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epete28

Tasted My American Ale!

20 posts in this topic

Well, I had my 1st homebrew in a long time today, American Ale standard refill, on 3.5 weeks conditioning. I can't say anything bad about it really, except 2 tsps of sugar may have been a tad much for 24 oz of beer. It was super fizzy and the head was ridiculous, but the taste was fine. A week or so more of conditioning will probably make this really nice, although I think it's good now. I was a little upset that I only refrigerated 1 of them after it was gone, lol.

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38 minutes ago, 76shovel said:

Ok since I am still in the beginning stages of this hobby, What are effects of too much sugar? Too much head?

A beer thats carbed like a soda. Possible gushers, meaning when you open it, the head starts pouring out if the bottle before you can pour it. Its just a shame really, 

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1 hour ago, 76shovel said:

Ok since I am still in the beginning stages of this hobby, What are effects of too much sugar? Too much head?

In this case, I could barely pour it because of the head. I had to lean my glass almost flat in relation to the bottle. I'm an expert at pouring a beer with no head whatsoever, but even then I had to wait a couple minutes to drink it. Big picture, it's just a minor nuisance, but I can do without it.

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Following advice from more than one person, I cut back 1/4 tsp for each recommendation on the Mr. Beer chart.  I still get good head but not fizzy beer.  As most of my beers are German or Czech style, that is fine by me.

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too much sugar can cause bottle bombs.  sugar + live yeast = co2 = pressure build up in bottle . bottle bombs are not cool.

 

plastic bottle bombs are only messy.  glass bottle bombs can seriously injure you... and are messy.

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1 minute ago, zorak1066 said:

too much sugar can cause bottle bombs.  sugar + live yeast = co2 = pressure build up in bottle . bottle bombs are not cool.

 

plastic bottle bombs are only messy.  glass bottle bombs can seriously injure you... and are messy.

I've had a plastic bottle bomb, on my last batch before my "hiatus". I've talked about this before, I'm 99% sure I had a stalled fermentation because my FG was too high. I unwisely bottled it anyway. Several days into conditioning, the wife and I came home and "Why do I smell beer" was her question. The beers were in a cabinet in our bedroom. I don't think I need to elaborate any further. Lol

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5 hours ago, epete28 said:

I've had a plastic bottle bomb, on my last batch before my "hiatus". I've talked about this before, I'm 99% sure I had a stalled fermentation because my FG was too high. I unwisely bottled it anyway. Several days into conditioning, the wife and I came home and "Why do I smell beer" was her question. The beers were in a cabinet in our bedroom. I don't think I need to elaborate any further. Lol

 

 With our air conditioning working overtime the basement is a few degrees too cool for carbonation/ conditioning, still ok for fermentation. I use the 740 ml plastic bottles and have been keeping 3 or so batches at a time in an upstairs hall closet. I sure don't need those blowing open!

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I carb in my basement in a "carbonation chamber". 

 

Nothing fancy really.  Just a Coleman cooler, a 50 light strand of Xmas lights and a temp controller.  Put your beers to be carbonated in the cooler, spread the Xmas lights around in the cooler and then set your temp controller at 75.  Beers are perfectly carbonated in 2 weeks.  Remove beers from the cooler and store at basement temps of 62 to 68 (depending on season).

 

Alternative to temp controller is a timer set to be on for 10 minutes per hour.  Monitor the temperature and adjust accordingly.  More time on in the winter and less time in the summer.  Just try to keep the beers at a temperature below 80 degrees during this time.

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22 minutes ago, epete28 said:

We don't have basements down here in the south. I wish we did though.

sure wish I did too! i'd just live down there with my beer and never go back up stairs.......

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6 hours ago, epete28 said:

We don't have basements down here in the south. I wish we did though.

If you had a basement it would probably be full of water.

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43 minutes ago, gophers6 said:

If you had a basement it would probably be full of water.

Precisely why we don't have them!?

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1 hour ago, gophers6 said:

If you had a basement it would probably be full of water.

Just like my storm cellar when I lived in Oklahoma... that always made me laugh.  Then again, we lived above a bunch of caves, so go figure.  Good "Picher, Oklahoma" sometime :)

 

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Update on this beer, it's 5 weeks in the bottle now and getting really good. It's retaining a decent amount of head, and even has the audacity to be lacing my glass nicely. Not bad at all for a standard refill in my opinion.

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On 9/29/2017 at 9:33 PM, 76shovel said:

Ordered American Ale today, Not sure it I'll brew it as is or get all -chemistry set- with it.

I've never gone wrong adding a little DME and hops to anything, but it's not bad by itself.

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