VoicelessPilot

Temp control

37 posts in this topic

easy way to do it:

 

Need:  one coleman cooler   approx. cost 30 bucks

one digital aquarium thermometer with a probe on a lead...  approx. cost 5 bucks look on amazon for it.

several one liter empty water bottles, filled with tap water

 

experiment:

 

freeze about 5 water bottles to make ice bottles.

 

open cooler. put in one bottle.

put probe end of thermometer in cooler, close lid.

note the temp inside the cooler. come back in 2 hours and note temp. come back in two hours and note temp.

 

do this until you can determine what effect one bottle has on the interior of the cooler and how long one bottle can keep it cool before temps start rising.

 

next brew day, put your lbk in the cooler.  tape the probe end on the lbk below the water line on the outside of the lbk., add an ice bottle into the cooler and shut the lid on the cord for the thermometer.. it should close. the cords are plastic.

 

note temp.  you should be shooting to keep the cooler temp around 60-64 for most ales.  if in an hour or so you see the temp of the lbk isn't coming down to where you want, add more ice.

 

if you start with the wort already at pitching temp, it wont take much ice initially.  one bottle can last about 12 hours.  the amount of temperature swings in a 12 hour period will be about 5 degrees.. which if you start at 60-64 wont be that much. so don't freak out if youre a little late swapping out ice.  if you notice the ice you put in dropped the temp too low, remove some. the yeast will wake up as it gets warmer.

 

simple. 

RickBeer likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.amazon.com/HDE-Aquarium-Thermometer-Terrarium-Temperature/dp/B00W3YB2VW/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1487665360&sr=8-2&keywords=submersible+aquarium+thermometer

 

these are cheap and made in china.. but are accurate enough where you can keep tabs on your temps.  if you were using them for an expensive aquarium.. your fish would hate you for it.  mine are about 3 degrees off.  battery replacement is easy and they do last quite some time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends a bit on the ambient temps you are looking to control as well as your work schedule, etc. I went with the cooler and water bottle thing for the first bit of my brewing career. It worked, I think. But I was dealing with a 100+ degree garage and all it took was getting home later from work than anticipated or forgetting to freeze a bottle and the temps would be way too high.


I scanned the Walmart/Target/Amazon sites and eventually picked up two mini fridges for great prices. Those with a temp control unit are how I roll now and I am as happy as can be. Since ironically the problem now has been nights being much colder than normal, I've added a little seed heater mat rolled up in there to provide a bit of warmth if necessary.

 

If you've got the extra cash and space, I highly recommend the fridge route.

Steve-Oh and dale hihn like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to get serious and have precise control get a mini fridge, can heater and an Inkbird controller. I can fit 2 LBKs in it at a time. For most beers I keep it at 68 degrees, 66 during the first week of fermentation.  I just bottled 2 batches of lager Saturday that I kept around 53 degrees. I returned the bottles to the mini fridge for 3 more weeks at 53 degrees. Then I will store them at room temp for several months.  

05.thumb.jpg.cd08bdd06782aec9d83f773af983b848.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just rigged up mini fridge/inkbird/seedling mat. Rigged up for about a hundred bucks as I got the fridge second hand. You can use any mini fridge, you just have to remove the inner door skin to fit two kegs. I agree with the previous two posts, best thing I ever did. Two lbk's cooking and more time to drink beer instead of rotating bottles in the cooler. Happy brewing!

Steve-Oh likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Steve-Oh said:

If you want to get serious and have precise control get a mini fridge, can heater and an Inkbird controller. I can fit 2 LBKs in it at a time. For most beers I keep it at 68 degrees, 66 during the first week of fermentation.  I just bottled 2 batches of lager Saturday that I kept around 53 degrees. I returned the bottles to the mini fridge for 3 more weeks at 53 degrees. Then I will store them at room temp for several months.  

05.thumb.jpg.cd08bdd06782aec9d83f773af983b848.jpg

I like that, what brand/size is that mini fridge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/21/2017 at 6:29 AM, Steve-Oh said:

If you want to get serious and have precise control get a mini fridge, can heater and an Inkbird controller. I can fit 2 LBKs in it at a time. For most beers I keep it at 68 degrees, 66 during the first week of fermentation.  I just bottled 2 batches of lager Saturday that I kept around 53 degrees. I returned the bottles to the mini fridge for 3 more weeks at 53 degrees. Then I will store them at room temp for several months.  

05.thumb.jpg.cd08bdd06782aec9d83f773af983b848.jpg

 

Nice. Very close to my own set up. Only difference is I don't have a paint can heater. I have a cheapy seedling mat shoved in the door. In my area, cold temps are rarely the issue. I mostly have the mat to kick the heat back up.

 

And my cord system is not as sophisticated. My are just shoved up the door. I like what you'v got going here.


How are you measuring the temp? My inkbird thermometer is in a bottle of water in the corner.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Nice. Very close to my own set up. Only difference is I don't have a paint can heater. I have a cheapy seedling mat shoved in the door. In my area, cold temps are rarely the issue. I mostly have the mat to kick the heat back up.

 

And my cord system is not as sophisticated. My are just shoved up the door. I like what you'v got going here.


How are you measuring the temp? My inkbird thermometer is in a bottle of water in the corner.....

I just have the prob hanging off the bottom of the top shelf. I just keep in mind that the wort temps are usually 2 degrees warmer than the air temp. 

MrWhy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! 

 

I've got two fridges set up essentially the same. Right now one is storing beer that's already conditioned. 


I've got to get drinking more to empty it!

John K. likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What size is the mini fridge in this post (cubic feet)? I am currently looking for one that will hold at least two LBK's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use coolers in Florida for conditioning. 

Coleman beverage  fridge with controls does both with Lager temps as needed.

nice work on the frigidare.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has a glass door with inside temp report but I use probes like Zorak stated this is the true wort temp.2lbk.jpg.78408b88671db8960cf920b31477f8f0.jpg

 

Wow what a format, Lets make Beer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What temp should I set my inkbird for a Brown Bag special recipe?  It gives quite a range of 45 - 60 degrees.  Yeast is Saflager S-23.   Do I want to be on the cool side?  Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, KaijuBrew said:

What temp should I set my inkbird for a Brown Bag special recipe?  It gives quite a range of 45 - 60 degrees.  Yeast is Saflager S-23.   Do I want to be on the cool side?  Thanks!

45-50ish..... You want to always try and ferment on the cooler end of the scale no matter what yeast you are using..... helps prevent some of those ester driven off flavors.

KaijuBrew likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, KaijuBrew said:

What temp should I set my inkbird for a Brown Bag special recipe?  It gives quite a range of 45 - 60 degrees.  Yeast is Saflager S-23.   Do I want to be on the cool side?  Thanks!


When in doubt, always go to the manufacturer's website.

 

fermentation temperature: 9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)

KaijuBrew likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RickBeer said:


When in doubt, always go to the manufacturer's website.

 

fermentation temperature: 9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)

 

Thanks Rick and Hotrod.

 

At the end of the recipe it says to bring the temperature up to room temps for 3 days before bottling.  How does this help?  Is there some off tasting byproduct avoided by this?

hotrod3539 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You want to do some reading on lager yeast vs. ale yeast.  Yeast creates diacetyl, which mostly goes away during the latter part of fermentation, at warmer temps.  That's why it's usually not noticeable, or barely noticeable, in an ale.  In lagers, raising the temp to the high 60s for 3 days is called a "diacetyl rest".   The yeast kicks into high gear and eats it up.

kedogn, KaijuBrew and hotrod3539 like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

 

Thanks Rick and Hotrod.

 

At the end of the recipe it says to bring the temperature up to room temps for 3 days before bottling.  How does this help?  Is there some off tasting byproduct avoided by this?

 

1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

You want to do some reading on lager yeast vs. ale yeast.  Yeast creates diacetyl, which mostly goes away during the latter part of fermentation, at warmer temps.  That's why it's usually not noticeable, or barely noticeable, in an ale.  In lagers, raising the temp to the high 60s for 3 days is called a "diacetyl rest".   The yeast kicks into high gear and eats it up.

What @RickBeer said.

KaijuBrew likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

You want to do some reading on lager yeast vs. ale yeast.  Yeast creates diacetyl, which mostly goes away during the latter part of fermentation, at warmer temps.  That's why it's usually not noticeable, or barely noticeable, in an ale.  In lagers, raising the temp to the high 60s for 3 days is called a "diacetyl rest".   The yeast kicks into high gear and eats it up.

 

 

Thanks, Rick!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a mini fridge and Inkbird temp controller to lager my Dortmunder. Does anyone have any ideas how to get the temperature probe into the fridge without breaking the seal on the door? Any advice would be appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now