dave

 

Yes, that's right for 16 oz, but too much for 12 oz.  Figure at least 6 weeks at the lower temps, then at least 3 days in the frig for the carbonation to reabsorb.

sugar.png

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when your ready move up to batch priming.....its quite easy and you'll guarantee all your bottles will be evenly carbed no matter what size you use,, you can then bottle different size bottles at the same time,, Here's a link to a calculator or look up screwybrewers

 

http://www.northernbrewer.com/priming-sugar-calculator/

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one of these days, I'm going to research "batch priming" and the LBKs.  For now, 2 Mr. Beer drops or 3 Dominos cubes for a 740ml bottle, and one domino cube for a 12oz glass bottle seems to work..

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48 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

 

Yes, that's right for 16 oz, but too much for 12 oz.  Figure at least 6 weeks at the lower temps, then at least 3 days in the frig for the carbonation to reabsorb.

sugar.png

Thanks, Rick.  for 12oz, I might just switch to table sugar so I can get 3/4 tsp...meanwhile, I'll let my bottles carb for a couple more weeks.  Probably get a little mat heater for the cooler to help things stay warm.

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