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Bassman

Before I Dump

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I mean, before I dump the beer. I recently brewed up 2 old MB seasonals, an ESB and a Saison. The yeast and malt were old. Also, when I brewed the ESB I pitched way too high. I did get a kreusen, but not much. Last week I checked the gravity of the ESB and it was 1.025 with temperature correction. It also tasted sweet in a bad way, almost cloying. I thought of bottling it, but was concerned about bottle bombs. Luckily I was busy this week so I had a chance to let it sit on the back burner of my mind. I called a couple of LHBS and the advice I got was that I got a stuck fermentation because I stressed the yeast, so I should pitch fresh yeast and not give up yet. I will be doing that tomorrow. I even "admitted" to one store that it was a Mr Beer kit and he was supportive, even told me to look for sales after the holidays at Best Buy. I liked that he was not a jerk about it or judgmental! By the way, I checked the gravity of the Saison and it is at 1.016, which is close to what it should be. It also tasted good, and I like Saisons. So tomorrow I will bottle that and brew the Santa Rita Pale Ale kit that I bought.

 

So the ESB may not be dead after all. I have some fresh MB yeast that I got with the Santa Rita kit. I also got the MB Churchill yeast with the can of Churchill Nut Brown Ale that I bought. Two questions. Does it make a difference which MB yeast I use to restart a fermentation? Should I rehydrate the yeast? I know the MB instructions have you sprinkle the yeast, but I'm in triage mode.

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I'll leave the advice to someone like rickbeer, but I did feel the need to point out

 

Dumping beer is never ever ever ever allowed.  Stay where you are, the beer police are on the way as they have joined forces with pre-crime and already knew your insidious plans.

 

But, what do I know, I'm new and a bit crazy

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1 hour ago, Bassman said:

I mean, before I dump the beer. I recently brewed up 2 old MB seasonals, an ESB and a Saison. The yeast and malt were old. Also, when I brewed the ESB I pitched way too high. I did get a kreusen, but not much. Last week I checked the gravity of the ESB and it was 1.025 with temperature correction. It also tasted sweet in a bad way, almost cloying. I thought of bottling it, but was concerned about bottle bombs. Luckily I was busy this week so I had a chance to let it sit on the back burner of my mind. I called a couple of LHBS and the advice I got was that I got a stuck fermentation because I stressed the yeast, so I should pitch fresh yeast and not give up yet. I will be doing that tomorrow. I even "admitted" to one store that it was a Mr Beer kit and he was supportive, even told me to look for sales after the holidays at Best Buy. I liked that he was not a jerk about it or judgmental! By the way, I checked the gravity of the Saison and it is at 1.016, which is close to what it should be. It also tasted good, and I like Saisons. So tomorrow I will bottle that and brew the Santa Rita Pale Ale kit that I bought.

 

So the ESB may not be dead after all. I have some fresh MB yeast that I got with the Santa Rita kit. I also got the MB Churchill yeast with the can of Churchill Nut Brown Ale that I bought. Two questions. Does it make a difference which MB yeast I use to restart a fermentation? Should I rehydrate the yeast? I know the MB instructions have you sprinkle the yeast, but I'm in triage mode.

How long ago did you pitch? If its been a few days then go ahead and re-pitch. If its been two or three weeks, dump it. Sorry. The longer it goes the greater risk for infection. 

 

Im not an expert on what yeast comes with each extract, sorry. But id use whatever i can in an emergency. 

 

Rehydrating the yeast makes for a shorter lag time. In this case id rehydrate. 

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14 hours ago, Creeps McLane said:

How long ago did you pitch? If its been a few days then go ahead and re-pitch. If its been two or three weeks, dump it. Sorry. The longer it goes the greater risk for infection. 

 

Im not an expert on what yeast comes with each extract, sorry. But id use whatever i can in an emergency. 

 

Rehydrating the yeast makes for a shorter lag time. In this case id rehydrate. 

I pitched a month ago. When I did the gravity test a week ago it tasted sweet but not sour.

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1 minute ago, Bassman said:

I pitched a month ago. When I did the gravity test a week ago it tasted sweet but not sour.

Well I guess it did ferment just not as far as you’re expecting. Do you have an extra LBK? Maybe you should transfer it to get it off all that dead yeast. Then re pitch.

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51 minutes ago, Creeps McLane said:

Well I guess it did ferment just not as far as you’re expecting. Do you have an extra LBK? Maybe you should transfer it to get it off all that dead yeast. Then re pitch.

Yes, I can transfer t my other LBK after I bottle and clean it today. Thanks!

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Thanks for your insight Rick. I definitely don't want to end up with a bunch of bottles of beer that I hate and have to clean out for no good reason. At least the Saison should turn out good based on the gravity reading I got and the little taste I took.

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5 hours ago, Bassman said:

Thanks for your insight Rick. I definitely don't want to end up with a bunch of bottles of beer that I hate and have to clean out for no good reason. At least the Saison should turn out good based on the gravity reading I got and the little taste I took.

That seasonal Saison was one of their best IMHO.

 

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8 hours ago, Bassman said:

I pitched a month ago. When I did the gravity test a week ago it tasted sweet but not sour.

In case you used a refractometer, check the calibration. I had one that read too high on FG. I did repitch too but it hardly moved it. Then when I checked calibration,  it was off and when I corrected it was fine when calculated out. Since then bottled it and it is OK.

 

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20 minutes ago, Nickfixit said:

In case you used a refractometer, check the calibration. I had one that read too high on FG. I did repitch too but it hardly moved it. Then when I checked calibration,  it was off and when I corrected it was fine when calculated out. Since then bottled it and it is OK.

 

I used a hydrometer. 

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Which yeast did you use with the Saison.  If you used a Saison yeast and it finished at 1.016 then it is no where near done. If you bottled, keep them cool after conditioning to prevent bottle bombs.  I have never had a Saison finish higher than 1.005, those yeast are beast and they can take their good old time to finish if everything is not perfect.

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24 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

Which yeast did you use with the Saison.  If you used a Saison yeast and it finished at 1.016 then it is no where near done. If you bottled, keep them cool after conditioning to prevent bottle bombs.  I have never had a Saison finish higher than 1.005, those yeast are beast and they can take their good old time to finish if everything is not perfect.

I used Belle Saison, it was 4 weeks in the fermenter. I bottled it last night and put the bottles in a covered plastic bin in the kitchen. This way, if there's a bottle bomb the mess will be limited. 

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bella saison ferments best WARM.  I let my temps climb as high as they want.  advice received on another forum by mashani I believe was on the last few days before you think it is done, jack up the heat on the wort.  I have yet to have a saison not finish below 1.01.  this yeast will daintily chew through everything you can throw at it. it is a dainty eater unlike uso4 which is a monster. it takes its time but cleans its plate.  the warmer bella is the more it will eat in my experience.

 

bella saison yeast also imparts flavors to the beer you may not be used to. mine have been coming out a complex mishmash of :  fruity, peppery, herbal, floral and a slight backnote of yeast funkiness.  

 

I would never dump a beer. if I was worried about bottle bombs I would just undercarb it (use less sugar) and maybe keep the screw caps a little lose.. checking them frequently for the need to bleed off pressure.  or just drink it flat.

 

check bottle firmness (assuming plastic bottles) every other day or so.  if they are getting too firm, gently open the cap a turn or too to bleed off gas.. . if you are  really concerned.

 

this brings up a good point for new brewers:  know your yeast. what temps it likes. what flavors it produces. how they behave. 

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