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Kevin Caffrey

Dry Hopping - Particles

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So I brewed the Aztec Cerveza refill and decided to dry hop (commando style) for the first time by adding 1oz of Saaz hops 6 days before I bottled.  Now, the last couple of bottles had more particles in it than I'd prefer and I should have anticipated that.  So my question is -- what are the chances over the next 4 weeks of conditioning that most of these particles settle to the bottom of the bottles?

 

Kevin

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my last wheat beer I made I threw my hops in a muslin sack tossed in the lbk then stirred and I must of not made a good enough knot and all the hops came out.... But I cold crashed and have no particles in any of the bottles....cold crashing is definitely part of my brewing process....i recommend it to everyone....

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Yes, I should have cold crashed - was a busy week for me and I didn't plan out the process as much as I would have liked.  Sample tasted very good though so hoping those few bottles with noticeable particles take care of themselves.

 

I've only cold crashed once with the last pumpkin brew I did -- that still though left some floating puree in some bottles.

 

Kevin 

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32 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

Weeks of conditioning plus time in the fridge should take care of that.

 

Ummm that's cold crashing. :D

 

I used to spend money on hops sacks BUT that's wasted money and just one more item to sanitize. I generally do my hops commando and then cold crash. Set my temp to 35° and crash for minimum 3 days. If I used more hops then I might go as high as 5 days. Cold crashing is key to clearing up your beer. Gelatins and Irish Moss help immensely as well.

 

Patience is truly a virtue in this craft. My friends always go on and on about how they could not do what I do because they do not have the patience and self restraint. I schedule everything on the calendar in my phone. Things usually come out right on schedule. I am fortunate enough to be able to have the tools and room to do things. My fermenting is done in a 5cu deep freeze with a SS conical that has a thermos well. So the probe from my Johnson controller is in that thermos well monitoring my temps. When time to cold crash I set the controller to 35° and come back several days later to a 5 or 6 gallon batch that is crashed and clear. When I batch prime into a secondary is stays clear right to the very bottom.

 

Its all about making time for each and every step. Do not rush things. If you have a step scheduled and then cant do it for whatever reason, wait till you can do it and do it properly. For example, one evening I had scheduled to bottle my crashed brew. Daughter had to have us watch our granddaughter over night. I know hove my granddaughter is and wants my attention that I do not mind providing. No way I could have bottled without rushing and possibly messing things up. SO just waited till the next night and did it then.

 

Create a schedule and stick to it. Don't rush things. Allow enough time for a proper cold crashing ahead of bottling and you will be MUCH happier with your end product.

 

I have only been doing this a little over a year. I have done a GREAT deal of Googling and watching YouTube videos and asked a lot of dumb questions here. I have already learned a lot and some of my friends are just blown away from the beers I have created so far. My first LBK I got as a Christmas gift was a perfect stepping stone. Still have much to learn and am heading into the all grain and kegging next.

 

The greatest thing I have learned is it is ALL about the time and having the patience.

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a 1 gallon paint strainer bag is cheap, reusable, and easily sanitized after washing with a quick starsan dunk.  I use these for dry hopping.  I put a shot glass in the bag with the hops to weigh it down.  the only problem I have is after autosiphoning up all the beer on bottling,  the bag is caked with yeast gunk and takes a bit of effort to clean sometimes. they also work well for fruit, peppers or anything else you want to flavor a beer with for a week. 

 

I don't have the ability to coldcrash in my fridge so this is a great work around.

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2 minutes ago, zorak1066 said:

  the bag is caked with yeast gunk and takes a bit of effort to clean sometimes.

 

After I am finished with an LBK or conical with fermenting, I rinse them as best I can then fill them with water and add PBW. The PBW soak removes ALL caked on everything from every nook and cranny. It will be nice and clean for storage and the next use. So if your bag is caked you could add it to that PBW soak and youll see it is nice and clean. PBW is well worth the money for cleaning and maintaining your equipment.

 

Also makes it REAL easy to soak and remove labels from commercial brews whose bottles you wish to re-use.   :)

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11 hours ago, MrWhy said:

I've never cold crashed and do not anticipate ever doing so.....

 

Do you mean that at bottling some particles got in?

 

Weeks of conditioning plus time in the fridge should take care of that.

 

Yes, at bottling, some hop particles got in a few bottles.  

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