joshua.j.grissom

Liquid Yeast

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How does everyone feel about using liquid yeast in an Lbk, given that they are small 2 gallon batches? Most liquid yeasts are made for at least 5-10 gallon batches would I need a yeast starter or could I just put the whole thing in the Lbk? I read some pros and cons for using liquid yeast and just wanted some more opinions on the matter. Is this a little mad scientist? 

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liquid yeast... a little costly. if you want to customize ester profiles in your beer it's good to use. if the yeast is relatively fresh I wouldn't even bother with a starter since you are overpitching. imo, a waste of money on the small scale like a lbk.  much of your esters come from the growth cycle. since youre overpitching there wont be much of this.

 

for the lbk I would just use dry yeast and save your money.

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Right, Liquid yeast is designed for 5 gallon batches, with a starter.  For a 2 gallon batch they are expensive.  Many liquid yeasts exist as dry yeasts, but there are quite a few that aren't available in dry form.  Of course an 11 / 11.5g packet of dry yeast is designed for a 5 gallon batch too.

 

I have not used liquid yeast yet.

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I typically brew 2.5 gallon all grain batches, the size just works for me.  I use both dry and liquid yeast depending on the style that I am brewing.  While liquid yeast is more expensive to purchase, I make starters for my batches and save 1/3 of it for future batches that again I will make a starter and save 1/3 of it.  So that initial spend of $8 to $9 for the yeast can in some cases give me 5 batches of beer.  I actually prefer liquid yeast most of the time.  There just aren't enough varieties of dry yeast to match up to the different styles that I brew.

 

Also note that depending on the age of the liquid yeast, you may have to make a starter just to have enough yeast for even a 2 gallon batch.

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I have been a pretty much strict liquid yeast person ever since I jumped from the LBK.  However, a buddy of mine that works at a local 'big boys' brewery showed me that that they use US-05 via the big 500g "bricks".  Rehydrate, pitch and away you go!  I am seriously considering doing this for several of our beers, pretty much anything I would use 1056 in, as the amount of time and stress that it would relieve from me for not having to worry about getting enough yeast via starters would be awesome!   If I am doing my math right, using the Mr. Malty yeast calc, a 500g brick would be good for basically 7-7.5 batches of an OG at 1.056 and 30 gals as it states 65g is needed for that.  500g / 65g = 7.69 batches.  $70 for the brick is roughly $10 for full batch.  As it is since we don't save yeast right now, and honestly with the hassle, I dunno if I will, I am paying $7/each smack pack, plus who knows what in DME to do the starters (so with the dry, its already saving $4/batch, and lets not forget the price of gas to go get yeast at least 1x a week).  I know for using liquid and being able grow my own yeast, its not bad... it just takes a long time, even when I was getting help from my wife on making them (I moved everything out to the brewery from the house, so I don't ask her to do that any more, as she is freaked out a little by using the propane and I understand) :) 

 

Yup, after putting that in writing... back to dried yeast for me after I use up what I already have :)

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3 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Right, Liquid yeast is designed for 5 gallon batches, with a starter.  For a 2 gallon batch they are expensive.  Many liquid yeasts exist as dry yeasts, but there are quite a few that aren't available in dry form.  Of course an 11 / 11.5g packet of dry yeast is designed for a 5 gallon batch too.

 

I have not used liquid yeast yet.

So it could be safe to use a whole "vial" of liquid yeast without a starter if you were feeling froggy considering that the dry yeast packs are also made for 5 gallon batches? 

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28 minutes ago, joshua.j.grissom said:

So it could be safe to use a whole "vial" of liquid yeast without a starter if you were feeling froggy considering that the dry yeast packs are also made for 5 gallon batches? 

Better to over pitch (to a point) than to under pitch any day.

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51 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Yes, with the "to a point" remark.  Significantly overpitching can result in many issues, which is why "to a point" is there.  ;)

Actually, *you* are the reason the "to a point" is there.  To me, it would be obvious now, but I also understand to new people it wouldn't be and I knew you would have corrected it :) 

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Just now, RickBeer said:

Yes, have to write answers to the lowest common denominator.  

I, honestly, have a problem doing that at times.  When someone is learning to brew with me, I know that they don't know anything about it, so I am free to speak in such ways.  When talking brewing with people who brew, I assume (you know what they say about that) that people know the basics at least and amounts of yeast, to me, is a "basic" :)

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I mostly use dry yeast. I used a smackpack (Wyeast 3711) for a saison recently. It was good but I did not get as much yeast taste as I had hoped.

Will open another bottle tonight & see if better (bottled 5/28).

 

Next time I will use half of it and save the rest in the fridge or use half a pack of dry yeast, but the available strains are not the same..

 

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13 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

I mostly use dry yeast. I used a smackpack (Wyeast 3711) for a saison recently. It was good but I did not get as much yeast taste as I had hoped.

Will open another bottle tonight & see if better (bottled 5/28).

 

Next time I will use half of it and save the rest in the fridge or use half a pack of dry yeast, but the available strains are not the same..

 

 

3711 is a French saison yeast, which is more neutral in flavor than a Belgian saison yeast (Wyeast 3274). To get more "yeast flavor" (esters), either underpitch, ferment warm (70+), or both.

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re underpitching... sometimes this is actually desirable.  when you want to stress the yeast early on and have a prolonged growth cycle to make lots of esters...

 

if I am doing a hefeweizen with liquid yeast, I will skip the starter, under pitch... and let the temps go up a bit more than usual.  this way I can get lots of banana esters while the yeast make up their cell count numbers.   when doing a Trappist ale I also underpitch a little and let the temps ramp up wherever they want. 

 

if you don't want ester development you pitch enough yeast and keep the temps in optimal range... but where's the sense in spending all that money on liquid yeast for a result you can get with a 3 dollar dry yeast?  

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17 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

3711 is a French saison yeast, which is more neutral in flavor than a Belgian saison yeast (Wyeast 3274). To get more "yeast flavor" (esters), either underpitch, ferment warm (70+), or both.

Yes, I have under pitched and under oxygenated too with wheat beers to get higher esters.

 

In this one I was looking for the  lemony flavor described with the 3711, but did not get not much. I also did not get the temp that high ( I think it only went to high 60s in my basement)

Also not much head on that beer, dissipates very fast. It is an easy drink, refreshing but stronger than it tastes (Calculates to 6%).

Maybe next time add maltodextrin or a bit more grain. This was a conversion of an all grain recipe to Mr B..

Mr B Canadian Blonde 13 IBU, 3.5 ABV, 1.56 lb DME eq.
0.25 lb Pilsner DME
0.5 lb Wheat DME
4 oz Vienna Malt Grain steep.
0.2 lb clear Candi sugar
Hops add 7 IBUs  - 0.5 oz each  Strisselpalt and Saaz mixed. 0.5 oz boil 10 min, 0.5 oz at flameout.
Yeast Wyeast 3711

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8 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

but where's the sense in spending all that money on liquid yeast for a result you can get with a 3 dollar dry yeast?  

Well, honestly, because you can save a lot of $$ on yeast using liquid yeast, if you do it right and if you brew often enough to make it worth the time (this is a big factor) and constantly have fresh yeast.  What I used to do is take 2 smack packs, do a 5L starter, split that into 4 mason jars. I could then take each of those and do the same if I wanted and then take what I had from there and make starters for per batch as needed.  In the end run it saved a lot of cash... but took a lot of time.  Once Manfish really got going, I realized I didn't have the time do be doing it that way any more and I was forced (for lack of a better term) to start going with 2 smack packs per batch and making the yeast I need per batch from it, thus spending more $$.  I am to the point now where I realize that time is the most precious thing I have and if I can be doing something else other than working on starters, I want to do that, so hence my comment above about going back to dry yeast, especially at the pricing you can get if you buy it in the 500g brick vs 11.5g packet.

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you can save money by using dry yeast and washing it / harvesting it when done to use in another batch.  even if you only do about 4 generations on one sachet of yeast, that's still a big savings over liquid yeast.

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