dale hihn

priming with DME vs sugar

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Does anyone know if there's a difference in bottle conditioning time when using DME vs. Sugar for priming? What about flavour differences? Thinking of trying in the future. Thanks. 

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I've been using table sugar since I've started,,dont see any reason to use anything else .... Dialed in where I like my carbonation,,,,, I usually go 48 grams for my ales and 36 grams for my stouts,,, I batch prime ,,,works for me.... Everyone is different so you'll have to play around till you find the levels you like..... Good luck...🍻

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22 hours ago, Stroomer420 said:

I've been using table sugar since I've started,,dont see any reason to use anything else .... Dialed in where I like my carbonation,,,,, I usually go 48 grams for my ales and 36 grams for my stouts,,, I batch prime ,,,works for me.... Everyone is different so you'll have to play around till you find the levels you like..... Good luck...🍻

Truth is , I think that there are differences in fermentation rates with different sugars. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/31746029/effect-different-sugars-rate-fermentation-yeast. 

Corn sugar is fructose (I think) and table sugar is sucrose... and I think yeast find it easier to ferment fructose than sucrose.

 

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52 minutes ago, Brewer said:

 

I never said there wasn't a difference...just said I use table sugar and batch prime...

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1 hour ago, Brewer said:

Truth is , I think that there are differences in fermentation rates with different sugars. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/31746029/effect-different-sugars-rate-fermentation-yeast. 

Corn sugar is fructose (I think) and table sugar is sucrose... and I think yeast find it easier to ferment fructose than sucrose.

 

Corn sugar is dextrose or glucose. 

Table sugar is sucrose.

 

Your reference states:  "Yeast had the highest carbon dioxide formation rates using sucrose, followed by: Splenda®, dark brown sugar, powdered sugar, light brown sugar, glucose, Sugar- In- The- Raw®, maltose, fructose, Equal®, and galactose.

 

Therefore, table sugar is in fact faster if your article is correct... 

 

Table sugar (sucrose) is a disaccharide, whereas corn sugar (dextrose / glucose) is a monosaccharide.  Sucrose is formed when a molecule of glucose bonds with a molecule of fructose.  

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

 

Corn sugar is dextrose or glucose. 

Table sugar is sucrose.

 

Your reference states:  "Yeast had the highest carbon dioxide formation rates using sucrose, followed by: Splenda®, dark brown sugar, powdered sugar, light brown sugar, glucose, Sugar- In- The- Raw®, maltose, fructose, Equal®, and galactose.

 

Therefore, table sugar is in fact faster if your article is correct... 

 

Table sugar (sucrose) is a disaccharide, whereas corn sugar (dextrose / glucose) is a monosaccharide.  Sucrose is formed when a molecule of glucose bonds with a molecule of fructose.  

 

Splenda counts?  DIET BEER!!!!!!!!!!!

 

What about Sweet 'N Low or SweetOne

 

(sorry RickBeer.......two shots of scotch and a leinenkugel.  I just had to)

 

:D :D :D

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5 hours ago, Brewer said:

Truth is , I think that there are differences in fermentation rates with different sugars. http://connection.ebscohost.com/c/articles/31746029/effect-different-sugars-rate-fermentation-yeast. 

Corn sugar is fructose (I think) and table sugar is sucrose... and I think yeast find it easier to ferment fructose than sucrose.

 

Yes, there are differences, but these differences are EXTREMELY minimal and cannot be detected without precise measurements. I prefer fermenting maltose over sucrose or fructose because that's what beer is made of.

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