76shovel

how to handle a true lager?

48 posts in this topic

for me, after my Diacetyl rest, I carb'ed the bottles at regular carb temp for two weeks, then came the fun.

 

Put them in a fridge at almost close to room temp, then lower the temp every day by about two degrees.  The fridge's temp was controlled by this

 

https://www.mrbeer.com/digital-temperature-controller-outlet-thermostat

 

Remember that Lager in German basically somewhat means "storage".  But, lager yeast love cold temps.  The best thing you can do is to put the bottles in a fridge at the carb temp, then drop the fridge's temp by 2 degrees every day, until you hit around 35.  My 80 bottles of four different recipes of helles have been lagering in the fridge for just short of a month now.  Missed Oktoberfest, but I will keep them there now at 35 degrees until I feel like I'd like a good lager.

 

Or Thanksgiving, which ever comes first.

76shovel likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, now learning that some of the bigger beers will take 3 to 6 months or more from start to finish so I need to start thinking at least a season ahead. This Helles I have perking is a spring version but it will be interesting to see if I can wait that long.

 

Would you carbonate for 2 or for 3 weeks? 

 

I have the Inkbird controller running the little fridge the Helles is fermenting in at 55F. After the room temp carbonation those bottles will go into that fridge for the slow dial down. I know I can hit 40F not sure about 35 but I doubt my unsophisticated taste buds will know the difference. Being downstairs to lower the temp every day is no big deal, my wife says I check on my brews like Ebenezer counting his coin.

 

I just tell her I'm getting my steps in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So this Helles got 3 weeks fermenting at 55F,2 day rest at 70. Bottled in the 740 ml bottles with 4 sugar cubes in each bottle and since then has been in 72 degree temps for 3 days, Bottles are still dead soft.  Waiting, waiting......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 weeks of carbonation at 70-75 and over week back in the fridge slowly dialing temps down using my inkbird. These bottles have gained some pressure but certainly not as firm as the Ales I am used to.

hotrod3539 likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking back at this Helles my initial bottling was 10/01, I know it's way early but I couldn't stand it and opened a bottle tonight, 10/27. I have no frame of reference for this type of beer but even now I know I like it.  At this point I can set this one back and wait while I enjoy other fruits of my labor.

 

 

hotrod3539, MiniYoda and Shrike like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lager 

 

So, in German, "Lager" means storeroom or warehouse.  To make a *true* lager, takes time. A few months of storage.  Best you can do is make a batch, put it away....COOL, and a few months later, it will be great.  Hard to reist, but in time comes good things.  It is hard to make a true lager, but I will get there myself....someday

 

Oh.....want a challenge?  Brew a true Marzen.  The German word Marzen means..........?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Märzen

 

adoYiniM

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, MiniYoda said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lager 

 

So, in German, "Lager" means storeroom or warehouse.  To make a *true* lager, takes time. A few months of storage.  Best you can do is make a batch, put it away....COOL, and a few months later, it will be great.  Hard to reist, but in time comes good things.  It is hard to make a true lager, but I will get there myself....someday

 

Oh.....want a challenge?  Brew a true Marzen.  The German word Marzen means..........?

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Märzen

 

adoYiniM

 

 

Quote

 

Is 40-45F too cool for the lagering?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bumping this one, because I just ordered two Lager kits, and am getting ready to use the lager fridge.

 

Have a question, and this is coming from an old geezer who is only half drunk (I'm working on it).  Correct me if I wrong, but basically the difference between logering and conditioning is the temp.  You "lager" beers with lager yeast at or around 40 degrees, and you "condition" beers with ale yeast at room temperature.  Correct?  If this is correct, then basically any lager based beer could be a good for Oktoberfest if made in March, stored in a fridge, and enjoyed in September.  Yes, there is a true Marzen/Oktoberfest style, but if I were to take any Mr. Beer recipe, such as Austin Pils or Mad Ludwig's Marzen, or Munich Malt Monster, and "lager" them for 6 months at 40 degrees or so, they should come out better than if they were stored at room temp for 6 months.

 

Just wondering, because I'd like to make some lager beers in March, and enjoy them in September, and am willing to sacrifice space in a fridge to "lager" them at a cold temp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

bumping this one, because I just ordered two Lager kits, and am getting ready to use the lager fridge.

 

Have a question, and this is coming from an old geezer who is only half drunk (I'm working on it).  Correct me if I wrong, but basically the difference between logering and conditioning is the temp.  You "lager" beers with lager yeast at or around 40 degrees, and you "condition" beers with ale yeast at room temperature.  Correct?  If this is correct, then basically any lager based beer could be a good for Oktoberfest if made in March, stored in a fridge, and enjoyed in September.  Yes, there is a true Marzen/Oktoberfest style, but if I were to take any Mr. Beer recipe, such as Austin Pils or Mad Ludwig's Marzen, or Munich Malt Monster, and "lager" them for 6 months at 40 degrees or so, they should come out better than if they were stored at room temp for 6 months.

 

Just wondering, because I'd like to make some lager beers in March, and enjoy them in September, and am willing to sacrifice space in a fridge to "lager" them at a cold temp.

I “lager” my beers before theyre bottled. For example:

 

1-brew

2-secondary(optional) and DR

3-lager in secondary for a few weeks, depends on your OG

4-bottle

5-condition

6-drink

 

now heres what i have done in the past also. 

1-brew

2-DR

3-keg

4- lager

5- serve

 

Beer is always better conditioned (@ room temp). Even ipas are better conditioned for a few weeks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me speak again. I actully just pulled a lager out of my cold closet just a few hours ago to DR. Ill probably dump the yeast (acting as a secondary), let it sit in the warm side for two days then ill push it back in the cold closet for a day or two and then keg. 

 

You see, ive done fast lagering and ive done slow lagering. Ive lowered the temp by 5 degrees everyday until it hits 35 to not shock the yeast. Ive lagered for weeks. Thats the slow way. Now i always do the fast way cuz theres really no difference to me. I secondary (sometimes ive even skipped that), crash to 35 immediately in secondary or in the keg and i keg when one is available or put the crashed keg in the cold closet until a keezer spot opens up.

 

my point is, dont get so caught up in the process. Id reccomend just leaving in the original LBK and crashing for a week maybe and then bottle and lager the bottles for a few weeks.  The process is a little different with an LBK. Yall dont really secondary in an LBK. I would feel confined not doing so also cuz you have a “burp lid” and dont have to worry about sanitizer suckback. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I refrigerate bottled lagers for keeping following a 3-4 week carbonation period at room temperature.  I will be the first to admit that I have much to learn before brewing the perfect lager, but I do know that trying to carbonate beer in bottles at 40 F does not work very well.

Shrike and MiniYoda like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't use a secondary, basically because it's not something I've learned yet. I know, not hard, but I use the basic LBK to bottle method.  In the past, for me lagering meant fermenting in the 50's, two days at room temp for diastolic rest, then bottle and put back in the fridge to lager, lowering the temp from room to mid 30's two degrees each day.  My primary question is basically, would all Mr. Beer's recipes that have lager yeast benefit from long-term (5-6 months) lagering at 35 degrees

D Kristof likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed, forgot about the carbonation.  make that

 

1 - ferment in the low 50's

2 - two days diastolic rest at room temp

3 - bottle and carbonate at room temp for 2 weeks

4 - put in fridge and lower temp 1-2 degrees every day from room temp until mid 30's

5 - the question.......can I leave lagers in the fridge in the mid 30's for 5-6 months?

 

 

Bonsai & Brew likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, MiniYoda said:

I don't use a secondary, basically because it's not something I've learned yet. I know, not hard, but I use the basic LBK to bottle method.  In the past, for me lagering meant fermenting in the 50's, two days at room temp for diastolic rest, then bottle and put back in the fridge to lager, lowering the temp from room to mid 30's two degrees each day.  My primary question is basically, would all Mr. Beer's recipes that have lager yeast benefit from long-term (5-6 months) lagering at 35 degrees

Once carbonated, I would say yes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew that spelling didn't look right.  FINALLY the beer is kicking in

 

and for those who were wondering what this old fat drunk was TRYING to say, it's Diacetyl rest

Shrike and Bonsai & Brew like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, but the only lager I have in the fridge is Miller Lite.  I'll drink it with you, but give me a few months to have a Mr. Beer lager

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MiniYoda said:

Sure, but the only lager I have in the fridge is Miller Lite.  I'll drink it with you, but give me a few months to have a Mr. Beer lager

 

 

K, I'll have a Munich Dunkel lager and you can have an ale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, MiniYoda said:

Sure, but the only lager I have in the fridge is Miller Lite.  I'll drink it with you, but give me a few months to have a Mr. Beer lager

 

 Bottled my Helles 10/1  I'm gettin ready to get ready.

 

Quote

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now