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Neub7

Help with cider taste please

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I have 3 batches of Mr. Beer that have been ready to drink so far, and they all have had a cidery taste.  My first was the CAL, my second was the Bavarian Wheat, and my third was the Irish stout.  I am doing the 3/4 method.  3 weeks fermenting, and at least 4 on conditioning.  Some of the CAL has been conditiong for about 8, and some of the Wheat and Stout have been 6 weeks, and still have the cider taste.  The stout isn't quite as noticeable, but it's still there.  I am sanitizing very well, and my Temps for everything are right on par with everyone elses.  I am bottling in both glass and the plastic Mr. Beer bottles, and the plastic bottles seem to have a more noticeable cider taste.  I am using Mr. Beer drops or corn sugar for bottling.  I used no add ins for the CAL, a booster pack for the Wheat, and some LME for the Stout.  Can someone please help me out please.  What am I doing wrong.  

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4 minutes ago, Neub7 said:

I have 3 batches of Mr. Beer that have been ready to drink so far, and they all have had a cidery taste.  My first was the CAL, my second was the Bavarian Wheat, and my third was the Irish stout.  I am doing the 3/4 method.  3 weeks fermenting, and at least 4 on conditioning.  Some of the CAL has been conditiong for about 8, and some of the Wheat and Stout have been 6 weeks, and still have the cider taste.  The stout isn't quite as noticeable, but it's still there.  I am sanitizing very well, and my Temps for everything are right on par with everyone elses.  I am bottling in both glass and the plastic Mr. Beer bottles, and the plastic bottles seem to have a more noticeable cider taste.  I am using Mr. Beer drops or corn sugar for bottling.  I used no add ins for the CAL, a booster pack for the Wheat, and some LME for the Stout.  Can someone please help me out please.  What am I doing wrong.  

I have come to believe that is just a characteristic of MB yeast. I have had it to some degree every time I've used MB yeast. It really doesn't even bother me that bad anymore. But, whenever I've used another yeast, US-05 in particular, I haven't had much of an issue with it.

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I really don't know that much about yeasts.  I live in a very small town, and have 1 store that has a very small homebrew section, and hardly any yeasts.   Is  US-05 a good all around yeast, or do I need different yeasts for different kinds of beers.  I think I'm going to lean my beer making to Stouts, Oktoberfest, Amber and Browns.  What is my best option for those beers?

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@Neub7 I learned of US-05 right here on these forums. These guys on here have such a wealth of knowledge that its crazy! Anyway, yes, 05 is a very forgiving, all around yeast I believe. I love it. It always leaves my beers tasting very "clean".

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Thank you.  I'll see if my store can order that for me.  Much appreciated!

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I see the packs of S-05 are for 5 to 6 gallon batches.  Do you use the whole pack in a 2 gallon batch or are you able use half and save it for the next batch?

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5 minutes ago, Neub7 said:

I see the packs of S-05 are for 5 to 6 gallon batches.  Do you use the whole pack in a 2 gallon batch or are you able use half and save it for the next batch?

Pitch it all, it won't hurt anything. I wouldn't worry with saving it unless you are going to start another batch right away.

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US-05 is a very neutral yeast.  I had the cider taste in all of my batches until I quit using the MR. Beer yeast.  Pitch the entire pack into a 2 gallon batch.  It is near impossible to overpitch on a homebrew scale. 

 

US-05 is the same yeast as Wyeast 1056 and White Labs 001 (both liquid yeast).  It will ferment very clean at lower temperatures. 

 

You say your temps are in line with where we say to be, what are those temps?  Are they wort temps or ambient air temps?  Also, are they measured using a probe that is insulated and taped to the side of your LBK or just what the Mr. Beer stick on thermometer says?

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My ambient air temp is 66-67 constantly for femur and 73 constant for conditioning. Not sure on wort temp. I don't have a probe. 

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Are any of these good in phase of US-04 or US-05?  These are what my small town beer shop had on hand. 20171007_095233.thumb.jpg.d293c0b6d14b3caee81ef7b005609fb4.jpg

20171007_095327.jpg

20171007_095239.jpg

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Have no idea what the second one is.

 

The third was in a LAGER yeast.  Also, note the date on it - 1/7/2015.  Should be thrown away.  

 

Nottingham is NOT something to take the place of S-05.  Both it and S-04 are British Ale yeasts.  

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Ok. Thanks. I'll have to order some US-05 off Amazon.   Thanks. 

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11 hours ago, RickBeer said:

Have no idea what the second one is.

 

The third was in a LAGER yeast.  Also, note the date on it - 1/7/2015.  Should be thrown away.  

 

Nottingham is NOT something to take the place of S-05.  Both it and S-04 are British Ale yeasts.  

You're joking, right? 

 

Or you're confusing Nottingham with Windsor. 

 

Nottingham ferments even more cleanly than US-05 (there is no S-05). And it does well at even lower temperatures. For a west coast style IPA or APA, I'd use Nottingham over US-05 any day (unless temperatures are above 65).

 

The second one is a package of Munton's yeast. It's a general purpose yeast, like S-33 or Cooper's.

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From Lallemand's site:  Nottingham is an English style ale yeast selected for its high performance ability and versatility. Traditional styles brewed with this yeast include but are not limited to Pale Ales, Ambers, Porters, Stouts and Barleywines. Furthermore, this highly versatile yeast strain allows for tremendous creativity when brewing beers out of the regular spectrum: in addition to these traditional styles, Nottingham gives the possibility of creating styles such as Golden Ale, Kölsch, Lager-style beers, IPA, and Imperial Stout, among many others.  Windsor ale yeast is a true English strain that produces a beer which is estery to both palate and nose with a slight fresh yeasty flavor.  Beers created with Windsor are usually described as full-bodied, fruity English ales. Brewers choose Windsor to produce beers that range from pale ale to porter with moderate alcohol levels and the flavor and aroma characteristics of the best traditional ales. Traditional styles brewed with this yeast include but are not limitedto Milds, Bitters, Irish Reds, English Brown ales, porters and Sweet Stouts.

 

From the Fermentis site: S-05 is an American ale yeast producing well balanced beers with low diacetyl and a very clean, crisp end palate. Forms a firm foam head and presents a very good ability to stay in suspension during fermentation

 

I use Notty for Porters, and it almost always overflows.    I use S-05 for Reds, Fruit Wheat (clean to get fruit flavor vs. using a yeast that provides fruit flavor), and a Brown.  Notty is not going to be as clean as US-05, but it won't be objectionable (slight esters), where US-05 has none.  Notty will also end up drier, since it attenuates more fully than US-05.

 

 

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8 hours ago, bpgreen said:

Nottingham ferments even more cleanly than US-05 (there is no S-05). And it does well at even lower temperatures. For a west coast style IPA or APA, I'd use Nottingham over US-05 any day (unless temperatures are above 65).

I dunno if I would use it "over" US-05, but back in the day I went through A LOT of Notty.    I think I used it back then, mainly, because it was cheaper than US-05.  A very good yeast I used in darn near everything I brewed back then... which was 95% Pales, Reds and IPAs.

Now that I am back to using dried yeast, I will be using US-05 though.  I haven't used dried yeast in so long, I am interested in seeing how it goes and how long it takes to really get going.  I will be using it on Thursday when I brew up a 30 gal batch of Chaos Ensues, a 6.9% IRA.

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