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KaijuBrew

Recovering from a brewing mistake - forgot to add water to LBK to line 2

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9 hours ago, AnthonyC said:

Kaiju, what I used to do when I 1st started brewing was make a checklist of everything that I needed to do.  When the step was completed it go a check and then onto the next step.  This may help you out as well.  Good luck!  

 

I always have the printed recipe in front of me but from now on, I am going to check off the steps as I complete them.

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15 hours ago, kedogn said:

Do you have a link to share for documentation on that? A quick search showed up nothing to support it is why I ask.  I see stuff about a lawsuit that was eventually dropped, about them watering down beers to save money.  But that's all. Thanks.

I have heard the same thing.  They brew the beer to be stronger than what is bottled and then use water to make it the correct alcohol.  They also blend beers from different fermenters to get the taste correct.  That is why no matter where in the US you get a Bud Light the taste is identical.

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2 hours ago, BDawg62 said:

I have heard the same thing.  They brew the beer to be stronger than what is bottled and then use water to make it the correct alcohol.  They also blend beers from different fermenters to get the taste correct.  That is why no matter where in the US you get a Bud Light the taste is identical.

Right.  That lawsuit was thrown out because it stated that they actually lowered the ABV below the label amount and when products from various locations were tested, it proved it didn't. 

Brewing a little strong and "watering down" to get to the marked ABV only makes sense, really. According to the feds, the TTB, you can only be off +/- 0.3% of the ABV on your TTB approved label.  That's not much wiggle room.  I can promise you this, you can brew the same beer multiple times, hitting all the exact marks... and your ABV will be different. Why?  The yeast!  You can know how much you have, you can know how viable they are, you can control your fermentation temps perfectly... but those little bastards have a mind of their own!  Hopefully tonight, before the All-Star Home Run Derby (Go Stanton!), I will be dropping the yeast and checking the gravity on 2 'identical' batches of an IPA we brewed. I bet you anything, even though all # were identical, the gravities are different. :)

Btw, adding water to a slighter stronger products to get to the label ABV is nothing knew as distilleries have been doing it for years...

Back to the OP, it was stated that Bud Light is just Bud watered down... I'd like to read more about that.

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Haven't a specific source.  Taking classes.  Learned about a style of brewing where the wort is intentionally made strong, then water is added at bottling, allowing smaller brewing equipment to brew larger batches.  Learned that many of the major breweries in the world employ this technique for some beers.  Example given was Bud Light.

 

Of course, some styles of beers, i.e. some Belgians, are in fact blends of several beers, but that is different than adding water.

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9 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Haven't a specific source.

Ok, thanks for the reply. 

Thinking about it, brewing a stronger beer than needed and adding water at the end makes a lot of sense.   You are basically brewing a concentrate and adding water to "stretch it".  As I sit here, I've been thinking about it, but I don't see any of my recipes this would be helpful with, but in the future if there is, I wouldn't be against doing this, especially since I have a smaller system.

Interesting stuff...

 

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1 minute ago, RickBeer said:

People also brew a high gravity beer, then a small gravity beer with the runnings, getting two beers out of one wort.  

Been there... done that :)  Not too hard to get a good session IPA after brewing a Triple IPA :)

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@MRB Josh R I'd be curious to hear any thoughts on how I can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear on my mistake here?

 

Or did I luck into a new recipe - as some are calling it here - the Calavara *Imperial* chile stout!?

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13 hours ago, HoppySmile! said:

at this point I would Immediatedly drop about a pound and a half of finely chopped halbenero's into the LBK

 

That would truly be out of the frying pan and into the fire!

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7 hours ago, RickBeer said:

People also brew a high gravity beer, then a small gravity beer with the runnings, getting two beers out of one wort.  

 

How does this work? Meaning, what are "the runnings?"

 

Do they re-mash the grain?

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3 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

@MRB Josh R I'd be curious to hear any thoughts on how I can make a silk purse out of a sow's ear on my mistake here?

 

Or did I luck into a new recipe - as some are calling it here - the Calavara *Imperial* chile stout!?

 

Hats off to @Shrike for the Calavara Imperial Stout label!

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On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2017 at 6:54 AM, kedogn said:

I will be dropping the yeast and checking the gravity on 2 'identical' batches of an IPA we brewed. I bet you anything, even though all # were identical, the gravities are different

Well, I couldn't have been more right... just not in a good way though.   Last night I checked the gravity readings on the 3 beers I currently have going.  The standard IPA hit right where it should have.  The other 2, which were the same recipe and hit identical numbers.  However, on 1 of them I pitched with a large starter of Wyeast 1056.  The other a large starter of WLP-001.   The 1056 batch came in 1pt under where it should have, no big deal.  The 001 batch instead of hitting its # came in almost 30 points shy!  If you are unfamiliar with that, I was looking for 1.009 and it came in at 1.038!  Even though all signs of fermentation were over, the main one being that the temp of the beer which had dropped from the 70/72* range, back to 64* (It was 68* when I pitched the yeast, rose to as high as 72* and dropped back to 64* at the end of the week). So, it's an easy enough fix honestly.  Tonight I will boil my O2 wand, put it in sanitizer and then hit the beer with a few blasts of pure oxygen and pitch some more yeast. Why this happened, well, there could be a few possibilities. 1 reason could be that when we were chilling this batch, we had to have it running slowly through the plate chiller, its been HOT out here and the ground water was much warmer than usual, that it didn't have but a trickle going into the conical so it didn't pick up the O2 that it normally would by splashing around and thus we should have added a few shots of oxygen just before pitching the yeast.  Another could be that since this batch still wasn't at the temp after the slow chill, we put it in the fermentation room and the next morning it was at temp, so I pitched the yeast... again, lack of initial oxygen for the yeasties to really go crazy, do their thing and multiply faster than rabbits and weeds!  This is also only the 2nd time I have ever used WLP-001 and it makes me wonder about it.  I'm really thinking it was the lack of initial O2, especially since as per typical, my starters are done a few days in advance, so o2 is very important.   However, I can't say 100% for sure if that was the only thing or possibly I just wont be a fan of WLP-001, I dunno.

If anything, this should show y'all just how important aeration is. :) 

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On 7/9/2017 at 8:24 AM, Bonsai & Brew said:

I vote for the high ABV option -- let it ride!

 

I don't mind higher ABV - just hope the taste is okay!

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And tomorrow - bottling my American Ale experiment #2 and then brewing something new!  Either a partial Mash Porter or IPA!

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41 minutes ago, KaijuBrew said:

And tomorrow - bottling my American Ale experiment #2 and then brewing something new!  Either a partial Mash Porter or IPA!

 

Partial mash IPA is the way to go.

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The day of reckoning has come for the Calavera Imperial Chile Stout!  AKA bottling day.

 

Those who predicted that it would be *robust* were understating it.  The flavors are very strong, but still tasty.   I ended up with 8 bottles worth instead of eleven due to forgetting to add all the water.  Live and learn.

 

I cleaned and sanitized the LBK and proceeding to make a Golden Empire IPA.

 

PS - next time, I will try the prune juice addition!  LOL.

IMG_3998.jpg

IMG_3995.jpg

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3 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

The day of reckoning has come for the Calavera Imperial Chile Stout!  AKA bottling day.

 

Those who predicted that it would be *robust* were understating it.  The flavors are very strong, but still tasty.   I ended up with 8 bottles worth instead of eleven due to forgetting to add all the water.  Live and learn.

 

I cleaned and sanitized the LBK and proceeding to make a Golden Empire IPA.

 

PS - next time, I will try the prune juice addition!  LOL.

IMG_3998.jpg

IMG_3995.jpg

 

They look great!

 

One thing you could have done, now that I think about it, you could have left 6 as the imperial stout and watered two of them down at bottling to make 4.....so 6 strong 4 table.

 

Really, you can still do that if you wanted, by opening them now and doing it (I'm not sure if you would have to re-prime all four or just the two new ones). You could also do it at the pour if you want. (Water it down by putting some water in the glass and then pouring the beer into the glass.

 

And those flavors are absolutely going to mellow out. I based my Belgian-Mexican brew, La Noche Fuerte, on this beer. At sampling I thought I had brewed an Imperial Cinnamon Strong Ale. As the weeks went on the cinnamon mellowed out nicely.

 

You are going to love this beer.

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21 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

They look great!

 

One thing you could have done, now that I think about it, you could have left 6 as the imperial stout and watered two of them down at bottling to make 4.....so 6 strong 4 table.

 

Really, you can still do that if you wanted, by opening them now and doing it (I'm not sure if you would have to re-prime all four or just the two new ones). You could also do it at the pour if you want. (Water it down by putting some water in the glass and then pouring the beer into the glass.

 

And those flavors are absolutely going to mellow out. I based my Belgian-Mexican brew, La Noche Fuerte, on this beer. At sampling I thought I had brewed an Imperial Cinnamon Strong Ale. As the weeks went on the cinnamon mellowed out nicely.

 

You are going to love this beer.

 

Thank you for the encouragement @MrWhy - I was a little down on myself for botching what looks like a good recipe.  The taste is intriguing, almost like a roasted flavor with a bitter edge.  At bottling time, the vanilla extract made it smell like a liquor to my wife.

 

I like your idea of maybe adding a little water at the pour to cut the flavors a bit.

 

How long should I let this condition?

 

And If I am 2 liters down on water, what did this do to my ABV?

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8 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

 

Thank you for the encouragement @MrWhy - I was a little down on myself for botching what looks like a good recipe.  The taste is intriguing, almost like a roasted flavor with a bitter edge.  At bottling time, the vanilla extract made it smell like a liquor to my wife.

 

Extract at bottling will absolutely not smell like it is going to taste later. 

 

8 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

How long should I let this condition?

 

Let's assume the ABV is up, the flavors are more concentrated, etc......also, you bottle 6 of the 750 right? So you've got 6 bottles..........I am going to say do not even crack one open for 16 weeks. 

 

That is a long time, but you've only got six to work with. So wait at the bare minimum 16 weeks (4 months) to let the flavors mellow and blend. Personally, I'd rather see you re-order the recipe, brew it again, and leave this imperial batch for 6 months. 

 

My thing is, I generally get 10 bottles (I add a lot of hops and stuff, lowering the amount of wort/water in the LBK). With 10 bottles, I give myself 3 to "sample" and get it right. That leaves me 6 to 7 "good" bottles.......I want you to give this one plenty of time so the first one you open you are happy with.

 

This is a beer that you will not hurt by aging it out.

 

8 hours ago, KaijuBrew said:

And If I am 2 liters down on water, what did this do to my ABV?

 

Only good things my friend! Only good things.....

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17 hours ago, MrWhy said:

 

Extract at bottling will absolutely not smell like it is going to taste later. 

 

 

Let's assume the ABV is up, the flavors are more concentrated, etc......also, you bottle 6 of the 750 right? So you've got 6 bottles..........I am going to say do not even crack one open for 16 weeks. 

 

That is a long time, but you've only got six to work with. So wait at the bare minimum 16 weeks (4 months) to let the flavors mellow and blend. Personally, I'd rather see you re-order the recipe, brew it again, and leave this imperial batch for 6 months. 

 

My thing is, I generally get 10 bottles (I add a lot of hops and stuff, lowering the amount of wort/water in the LBK). With 10 bottles, I give myself 3 to "sample" and get it right. That leaves me 6 to 7 "good" bottles.......I want you to give this one plenty of time so the first one you open you are happy with.

 

This is a beer that you will not hurt by aging it out.

 

 

Only good things my friend! Only good things.....

 

Thanks @MrWhy!  My pipeline is deep so there is plenty to drink before this one is ready.

 

Now my problem is my beer fridge is full of LBKs brewing and not filled with chilled product!

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On 7/9/2017 at 11:17 AM, kedogn said:

Best lesson learned?  Don't drink while brewing :)  I learned it the hard way and now I don't have a beer until the wort is flowing through the chiller into the fermenter.  :) 

I dont think I've ever brewed without drinking. But, Ive made mistakes too though, haha.

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1 hour ago, epete28 said:

I dont think I've ever brewed without drinking. But, Ive made mistakes too though, haha.

It's really only a "mistake" if you're trying to be exact. If you're just having fun, it's not a mistake, it's your next great beer. :) 

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