AnthonyC

Bottling Yeast

21 posts in this topic

It's getting close to the time when I have to bottle my Barleywine recipe.  Directions say to add a fresh pack of yeast to the bottling bucket to ensure proper carbonation b/c of its massive alcohol content.  Has anyone ever done this before?  Is it a recipe for destruction a la bottle bombs?  Thanks in advance.  😀🐿

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thought process is that due to the high alcohol content most of the yeast will be spent by the time for fermentation is done. Adding fresh yeast will allow carbonation to occur because there will be active yeast to consume the sugars that you put in at bottling.  The only way you would get bottle bombs is if you add too much sugar at bottling.

 

At least that's my take on it having done it once before.

 

Just my $0.02

efdbrian, Brewer and AnthonyC like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, scouterbill said:

The thought process is that due to the high alcohol content most of the yeast will be spent by the time for fermentation is done. Adding fresh yeast will allow carbonation to occur because there will be active yeast to consume the sugars that you put in at bottling.  The only way you would get bottle bombs is if you add too much sugar at bottling.

 

At least that's my take on it having done it once before.

 

Just my $0.02

Thank you, Bill.  😀👍🏽🐿

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, scouterbill said:

The only way you would get bottle bombs is if you add too much sugar at bottling.

 

Or incomplete fermentation which can happen with these big beers. Make absolutely sure that it is completely done fermenting.

Big Sarge likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, efdbrian said:

 

Or incomplete fermentation which can happen with these big beers. Make absolutely sure that it is completely done fermenting.

It better be.  Between primary & secondary it sat in a bucket for almost 6mth!  Conditioning time is optimally up to 2yrs.  

C-ya and MrWhy like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL I'd say it's a pretty safe bet that it's done. Also a good reason to add some fresh yeast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen some breweries add yeast at bottling, a true bottle-conditioning. It's pretty much across the board on all of their beers, not to a specific style. Like @RickBeer said, just a pinch of them. Regardless of the time in the secondary, there is a time/moment when the yeast simply stops doing its thing, whether it be environmentally related or maxing out on viability (I know there's a yeast related term for this, basically saying the yeast can't handle the high ABV). I see nothing wrong with the practice, but you might want to do some research on exactly how much yeast you'll want to sprinkle in the bottle. 

MrWhy likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Big Sarge said:

I've seen some breweries add yeast at bottling, a true bottle-conditioning. It's pretty much across the board on all of their beers, not to a specific style. Like @RickBeer said, just a pinch of them. Regardless of the time in the secondary, there is a time/moment when the yeast simply stops doing its thing, whether it be environmentally related or maxing out on viability (I know there's a yeast related term for this, basically saying the yeast can't handle the high ABV). I see nothing wrong with the practice, but you might want to do some research on exactly how much yeast you'll want to sprinkle in the bottle. 

What they're telling me is to add a fresh packet to the bottling bucket.  I'm going to assume that they mean Wyeast or White Lab b/c how else could I get it to mix if it's all floating at the top of the bucket?  BTW...  Congrats on the promotion, Sarge!

 

 

IMG_0327.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks @AnthonyC! It unfortunately means long effing days at work, but I'm surviving. 

I second the assumption of using liquid yeast in the bottling bucket. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My impression is that most Barley Wines are quite low in carbonation. So I am ot sure why to add new yeast if that is the product intended. Of course if you want it to fizz like champagne that is a different story, use champagne yeast :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

What they're telling me is to add a fresh packet to the bottling bucket.  I'm going to assume that they mean Wyeast or White Lab b/c how else could I get it to mix if it's all floating at the top of the bucket?

AC,

 

Just use dry yeast and rehydrate it first.  If your beer has been in primary and secondary for 6 months that yeast is going to be tired and fresh yeast will ensure carbonation.

 

Dawg

AnthonyC likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

AC,

 

Just use dry yeast and rehydrate it first.  If your beer has been in primary and secondary for 6 months that yeast is going to be tired and fresh yeast will ensure carbonation.

 

Dawg

Thanks Dawg.  😀👍🏽🐿

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when i do a high alc beer that has a secondary fermentation.. and sits for months before bottling...   i merely take a blah yeast like us05 and add a few grains to the bottle before bottling.  never got any infections.. just used a piece of tin foil and knocked out a few grains from the sachet then transferred to the bottle.

AnthonyC likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Nice topic, @AnthonyC.  I love barleywines for the holidays.  My first homebrew (at a brew shop) was a barleywine with a coworker back in 1997.  I have some Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barleywine from 2013 in the basement now.  I also have some Samichlaus from 2012, 2013, and I think 2014.  Both of these beers age really well.  I usually drink two or 3 bottles of them over the holidays, and pick up more each season to keep the aging pipeline going.

 

(Puts barleywine on the list...)

Edited by C-ya
Spelling and date
MrWhy and AnthonyC like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, C-ya said:

Nice topic, @AnthonyC.  I love barleywines for the holidays.  My first homebrew (at a brew shop) was a barleywine with a coworker back in 1997.  I have some Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barleywine from 2013 in the basement now.  I also have some Samichlaus from 2012, 2013, and I think 2014.  Both of these beers age really well.  I usually drink two or 3 bottles of them over the holidays, and pick up more each season to keep the aging pipeline going.

 

(Puts barleywine on the list...)

If your looking for one that goes from brew to bottle relatively quickly for a barleywine, try the Mr. Beer recipe.  It was my first barleywine and it was really good!  I think it took a total of 4mths before I drank it.  Good stuff!  👍🏽

MrWhy and C-ya like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apologies for resurrecting an older thread, but I think the idea of adding yeast along with some priming sugar is because given the length of time aging and the relatively high ABV of the barleywine it is possible (not very likely but possible) that there are not enough viably active  yeast cells in the beer to carbonate it in the bottle. Adding some more viable yeast will ensure carbonation BUT... simply adding any yeast to a high ABV solution may in fact hobble this yeast which is why the suggestion is that priming can take many months. I have never made a barleywine but I wonder whether adding a champagne yeast (they are cultivated to prime champagne in the bottle and that wine might be 12-14% ABVand aged for years before being bottled) and are considered to be "killer" strains (that is, they do not play nicely with other strains of yeast) will ensure carbonation.... ? 

AnthonyC and MrWhy like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Brewer said:

Apologies for resurrecting an older thread, but I think the idea of adding yeast along with some priming sugar is because given the length of time aging and the relatively high ABV of the barleywine it is possible (not very likely but possible) that there are not enough viably active  yeast cells in the beer to carbonate it in the bottle. Adding some more viable yeast will ensure carbonation BUT... simply adding any yeast to a high ABV solution may in fact hobble this yeast which is why the suggestion is that priming can take many months. I have never made a barleywine but I wonder whether adding a champagne yeast (they are cultivated to prime champagne in the bottle and that wine might be 12-14% ABVand aged for years before being bottled) and are considered to be "killer" strains (that is, they do not play nicely with other strains of yeast) will ensure carbonation.... ? 

No need to apologize.  I actually like when old posts get resurrected, although I wouldn't consider this one very old.  😉  I haven't bottled this yet and may, in fact, made the bottling date sound much closer than it really is.  Bottling date: October 22, 2017 --  I certainly do appreciate the input.  😀👍🏽

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to brew bigger beers, and when I do I almost always add some yeast into the bottle.

 

I either use the champagne yeast, or since I have them, the Mr. Beer yeast.

 

I don't rehydrate or anything fancy. I just cut open the pack and sprinkle some into the bottle. Drop my carb drops in. Then I fill and cap.

 

I am going to try something new with my Otra Noche (a big belgian I brewed)......about 5 days before bottling I am going to drop a pack of Mr. Beer yeast in and let it do it's magic. Then when I bottle, I won't add any extra yeast.

 

No reason other than just to see what might happen.

 

I am not anticipating any noticeable difference.

 

(If I had a pack o T-58, I would use that. But I don't.)

kedogn and AnthonyC like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, MrWhy said:

I tend to brew bigger beers, and when I do I almost always add some yeast into the bottle.

 

I either use the champagne yeast, or since I have them, the Mr. Beer yeast.

 

I don't rehydrate or anything fancy. I just cut open the pack and sprinkle some into the bottle. Drop my carb drops in. Then I fill and cap.

 

I am going to try something new with my Otra Noche (a big belgian I brewed)......about 5 days before bottling I am going to drop a pack of Mr. Beer yeast in and let it do it's magic. Then when I bottle, I won't add any extra yeast.

 

No reason other than just to see what might happen.

 

I am not anticipating any noticeable difference.

 

(If I had a pack o T-58, I would use that. But I don't.)

Thanks, Mr. Why!  Definitely good to know!!!   👍🏽👍🏽👍🏽

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now