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sabres032

The Jim Johnson memorial Landbier

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1 hour ago, Nickfixit said:

EEEuw.............. what a lot of stuff in the bottom. Is it hop pellets?   Cornflakes?

Its the Proteins and yeast... and stuff.....happens with all grain batches (or at least mine anyway). it is interesting to watch that go from that fluffy stuff to LOTS of fluffy stuff and then down to the fine sand looking trub you normally see...

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12 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

EEEuw.............. what a lot of stuff in the bottom. Is it hop pellets?   Cornflakes?

 

11 hours ago, hotrod3539 said:

Its the Proteins and yeast... and stuff.....happens with all grain batches (or at least mine anyway). it is interesting to watch that go from that fluffy stuff to LOTS of fluffy stuff and then down to the fine sand looking trub you normally see...

 

3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Irish Moss and Whirlfloc are the same thing, don't know why you would have both.  And they should make the fermenter much clearer than that, unless all the pot contents were poured in.

I always leave my proteins in the pot. I think it was once popular belief that the proteins were bad for fermentation. Hence why people look for the best way to chill their wort fast to get a good solid cold break.

 

but as with anything in brewing i have also heard professional brewers say that the protien is beneficial in fermentation. Maybe itll always be a preference thing. Either way, you get beer.

 

this is my cerveza crud that i opted to leave out of the fermenter 

 

IMG_2405.PNG

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4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Irish Moss and Whirlfloc are the same thing, don't know why you would have both.  And they should make the fermenter much clearer than that, unless all the pot contents were poured in.

 

19 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

 

 

I always leave my proteins in the pot. I think it was once popular belief that the proteins were bad for fermentation. Hence why people look for the best way to chill their wort fast to get a good solid cold break.

 

but as with anything in brewing i have also heard professional brewers say that the protien is beneficial in fermentation. Maybe itll always be a preference thing. Either way, you get beer.

 

this is my cerveza crud that i opted to leave out of the fermenter 

 

IMG_2405.PNG

 

I don't have a wort chiller yet because the basin and pipes in my utility room need replacing. For the time being I'm just chilling the boil kettle in an ice and cold water bath. Maybe I'm not reaching cold break fast enough for the gunk to settle. Once the wort it cooled to pitching temp, I run it through a fine mesh strainer into the fermenter. It does a good job of catching any hop particles but the other gunk still gets through. 

 

This will get transferred to a secondary on Saturday for a couple weeks then cold crash before bottling. I'm still making beer that is clear when I pour into my point glass and it tastes good so I'm not worried. 

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18 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

 

 

I always leave my proteins in the pot. I think it was once popular belief that the proteins were bad for fermentation. Hence why people look for the best way to chill their wort fast to get a good solid cold break.

 

but as with anything in brewing i have also heard professional brewers say that the protien is beneficial in fermentation. Maybe itll always be a preference thing. Either way, you get beer.

 

this is my cerveza crud that i opted to leave out of the fermenter 

 

IMG_2405.PNG

I have noticed a much more active and agressive fermentation when I leave them (not all but some) in for fermentation.

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Hot break should not be transferred.  The purpose of using whirlfloc is to clump things up so you can avoid transferring it.  There is no benefit to transferring it into the fermenter, in fact, by transferring proteins into the wort you run a higher chance of chill haze.  Zero benefit.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Hot break should not be transferred.  The purpose of using whirlfloc is to clump things up so you can avoid transferring it.  There is no benefit to transferring it into the fermenter, in fact, by transferring proteins into the wort you run a higher chance of chill haze.  Zero benefit.

Body and head retention would be a benefit. 

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19 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Hot break should not be transferred.  The purpose of using whirlfloc is to clump things up so you can avoid transferring it.  There is no benefit to transferring it into the fermenter, in fact, by transferring proteins into the wort you run a higher chance of chill haze.  Zero benefit.

There is also no issue with transferring it either.  @hotrod3539 my fermenters all look just like that but end up with a shallow layer of trub on the bottom after fermentation.

 

I did an experiment where I transferred only clear wort into one fermenter and then all of the remaining wort into another fermenter, hot break, trub and everything you are suppose to leave out.  I fermented both at the same temperature and then bottled and conditioned both at the same temperature.  Took them to my brew club and did a blind triangle test.  Out of 18 participants only 5 were able to pick the beer that had all of the hot break and trub in the fermenter.  And those 5 actually preferred that beer over the other.  With the result only being 5 in a triangle test that means there is no significant difference between the beers.

 

And these beers like all of my other AG beers are clear enough to read through.  I have read where boil vigor affects chill haze more than anything else.

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On 3/31/2017 at 1:22 PM, sabres032 said:

Tomorrow I'm brewing a Landbier dedicated to Jim Johnson. Last year, Jim and I were discussing a recipe for a competition he was going to enter but I never heard the results from the batch. This batch is a little different from the one he decided on but hey, it's a farmhouse ale, the is no real style. 

 

Using the Mangrove Jack M27 Belgian Ale yeast @HoppySmile! sent me a few months ago in a trade. A 1 liter starter is already cooking. Here's the recipe.

 

Screenshot_20170331-134117.png

Sabers, thanks for posting.  I will have to brew this at some point in honor of Jim as well. 

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On 4/2/2017 at 10:33 AM, Creeps McLane said:

 

 

I always leave my proteins in the pot. I think it was once popular belief that the proteins were bad for fermentation. Hence why people look for the best way to chill their wort fast to get a good solid cold break.

 

but as with anything in brewing i have also heard professional brewers say that the protien is beneficial in fermentation. Maybe itll always be a preference thing. Either way, you get beer.

 

this is my cerveza crud that i opted to leave out of the fermenter 

 

IMG_2405.PNG

 

Yesterday I did a 30 minute hop stand with my Smash Ale and all the hot break smutz settled to the bottom of the boil kettle. I was able to keep about 90% of it in the kettle when I racked to the fermenter. 

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Bottled this batch yesterday and thought, hey, why not put 16.9oz in to a flip top bottle and not carbonate. Refrigerated over night and poured it today and WOW!!! Nice color, balanced malt and bitterness with a huge minty flavor. Let my cousin and his girlfriend try it and they love it. 

 

 

IMG_20170423_173432-01.jpeg

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On 4/24/2017 at 8:01 AM, Bluejaye said:

Looks great. I'm having a hard time finding that hop local. Or that hop and yeast mail-order.

 

The yeast I got in a trade and the hop was leftover from a brew my cousin and I made a few months ago. 

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