TacTicToe

BIAB question

22 posts in this topic

So I am starting to get more into the all grain brews now. Have had tremendous successes with the extracts and partial mashes. Some of my friends and co-workers swear there is no way I am making these beers.  :lol: I take that as a compliment.

 

All the videos I watch comparing all grain to extract, seems all grain wins every time. So if the extracts are this good, I can not wait to try all grain. I have decided to go the BIAB method as it only requires cleaning one vessel versus three.

 

I am looking to do 5 gallon batches for the most part. Bought a great 10 gallon SS pot with a built-in thermometer and drain port. Ordered what I needed to make a Fat Tire clone and another Arctic Devil clone. I am currently enjoying the second half of the Fat Tire clone I made. It was done from extract and IMO is spot on, just slightly higher ABV. Beer is delicious. My Arctic Devil's are only a couple months old, and still need 10 more months of aging. Also extract. I tried one a couple night ago, and WOW was it good. DEFINITELY a sipping beer. Not a lot of head, but the vids I have seen the original does not have it either. This is a English style barleywine that's around 15.5% ABV. And yeah, after a 12oz bottle you're done. Like seriously...

 

At any rate, I am thinking I may have messed up. The problem is this. The product arrived today and I didn't realize the grain bill for the Arctic Devil. It is 47 lbs of grain! From what I am reading you need 1.25 qts of water per pound of grain. If that is the case, I am looking at 14.75 gal of strike water to mash in? Is there any way of pulling this off with a 10 gallon pot or do I need to get a 20 gallon pot just to make this 5 gallon brew?!! If so, this is kind of going to suck!

 

Help!  :blink:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, TacTicToe said:

So I am starting to get more into the all grain brews now. Have had tremendous successes with the extracts and partial mashes. Some of my friends and co-workers swear there is no way I am making these beers.  :lol: I take that as a compliment.

 

All the videos I watch comparing all grain to extract, seems all grain wins every time. So if the extracts are this good, I can not wait to try all grain. I have decided to go the BIAB method as it only requires cleaning one vessel versus three.

 

I am looking to do 5 gallon batches for the most part. Bought a great 10 gallon SS pot with a built-in thermometer and drain port. Ordered what I needed to make a Fat Tire clone and another Arctic Devil clone. I am currently enjoying the second half of the Fat Tire clone I made. It was done from extract and IMO is spot on, just slightly higher ABV. Beer is delicious. My Arctic Devil's are only a couple months old, and still need 10 more months of aging. Also extract. I tried one a couple night ago, and WOW was it good. DEFINITELY a sipping beer. Not a lot of head, but the vids I have seen the original does not have it either. This is a English style barleywine that's around 15.5% ABV. And yeah, after a 12oz bottle you're done. Like seriously...

 

At any rate, I am thinking I may have messed up. The problem is this. The product arrived today and I didn't realize the grain bill for the Arctic Devil. It is 47 lbs of grain! From what I am reading you need 1.25 qts of water per pound of grain. If that is the case, I am looking at 14.75 gal of strike water to mash in? Is there any way of pulling this off with a 10 gallon pot or do I need to get a 20 gallon pot just to make this 5 gallon brew?!! If so, this is kind of going to suck!

 

Help!  :blink:

 

 

Man oh man. Thats a lot of grain. If you really want to try this youd have to do multiple mashes using the last mashs wort as your next mash water. However with all the grain absorbsion im not sure if you'd end up netting 5 gallons when you're all done. Youd have to do at least 3 mashes. Jamil says this is the best way

MrWhy and efdbrian like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Man oh man. Thats a lot of grain. If you really want to try this youd have to do multiple mashes using the last mashs wort as your next mash water. However with all the grain absorbsion im not sure if you'd end up netting 5 gallons when you're all done. Youd have to do at least 3 mashes. Jamil says this is the best way

 

Would it be possible to split the grains in half....mash one half at a time?

Creeps McLane likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

 

Would it be possible to split the grains in half....mash one half at a time?

Sure, but then youd prob have two seperate worts at maybe around 8%. Then youd prob have to combine them and boil for 1,000 hours. (Exaggerated)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, efdbrian said:

 

That was an interesting episode. I would have never guessed. 

Basically if you listened to that, then hes saying that water doesnt have a limited amout of sugar it can hold. You can just keep going. Seems most people think water can only get so fermentable

MrWhy and efdbrian like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, efdbrian said:

 

That was an interesting episode. I would have never guessed. 

PS. This is the best sunday session i have listened to so far. I think you can basically skip the first hour to get to the educational stuff.

 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-session-02-13-17-beachwood-brewing/id217652795?i=1000381233841&mt=2

MrWhy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Basically if you listened to that, then hes saying that water doesnt have a limited amout of sugar it can hold. You can just keep going. Seems most people think water can only get so fermentable

 

Yeah which is what surprised me. I would have guessed that there would be decreasing efficiencies. 

Creeps McLane likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

Basically if you listened to that, then hes saying that water doesnt have a limited amout of sugar it can hold. You can just keep going. Seems most people think water can only get so fermentable

I have not had the chance to listen yet. What is the take away for brewers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, MrWhy said:

I have not had the chance to listen yet. What is the take away for brewers?

 

The short answer is less water needed for big beers.

 

In the above example, there is a 47lb grain bill. I can get close to 20 pounds or grain plus water in my mash tun. This means that I would need to do 3 separate mashes. By conventional theory you would need around 15 gallons of strike water for the three mashes depending on your preferred mash thickness. Add in sparge water and you have even more. I'll say 20 gallons total for round math. If your average boil off rate is about a gallon per hour, you would need to boil your wort for about 15 hours to make a 5 gallon batch. Not very practical. 

 

What they talked about in the show is that in their brewery (I think it was Jamil) when they have a big beer, they reuse the wort from the first mash as the strike water. If you split this grain bill up for @TacTicToe's example, the mash schedule might look something like this:

  1. Mash 16lb with 5 gallons of water. If you assume a grain absorption rate of 0.5 quarts per pound, you can sparge with about 2 gallons and you will collect about 5 gallons of wort.
  2. Clean out your mash tun
  3. Heat up the collected 5 gallons of wort to strike temp and mash the next 16lbs of grain using the wort collected from the first mash as your strike water. Sparge with another 2 gallons of water to collect 5 gallons of wort.
  4. Clean out your mash tun
  5. Heat up the collected 5 gallons of wort to strike temp and mash the final 15lbs of grain using the wort collected from the first mash as your strike water. Sparge with water as needed to get your target starting volume.
  6. Total collected wort will be ~6.5 - 7 gallons depending on your system and how long you want to boil. This is much better than 20 gallons in the 'traditional' way of thinking.

I know you are probably saying to yourself "Won't the sugars in the wort be absorbed into the grain each time?" Apparently the answer is no. From their experience in the brewery, they have not found that to be the case. I didn't want to believe it when I listened to the show and I'm really anxious to try this.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Creeps McLane said:

@MrWhy you start this damn London porter thing yet??? Keep us updated

 

30 minutes into the hop boil!

 

Things are going well.

 

I'll post a write up on my little thread I keep going.

KaijuBrew and Creeps McLane like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok reading thru this thread and what I have read elsewhere, this is going to be my plan of attack.

 

The grains were crushed and sealed in 2 separate bags at 23.5 lbs each.

 

I have a 10 gallon SS brew pot. BIAB fits in perfectly. Hopefully this works...?

 

Going to heat 4 gallons of water to 168 degrees,

Drop in the 23.5 lbs of grain from first bag and mash for 60 mins.

Sparge that with 175 degree water till I am back at 4 gallons.

Heat that wort to 168 degrees.

Drop in the second 23.5 lbs of grain and mash for another 60 mins.

Sparge that with 175 degree water till I am back at 5 gallons.

Heat that wort to rolling boil and continue with my 60 min boil and hop additions as normal.

 

Yes? No?

 

I think in the future I will just stick to extract with these big ass brews. :wacko:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, TacTicToe said:

Ok reading thru this thread and what I have read elsewhere, this is going to be my plan of attack.

 

The grains were crushed and sealed in 2 separate bags at 23.5 lbs each.

 

I have a 10 gallon SS brew pot. BIAB fits in perfectly. Hopefully this works...?

 

Going to heat 4 gallons of water to 168 degrees,

Drop in the 23.5 lbs of grain from first bag and mash for 60 mins.

Sparge that with 175 degree water till I am back at 4 gallons.

Heat that wort to 168 degrees.

Drop in the second 23.5 lbs of grain and mash for another 60 mins.

Sparge that with 175 degree water till I am back at 5 gallons.

Heat that wort to rolling boil and continue with my 60 min boil and hop additions as normal.

 

Yes? No?

 

I think in the future I will just stick to extract with these big ass brews. :wacko:

 

 

 

What is leading you to starting with 4 gallons? Where are you getting that calculation from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making sure I have enough room that every thing fits. 23.5 lbs of grain is going to swell and take up a lot of room in my pot. I should have about 7.3 gallons but I do not think it would all fit without most of the water spilling out onto the ground.

 

Since the grains are sealed in a plastic bag, I guess I could put 7.3 gallons in the pot and the grain while still in the bag to see what happens...

 

MrWhy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@TacTicToe -

 

Hey - Triple T......

 

Where did you get this all grain clone from? I am looking at the one from Austin Homebrew and it is 23.25 pounds of grain.....I cannot  figure out any 43 pound grain bill for a 5 gallon....are you sure they didn't send you two by accident????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 row... 5 gal..  43 lbs????   that would be about 1.23 starting grav! wowzers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now