dale hihn

Ideal Temperature?

63 posts in this topic

30 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Since the partial mash recipes use 6 cups instead of 4, they would end up warmer.  The 6 cups should turn into maybe 5 cups after the grain has absorbed water, but if you then sparge it that would use more water, although sparge water should not exceed 170 max.  

 

It's a simple math exercise as I've posted before.  

Thanks, but I know all of that.  The point was that saying "If you follow the Mr. Beer directions, and use refrigerated water for the gallon in the LBK and the top off water, your wort will be at the proper temperature" is wrong.

MrWhy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still use pretty much four cups of water when I steep my grains and my fridge at work holds at 33 degrees so maybe that's why I still hit my mark...

MrWhy and Shrike like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Stroomer420 said:

I still use pretty much four cups of water when I steep my grains and my fridge at work holds at 33 degrees so maybe that's why I still hit my mark...

 

Yeah, when I can keep the steep to four cups the temp is pretty spot on after topping it off.

Stroomer420 and MrWhy like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2017 at 10:01 AM, Shrike said:

Thanks, but I know all of that.  The point was that saying "If you follow the Mr. Beer directions, and use refrigerated water for the gallon in the LBK and the top off water, your wort will be at the proper temperature" is wrong.

 

Yup. If you are working in the realm of the base Mr. Beer world, that advice works perfectly. Once you start adding in some things, it changes drastically.

 

For example, with the Lock Stock and Barrel Stout, I had water from steeping the grains (and I don't know how you all manage to do it with 4 cups. I must be a kitchen moron or something!) Then you had THREE LME's....then TWO St. Pat's.......(man I can't wait for this beer!).......

 

I know I pitched too warm even with the gallon of refrigerator cold AND topping with ice cold.

 

Whatever. One of my strongest assets in this crazy brewing world is that I'm okay with the funky off flavors......and I've learned to patiently let my beer condition.

Shrike likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

Yup. If you are working in the realm of the base Mr. Beer world, that advice works perfectly. Once you start adding in some things, it changes drastically.

 

For example, with the Lock Stock and Barrel Stout, I had water from steeping the grains (and I don't know how you all manage to do it with 4 cups. I must be a kitchen moron or something!) Then you had THREE LME's....then TWO St. Pat's.......(man I can't wait for this beer!).......

 

I know I pitched too warm even with the gallon of refrigerator cold AND topping with ice cold.

 

Whatever. One of my strongest assets in this crazy brewing world is that I'm okay with the funky off flavors......and I've learned to patiently let my beer condition.

 

It depends on the recipe.  If I'm just steeping some carapils for a regular brew or doing a PM that only uses up to six ounces of grains or so and doesn't call for multiple cans of HME, I have a four quart pot I use.  I can get away with four cups in that one no problem, not counting the cup used for sparging.  But on the bigger PM ones, like Lock/Stock and Black Beer'd, I end up having to use a six quart pot.  It has a wider base than my four quart so I end up using six or more cups of water for the steep.

hotrod3539 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live in the south and just want to verify... fermenting in higher temps there is threat of off flavors.  And those can be usually be conditioned out.  If fermentation happens say closer to 70 degrees this can cause fermentation to happen faster?  And try to keep the temp down to 65 degrees.  If fermentation happens faster should it remain fermenting for the full 3 weeks?  From all the reading on the forums, I have a feeling I know the answer and that is...just be patience and wait.  

 

Since reading about the 65 degree mark I have started a batch, tried to keep the temp down and have seen a way better fermentation this time around.  I was a little amazed at how much better actually.  I see a better cooling vessel in my future for batches to come. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd also point out that you can't "see" fermentation.  You can see the krausen that forms, and a fermentation may get more vigorous at a higher temperature, but that doesn't mean it's "better".  And, as Gophers6 mentioned, you can't condition out some off flavors.

 

You should always ferment for 3 weeks, and then carbonate and condition for 4 or more weeks at 70 or higher.  Then bottle refrigerate what you'll drink 3 days later.

 

And do some reading, including my signature. 

dale hihn likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

I'd also point out that you can't "see" fermentation.  You can see the krausen that forms, and a fermentation may get more vigorous at a higher temperature, but that doesn't mean it's "better".  And, as Gophers6 mentioned, you can't condition out some off flavors.

 

You should always ferment for 3 weeks, and then carbonate and condition for 4 or more weeks at 70 or higher.  Then bottle what you'll drink 3 days later.

 

And do some reading, including my signature. 

Don't you mean refrigerate what you will drink 3 days later?

RickBeer likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, RickBeer said:

I'd also point out that you can't "see" fermentation.  You can see the krausen that forms, and a fermentation may get more vigorous at a higher temperature, but that doesn't mean it's "better".  And, as Gophers6 mentioned, you can't condition out some off flavors.

 

You should always ferment for 3 weeks, and then carbonate and condition for 4 or more weeks at 70 or higher.  Then bottle what you'll drink 3 days later.

 

And do some reading, including my signature. 

 

I guess I used the word "see" because I didn't see much of a reaction or krausen during my last last batch.  This go around I tried to control the temp better and assume as a result have better krausen.  And I'm wasn't trying to imply that faster was better by any means. I was just curious if my thinking that warm temps during fermentation did cause faster fermentation.  After reading the links you have in your signature I have a better understanding of the process and understand 65 is the place to be. Being that I'm in a warmer climate I'm just trying to figure out what surprises to expect and how to combat them better.  

Shrike likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Splorchwart said:

 

I guess I used the word "see" because I didn't see much of a reaction or krausen during my last last batch.  This go around I tried to control the temp better and assume as a result have better krausen.  And I'm wasn't trying to imply that faster was better by any means. I was just curious if my thinking that warm temps during fermentation did cause faster fermentation.  After reading the links you have in your signature I have a better understanding of the process and understand 65 is the place to be. Being that I'm in a warmer climate I'm just trying to figure out what surprises to expect and how to combat them better.  

lot of people use a cooler with frozen water bottles to control temperature,,, I got a used small fridge at a hotel liquidators for 40$ and now just gotta grab a inkbird controller for when the summer months get here....but alot of people have good results with just the cooler and frozen water bottle method to keep that 65 mark....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Splorchwart, I'm in the South also and before I discovered this forum I would just leave the LBK at room temperature during fermentation, then wonder why I could never make a really good beer. :)  Since coming here and seeing the importance of temperature control I started using the cooler/water bottle method to keep my wort at around 65 and my results have been so much better.

Splorchwart and Stroomer420 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now