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Carbonation

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For my next batch of brew I want to use the 12 oz. bottles. The Mr. Beer carbonation drops are to much. What amount of sugar does one need, any special kind of sugar or a way to use the drops, that is the question.

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You may want to spend some time reading the forums, this question is often asked.

 

First, if you go back to your kit, you'll find a sugar chart (see below) that tells you the exact amount of sugar Mr. Beer recommends.  It's also on the Mr. Beer website.  sugar.png

 

Make sure you have a bottle capper, and do NOT use screw top bottles.

 

The least expensive sugar, i.e. table sugar that you have in the house, is recommended.  There is zero difference in end results regardless of what you use.

 

A Mr. Beer sugar measurer helps if you use table sugar.  post-57583-0-15318000-1424611474_thumb.jpg

 

If you want to use the drops, use a pill splitter to cut them.

moots and MRB Tim like this

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Thanks again. Looks like 3/4 tsp is the measure. My last batch using the standard plastics bottles from the LBK kit had some carbonation loss in some of the bottles. The brew itself was great.

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Carbonation loss has nothing to do with plastic bottles.  It has everything to do with:

 

- caps not properly tightened

- caps worn out (figure 5 - 8 uses max)

- improper level of sugar added

- inadequate time in refrigerator, allow 3 days for CO2 to absorb back into beer

- insufficient time allowed (4 weeks at least)

- improper temperature (70 or higher, if 65 - 70 add 50% more time)

 

3/4 is recommended by Mr. Beer.  Many use 1/2.  Try both, mark your bottles, and do a blind test to see what you prefer.

 

DrMJG and MrWhy like this

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22 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Carbonation loss has nothing to do with plastic bottles.  It has everything to do with:

 

- caps not properly tightened

- caps worn out (figure 5 - 8 uses max)

- improper level of sugar added

- inadequate time in refrigerator, allow 3 days for CO2 to absorb back into beer

- insufficient time allowed (4 weeks at least)

- improper temperature (70 or higher, if 65 - 70 add 50% more time)

 

3/4 is recommended by Mr. Beer.  Many use 1/2.  Try both, mark your bottles, and do a blind test to see what you prefer.

 

 

Hey Rick - not to hijack this thread, but I am going to anyways.

 

You are a font of knowledge in all things -

 

You know how after you twist on then off the cap it leaves that little plastic ring? Well that ring needs to be removed when you get new caps......any ideas on how to do this easily?

 

Scissors were not easy.

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I took a pair of snips, and a screwdriver.  One person pried up the ring, and the other cut.

 

Or, you can break the ring off the new cap, but it's not very easy.  

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24 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

I took a pair of snips, and a screwdriver.  One person pried up the ring, and the other cut.

 

Or, you can break the ring off the new cap, but it's not very easy.  


Thanks Rick!

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I break the ring off the new cap- really not a big deal any way you choose to remove the ring. Lately, I've been using 12 oz glass bottles, so back to the original post question -For 12 oz bottles I use 1/2 tea spoon of sugar. 3/4 teaspoon is a bit too "fizzy" for my personal taste.

John K. likes this

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2 hours ago, MrWhy said:

removed when you get new caps

I use a sawz all but make sure you're not drunk, u may mess up some of the bottles, plus use protective gear to protect the plastic bottles from further damage

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52 minutes ago, Brian N. said:

I break the ring off the new cap- really not a big deal any way you choose to remove the ring. Lately, I've been using 12 oz glass bottles, so back to the original post question -For 12 oz bottles I use 1/2 tea spoon of sugar. 3/4 teaspoon is a bit too "fizzy" for my personal taste.

 

Same here, except I use Domino's Dots.  They're 1/2 tsp each so no fuss, no measuring, no funnel, just clean hands and one cube per bottle.

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I've let beers sit in the fridge for 3 days, and I've also drank them after putting them in the freezer just long enough to get them cold. I can't say I've noticed that much difference between the two.

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Following advice I was given a while back, for sugaring you may want to cut back 1/4 tsp if using table sugar from the guide.  As I am not a fan at all of fizzy beer, this so called "rule of thumb" works for me.  If you want a fuller fizz, the chart is very good.  Some domestic beers have a tad too much carbonization for me and I avoid those.  You might want a "sample bottle" with full sugar from the chart and one a bit less.  Then you get to find the taste that pleases you.  Agree as well with a full refridg time.  Helps the beer is oh so many ways.

 

 

 

10620717_10204247408418471_1710465230858287992_n.jpg

moots and MichaelL like this

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Agree completely with the Gonzo Dr.  The amounts on the MrBeer carbing chart are rather high.  Cut them back by 25% or so and you'll be in good shape.

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For my last brew, I used glass bottles for the first time too.  Instead of individually priming each bottle, I batch primed the whole lot using a bottling bucket (purchased at a local homebrew store).  I found it very easy to do, and carbonation has been very consistent.  I will do this on all of my batches from now on.  I use the following calculator that seams to be a little more accurate, and can give you different CO2 amounts depending on the style of beer.

 

http://www.brewblogger.net/index.php?page=tools

 

Simply choose priming sugar calculator.  Has options for table sugar, corn sugar, maple syrup, honey, etc.  I used corn sugar and liked the results.

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2 hours ago, Bad Andy said:

For my last brew, I used glass bottles for the first time too.  Instead of individually priming each bottle, I batch primed the whole lot using a bottling bucket (purchased at a local homebrew store).  I found it very easy to do, and carbonation has been very consistent.  I will do this on all of my batches from now on.  I use the following calculator that seams to be a little more accurate, and can give you different CO2 amounts depending on the style of beer.

 

http://www.brewblogger.net/index.php?page=tools

 

Simply choose priming sugar calculator.  Has options for table sugar, corn sugar, maple syrup, honey, etc.  I used corn sugar and liked the results.

 

That's a handy link, thanks.  I've never primed with anything other than table sugar until finally trying dextrose on my last batch -- curious if there will be any difference taste-wise.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

ZERO difference taste-wise.  You should use the cheapest sugar you can get, which is table sugar.

 

The calculator at http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/ is highly recommended.

 

Yeah, kinda forgot about Screwy's calculators -- I especially like the carbonation volumes-by-style chart.

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