KaijuBrew

First Partial Mash Recipe Brewed!

53 posts in this topic

Batch number 14 and this is my first partial mash recipe!  I brewed the El Gordito Mexican Lager and I am looking forward to trying it when it is ready (around the 4th of July I would guess!).

 

It did take longer than just an extract or extract and LME batch but it did feel more like making beer and less "easy-bake-oven" than some of the simpler recipes!  

 

I'll let everyone know how it turns out! 

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Great job and welcome to the partial mash family.  I'm wondering if a bit more water should have been used to completely cover the grain bag. 

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you also wanna make sure you don't tie the grain bag to tight ,,,you wanna make sure the water can get thru all the grains...looks good ?

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I wondered that too, Mini. I think my pot was too big.  I added an extra cup of water and it still did not cover the whole grain bag.  So I used sanitized tongs to flip the bag every 10 minutes or so for the 30 minute seep.  Next time I will use a smaller pot.

 

Also, when it came to adding the hops, I used the sanitized tongs to move it to the LBK.  It the past I had trouble moving the wort over to the LBK when the dry hop bag was still in there.  So this time I just moved it over first.

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There was some corn dust too that seeped out of the bag.  I assume that gets fermented or settles in bottling?  Probably not a bad idea to cold crash this batch before bottling, no?

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El Gordito seems like a lot of work (and fun) for a batch that nets an ABV of 3.5%!  :-)

 

Chasing taste, not ABV - repeat 20 times!

 

But I am sure it will be refreshing on hot days in July!

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it should be very good for the summer.  If you are chasing ABV, you can always add a booster.  If you want ABV *AND* taste, the LME's are always great.

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4 minutes ago, KaijuBrew said:

There was some corn dust too that seeped out of the bag.  I assume that gets fermented or settles in bottling?  Probably not a bad idea to cold crash this batch before bottling, no?

 

Cold crashing is never a bad idea, but I'm thinking some of the corn dust will be fermented and become part of the beer during the next three weeks.  Do you have a hydrometer or a refractometer to check the ABV?

 

 

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2 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

 

Cold crashing is never a bad idea, but I'm thinking some of the corn dust will be fermented and become part of the beer during the next three weeks.  Do you have a hydrometer or a refractometer to check the ABV?

 

 

Nothing like that just yet, Mini!  Heck, this is my first outing with the cooper's temperature gauge!  

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Don't worry about ABV......if you drink enough on an empty stomach you will get a healthy buzz....and if not just have a shot of clean, high quality vodka before each bottle. (And this is from a a guy who thinks anything below 8%ABV is a session beer.)

 

I don't cold crash before bottling and I don't worry. Everything will take care of itself during  a long conditioning and enough time in the fridge.

 

I always use enough water to cover my grains and it is never anywhere near what Mr. Beer recommends. Again, I don't worry. I drink a lot while brewing and let everything settle itself.

 

 

 

 

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Congrats!!

 

Side note... mix the grains before you put them in the bag (looks like they are layered in the pic for example it looks like all the corn is on the top) you get better extraction of the good stuff (or something like that... i cant remember the word for word explination...) 

You can use more water in the pot to cover the grains.. i think i used about twice what the directions said... then cooled it down by setting the pot in an ice bath for a bit because i knew there wasnt going to be enough cold water in the LBK to bring it down to pitching temp. (Stir the wort while it is in the ice bath... just use a sanitized spoon and sanitized thermometer till its below 100*F.. i went closer to 80*F before i poured into the LBK)

I ALWAYS Cold crash every batch... i was told it was a sin not to by @RickBeer

 

When all else fails.. RDWHAHB!!! (Relax, Dont Worry..Have A Home Brew!)

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Takes a little more time, but it is part of the enjoyment. BTW- I might be wrong, but from the picture it appears that your thermometer is touching the bottom of the pot. Try and keep it a inch or so off the bottom. You want the temperature of the wort, not the pot. 

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9 hours ago, Brian N. said:

Takes a little more time, but it is part of the enjoyment. BTW- I might be wrong, but from the picture it appears that your thermometer is touching the bottom of the pot. Try and keep it a inch or so off the bottom. You want the temperature of the wort, not the pot. 

Thanks.  The thermometer is about 1 cm from the bottom of the pot, good tip!

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9 hours ago, hotrod3539 said:

Congrats!!

 

Side note... mix the grains before you put them in the bag (looks like they are layered in the pic for example it looks like all the corn is on the top) you get better extraction of the good stuff (or something like that... i cant remember the word for word explination...) 

You can use more water in the pot to cover the grains.. i think i used about twice what the directions said... then cooled it down by setting the pot in an ice bath for a bit because i knew there wasnt going to be enough cold water in the LBK to bring it down to pitching temp. (Stir the wort while it is in the ice bath... just use a sanitized spoon and sanitized thermometer till its below 100*F.. i went closer to 80*F before i poured into the LBK)

I ALWAYS Cold crash every batch... i was told it was a sin not to by @RickBeer

 

When all else fails.. RDWHAHB!!! (Relax, Dont Worry..Have A Home Brew!)

 

More good tips.  I have two more partial mash recipes to make (Naughty Cream Ale and Brown Bag) and I am sure they will be better for these tips!

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Any tips on proper temps for the Salfager S-23 lager yeast?  This is my first time using this yeast.  The Recipe says brew between 45 - 60.  I am adding ice packs to my cooler / fermentation chamber to keep the temp down.

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you wanna try and hold it at 55 during fermentation....then do a diacetyl rest for three days at the end of fermentation,,that's where you then raise your temp to like 70 for those three days..... There's lots if info on here about the D-rest,, do a little search or someone on here might have a better explanation..... Good luck!!!.?

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1 hour ago, KaijuBrew said:

Any tips on proper temps for the Salfager S-23 lager yeast?  This is my first time using this yeast.  The Recipe says brew between 45 - 60.  I am adding ice packs to my cooler / fermentation chamber to keep the temp down.

 

Manufacturer's info on any  yeast is easily found via Google. Here's the info on the S-23: http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/SFG_S23.pdf

 

Fermentation temperature: 9-22°C (48.2-71.6°F) ideally 12-15°C (53.6-59°F)

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I'll add another vote for using a bigger grain bag. As was stated tie it loose. It will allow the bag to flatten out in the pot and you won't need to put in the extra water. 

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2 hours ago, efdbrian said:

I'll add another vote for using a bigger grain bag. As was stated tie it loose. It will allow the bag to flatten out in the pot and you won't need to put in the extra water. 

 

I just used the muslin sack that came with the recipe from Mr. Beer.  Should I have used two bags or gone out and bought grain bag?

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10 minutes ago, KaijuBrew said:

 

I just used the muslin sack that came with the recipe from Mr. Beer.  Should I have used two bags or gone out and bought grain bag?

 

I use the muslin sacks, too.  You want to leave room for the grains to expand and "lay out" a bit.  So when you tie it off, leave a good amount of room; you don't want the knot snug up against the grains.  Same goes for when you do hops, too, as the pellets will expand...a lot.

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Having a little trouble getting the temp of the LBK below 60 degrees to ferment.  I am using bottles of frozen water and liquid cooler packs in a cooler to try to do so.  Hopefully the slightly higher temps during fermentation won't be a problem.

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The trick to lagers (assuming this is what you made), is that you have to use a dedicated fridge or freezer dedicated to fermenting, and add this device.

 

http://www.mrbeer.com/digital-temperature-controller-outlet-thermostat

 

Put the probe in fridge, plug the fridge into the controller, and the controller into the outlet.  Then, program the controller for the temp you want inside the fridge.  I start a bit colder (say 53) than the 55 recommended for fermentation temperature, then bring the fridge up to 55 or 56 once the main part of fermenting is done. 
 

Note I said "dedicated".  You can't use your main fridge in your kitchen, or the normal food will spoil.

 

 

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Actually, the probe should be taped to the side of the fermenter, below the liquid line, with a pad of material (folded rag works) between the probe and the air.  This insulates the probe from the air temp, giving a more accurate reading.

 

Piece of duct tape, cloth, probe, side of fermenter.

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